Harney Slammed in Hospital Beds Row

The number of sick people waiting on trolleys and chairs for a hospital bed fell below 500 today.A survey of A&E crisis overcrowding found 492 patients unable to get a space on a ward, down 78 from yesterday's headcount.The Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation (Inmo) said Cork University Hospital, the Mid-West in Limerick and Beaumont and Tallaght in Dublin were facing the worst conditions with more than 33 people waiting for a bed in each emergency room.Jan O'Sullivan, Labour's health spokeswoman, accused Health Minister Mary Harney of failing to respond."The very least that people should expect when there is a mess like this, is for some kind of reaction from the person who is supposed to be in charge. Instead we get a deafening silence," she said."Just where is Mary Harney, and why at a time when people expect some leadership and some action, has she gone to ground"Crisis in A&E waiting time was declared a national emergency in 2006 when 495 patients were recorded on trolleys in one day.Ms O'Sullivan added: "It is simply not acceptable that people are forced to endure these appalling conditions, and yet the minister does not seem to give a hoot."Other hospitals badly hit by overcrowding were the Midland Regional in Mullingar with 29; Cavan General with 27; Our Lady of Lourdes Drogheda with 24 and in Dublin, The Mater with 29; St Vincent's with 25; and Connolly Hospital, Blanchardstown with 24.PA Media

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Psychological Burden on Caring for Dementia at Home Can Be Huge
By all accounts, Dorothy Housden has an ideal situation for someone living with dementia.She's in a bright and spacious ground floor suite in a house with her son Bill and his wife Mila Coutinho living above. Dorothy's bedroom has a high enough ceiling to hold a sleek lift above her hospital bed, which is covered with one of her gorgeous black and patterned hand made quilts.Although the doorways are a tight squeeze, Bill or Mila can push Dorothy's wheelchair out to the ground-floor deck in the backyard. If it's sunny and warm, Dorothy, 86, can sit beneath the grape vines watching for chickadees.Dorothy's new digs are a recent change. She used to be upstairs but when her ability to walk deteriorated, the stairs became a barrier."I almost went over backwards twice with her, taking her up and down the stairs," Bill said. "It was obviously too dangerous." Bill figured that as Dorothy's dementia progressed and her mental capacities declined, learning how to operate a stairlift would be too difficult for her. Once a champion quilt maker, Dorothy can still knit, but stopped making her colourful quilts about 18 months ago.Making the suite comfortable for Dorothy wasn't cheap. Altogether, it cost about $35,000 to buy the lift, hospital bed and wheelchair and make other changes.Bill considers it money well spent."I always promised Mom that she could die at home in her own bed," he said. "I'd do anything for my mom. There's nothing I won't do for her. She's the only mom I've got." As for Dorothy, she loves where she lives."I love being with my family more than anything," she said.Bill and Mila are part of a huge but relatively unacknowledged part of the health care system in B.C. They're two of an estimated one million people who for family, friends and neighbours living with dementia and other diseases. In B.C. alone, it is estimated that replacing what they do with paid caregivers would cost up to $3.5 billion a year.Not all the home caregiving is as extensive as what Bill and Mila provide. Home care can range from relatively simple tasks such as buying groceries for a friend or driving Mom or Dad to a doctor's appointment to much more time-consuming and intimate help such as bathing or full-time, live-in care.But while volunteer home care saves the public dollars and cents and keeps people at home and out of the province's 293 residential care facilities, there's still a cost to home caregiving, said Isobel Mackenzie, B.C.'s seniors advocate.The psychological burden of caring for someone with dementia at home can be immense, she said.by the showed that the number of caregivers experiencing stress has grown in the past few years by two percentage points to 31 per cent.Caring for a loved one with dementia increases the risk of caregiver distress by 25 per cent. If you add behaviour problems and psychological challenges to the dementia mix, the risk of caregiver distress rises to 75 per cent, according to the "We don't like to talk about it but the repetitiveness of living with someone with dementia can be extremely exhausting," Mackenzie said."It's the psychological burden. Different people handle it differently. Some people are very philosophical about it, some people are very traumatized and some are very angry about it - they're angry at their loved one for becoming like that. It's a whole cornucopia of responses." Lycia Rodrigues is from , the province's go-to association for people caring for loved ones at home.Rodrigues said many caregivers feel isolated."Many caregivers call us because they're providing care alone," said Rodrigues, caregiver support and engagement lead."They don't have a lot of information in terms of benefits they can have as caregivers or community support close to where they live." In many cases, she said, caregivers don't chose their new role. They fall into it simply because it's expected that's what a wife, daughter or other family member will do. But because most family members don't have the training to nurse someone at home, they aren't prepared to care for someone with dementia. Of caregivers who used the services in 2017-18 of , 84 per cent were women."One of the challenges we have here is to help caregivers to identify themselves as caregivers," Rodrigues said."They say, 'Oh I'm a daughter, I'm doing what a daughter is supposed to do.' They don't see themselves as caregivers. They can take a long time to ask for support." That can mean the stress continues to build until it takes a toll on the caregiver's health."I have caregivers who say: 'I'm fine, I'm fine.' But they're not. At the end they're the ones who get sick and burn out. We have cases of people having heart attacks and strokes. These are the ones who develop chronic illness after providing care for a long time." The main way for home caregivers to get help is by calling the toll-free Trained staff can help caregivers with everything from navigating the health care system and finding a support group in their area to connecting with one-on-one caregiver coaching and being notified of the next caregiving webinar.A wife, for example, may be in a situation where the care she's providing for her husband is becoming too much to handle. She could be facing a major life decision about whether to transfer a loved one to residential care. She may be feeling guilt or anger or both."Sometimes they say, 'This is the first time I have someone to talk to about what is happening because nobody understands.'" Rodrigues said."When I answer calls, I provide a lot of emotional support." Additional respite help is on the way for home caregivers. On Monday, the provincial government announced it was going to spend $75 million during the next three years on areas such as providing more respite beds and on expanding adult day programs to include evenings and weekends.Between 2016 and 2017, the saw a 36 per cent increase in calls from unpaid caregivers. During that time, caregiver situations have grown more complex.Callers now are more likely to be in situations where they're caring for someone with dementia and diabetes, for example, or Alzheimer's and depression and Parkinson's.Caregivers are reporting the added stress of not having enough money to care for the person they love.Dorothy Housden fits the profile of someone living with dementia and other health issues. Dorothy, who worked as a registered nurse in the maternity ward of Surrey Memorial Hospital until retiring, has dementia but doctors aren't sure what type. She may have a bit of Parkinson's as well as a heart condition known as atrial fibrillation.During a visit by Postmedia, she was alert, smiling and able to respond to some questions. But her son Bill said that as the day progresses, her behaviour can change dramatically.By later in the afternoon she can start shaking so violently, she looks like she's having a seizure. As a way to help, Mila came up with the idea of showing Dorothy videos of babies on YouTube. It calmed her right down.At a meal, her food has to be cut into small pieces but she eats so quickly, there's a danger she may choke. She can become very possessive of her pills and say things like: 'I'm afraid I'm going to be alone at the table all night.'" Bill, 57, and Mila, 51, reassure her that she's not going to be alone but, as Bill says, "It's tough to watch." Bill, a former mechanic, is able to care for his mother because he's disabled himself and retired from work because of a degenerative disc in his back. He and Mila have been sharing caregiving but that's about to change. Mila has found a full-time job. Soon, he'll be taking care of his mom by himself."I may have to ask for some help," he said.Bill doesn't know exactly where to turn. He has a caseworker with Fraser Health, but so far he hasn't used subsidized home care because he's not convinced the amount of help they would receive is worth the $37 an hour they would have to pay.He said it doesn't make sense for him to pay a homecare worker to do tasks such as changing the bed when he can do that himself. But he would welcome help with perineal care. When someone is living with dementia and develops incontinence, the perineal area has to washed daily to prevent infection.He thinks hiring and paying for a nurse privately may be a better way to spend their money.As a break from caregiving, the couple have used twice - most recently for five days at Fort Langley Seniors when Bill was away in Atlanta. They paid the publicly subsidized rate of $37.10 a day; otherwise it would have cost $200 a day. (They can use a maximum 30 respite days a year.) "They took good care of her. She loved it." But Bill sees a problem ahead with Dorothy's adult day program run by in Guildford. Every Tuesday, Dorothy is picked up by 9 a.m. and returned by mid-afternoon. While Bill and Mila get a break, Dorothy meets other seniors, does chair exercises, and has lunch. Bill and Mila pay $9.25 a day for the subsidized program, which would otherwise cost $90 a day. They pay the subsidized rate of $5.70 for a return HandyDart trip (the actual cost is ).The big service the day program provides is showering Dorothy. Neither Bill nor Mila can wash her properly in their cramped basement bathroom.You can hear the stress in Bill's voice when he says: "It's getting to the point where they can't handle her. I don't know how long we're going to be able to do that." Dorothy enjoys the day program so much, Bill would like her to go twice a week. But because there's such a demand for spaces, one day a week is all that's available for her."I think there needs to be more funding for it," he said."The interaction is good for her. Sitting and knitting and sitting in front of the TV all day is pretty tough I think." 31: percentage of home caregivers experiencing distress which includes feeling angry or depressed 36: percentage increase in the number of calls to the Caregiver Support line during past year from 425 to 577 44: number of home caregiver support groups across the province 91: percentage of home caregivers who are family members, with adult children, a spouse, and other family members ranking 1,2,3 216: percentage increase in the number of one-on-one family caregiving coaching sessions between 2016 and 2017 1,000,000: estimated number of people in B.C. providing unpaid home care to people with dementia and other illnesses 3,500,000,000: estimated value in dollars in B.C. of unpaid care provided by volunteer home caregivers.-Sources:and The toll-free . It's open five days a week, 8:30 am to 4 pm.It's designed for anyone taking care of a family member or friend in a home setting. Experienced staff can help callers with finding resources and navigating the health care system.The Caregiver Support Line is operated by , which has a website with information that includes how to get help, resources that are available, and where to find support groups.
Best Hospital Bed for Quality Sleep
A group of smart people thought of another way to stay comfortable when they are traveling. By using their smart phones, they can check out the hotel bed and guest bed options in a particular city. They can also book the best hotel room for guests and keep track of their daily budget while traveling.This section of the article is about the best hotels in Los Angeles for travelers. This type of content needs to be relevant to a specific audience and need a clear structure. It helps the company generate revenue consistently.We can see that the AI system is able to generate large numbers of unique content ideas and engage with its users. It knows what it likes and it is able to recall information from long periods of time.Most importantly, AI provides efficient content ideas by generating a large number of hits in a short period of time. This means that content will be accepted by the users quickly and also acts as a support mechanism for the user when he or she needs help with his or her articles. This feature is also beneficial for site owners as they do not have to manage all their team members’ time and effort but can focus on managing the traffic generated by their site without having to spend too much time on it. They can take some time off to be with their loved ones who are sick or going throughBest Hospital Bed is a unique bed, with its high headboard. It is made of a special fabric with high durability and softness for the best sleep.For the sake of health and safety, it should be used by all professionals in hospital or clinic.Best Hospital Bed is made to be used by doctors, nurses and other healthcare professionals. It also has a built-in computer monitor that shows vital signs for each patient. The bed can be operated remotely using an app on your smart phone and TV. Best Hospital Bed also has digital buttons in case you want to turn on or off the bed itself or control how much sleep the patient gets at night being monitored through his smartphone app as well as through the web based application available on Google Play Store or Apple App store .Best Hospital Bed, Best Hospital Bed for Sale, Best Hospital Bed for RentWe should not think of these hospital beds as a replacement for human bed makers. They are simply a tool that helps content writers generate content ideas and then helps them make relevant decisions on the best material to use in their blog posts or web pages. The content is generated by the content writers themselves and is not necessarily written in an expert manner.Nobody is better than the hospital. They can offer the best healthcare treatment to their patients at affordable price.Best Hospital Bed for Sale, Best Hospital Bed for Rent, Best Hospital Bed Not for Sale, Best Hospital Bed Not for Rent are examples of headlines that got featured on top search engines like Google in order to get maximum exposure.Bed is a type of furniture that is used in hospitals to provide comfort and wellbeing to patients. There are different types of beds available in the market like hospital beds, motel beds, air mattresses and so on. These are all designed for different purposes and different lifestyles. The customers need to choose the best bed according to the lifestyle they have and this will help them decide which one is suitable for them.The choice of the right bed and guest beds for a traveler is an important factor to be considered. A well-decorated bed, with comfortable cushions and pillows, will make the journey more comfortable.The world of travel is getting more and more crowded with the ever-increasing number of people wanting to visit or stay in various different countries. With a growing demand for a better, cleaner and stylish environment, hotels are finding it hard to satisfy their customers (especially at high altitude). The choice between the best hotel in Europe or Asia - like in Singapore - and an expensive hotel in South America is notoriously difficult.However, when it comes to choosing your hotel on a trip abroad, there are several factors that you should consider first.
'Guardian Angel' for Paraplegic
After Rick Byquist retired, he rewarded himself with a golf cart."Even though I'm not very good, the third hole on the golf course became my second home," said the 68-year-old.Last year, Byquist rewarded himself with stained glass brushes instead, a hobby that requires less walking.Byquist became a paraplegic after collapsing at his computer desk a year ago.The Winnipeg resident was rushed to hospital where he was diagnosed with level seven of prostate cancer."I kept up a positive attitude," he said. "I pushed myself to try and be better. I always asked myself 'What can I do differently today?' " With the help of the Canadian Paraplegic Association, Byquist was able to maintain his positive attitude."People with spinal cord injuries will have the opportunity to be equal and valued in all aspects of society," said a spokesperson for the CPA.The CPA has been offering support and information to people with spinal cord injuries in Manitoba since 1946.The non-profit organization came to Byquist's hospital bed and volunteered their services shortly after he was diagnosed.Seven months later, Byquist was able to feel his toes again."I got my strength back; it was an early Christmas present," he said. "The kinks compressed and I got the message through to my feet." Rehabilitation counsellors from the CPA visit with clients such as Byquist every week and help motivate patients to relearn how to walk.Last year, the CPA rehabilitated over 400 clients across the province."They cheer you on. It's a miracle I can do this," he said, walking with two canes across the kitchen floor. "I feel like I've won the lottery." United Way has been working with the CPA since 1978 and has donated hundreds of dollars to help fund both quality and professional services to Manitobans who have spinal cord injuries."There's not a chance I would be here today without the CPA," Byquist said, showing off his stained glass painting of the Winnipeg Jets logo on an iPad. "It's like trying to be a hockey player without a coach; you just won't get there without them." This fall, Byquist has started chemotherapy treatment, but is confident he will be working on his golf game soon enough."I would still be in a wheelchair if it wasn't for the help of the CPA," said Byquist with a grin on his face. "The CPA is my guardian angel."
Moncton Woman Lodges Complaint About Nursing Care During 'nightmare' Hospital Stay
Patty Musgrave, who has osteoarthritis, has had four joint replacement surgeries since 2013 and has seen nursing care for patients at the Moncton Hospital go steadily downhill.Musgrave lodged a complaint after having her knee replaced in April and spendingthree days in a hospital bed "at the mercy" of health care workers on the sixth floor."Moncton Hospital orthopedic floor is a nightmare. Plain and simple," she wrote in her letter of complaint. I've come home with a renewed realization that we are understaffed in our hospitals and it is turning caregivers into really nasty people. - Patty Musgrave During her latesthospital visit, Musgrave found herself hesitating toask the nurses for help with going to the bathroom or for pain medication because their reaction made her feel as though she was "bothering them.""As far as pain goes, I probably let it go longer because I didn't want to press that button. And when they come around the corner and they look at you - it's like I did something wrong. And I'm 54."Musgrave said the frustration of nurses every time she and her elderly roommate called for help was evident."At one point upon calling for pain meds, one nurse offered me this information. 'I am really busy and can't be running back here over and over. I'venot even had supper yet.'"Musgrave said her roommate, who had been a patient on the sixthfloor for weeks,looked over and told her,"That's what it's like here.""I felt, like, 'Wow, I'm sure you didn't become a nurse to treat me like this.'"Patients try to co-ordinate bed pan callsMusgrave said while she hadno trouble speaking up for herself during her short stay, she was troubled bythe way her 74-year-old roommate was treated."She was too afraid to press the button. Sometimes I would press it for her because she was crying. She was in a lot of pain and when she needed the bed pan she was scared to call for it."Musgrave said the nurses were so obviously overwhelmed, that she and her roommate "had to co-ordinate our bed pan needs."For her, the other thing that was "really awful" was that she came home with a "huge bedsore," which had never happened before."When you're using a bed pan, sometimes you miss," Musgrave laughed. "So the bed had gotten wet. I told a nurse, she put a soaker pad over the wet sheet ... I ended up having three soaker pads underneath me."Her hospital bed was never changed, and she was not able to wash,until a friend who is a home care worker came to visit on her second day in the hospital.It was her friendwho helped her out of bed, washed her, treated her bedsore and changed the sheets."She went and asked for sheets and clean items and was told where to go get them butnot offered any assistance whatsoever. So then she changed my bed and got everything dried and got that sore looked at."Musgrave said the bedsore has since healed, thanks to the extramural nurses who visited her at home every two days to treat it."I've come home with a renewed realization that we are understaffed in our hospitals and it is turning caregivers into really nasty people."Moncton Hospital respondsMusgrave recently heard back from the nurse manager and the patient advocate at the Moncton Hospital.She was told that there had been a staff meeting about her letter of complaint and that nurses were checking on her 74-year-old former roommate as Musgravehad requested."I really hope my roommate is being cared for in a good way and considering her only family is an elderly brother, I hope she is getting the care she deserves," she wrote in her letter.Musgrave was also told by the nurse manager thataccording to her medical chart, everything looked fine and there was no record of her asking to talk to a doctor about pain relief, something she said the nurse refused.No one from the Horizon Health Network was willing to do an interview about Musgrave's concerns, but vice-president Geri Geldartdid send a written statement."We sincerely apologize for her negative experience during her stay. We have followed up directly with the staff who provided care, and we will utilize the feedback she shared to improve our care and services moving forward."'What's happening to our nursing staff?'Since returning home to recover, Musgrave has had a lot of time to reflect on her hospital stay."What's happening to our nursing staff on that floor? Why are they so overwhelmed?"She is calling on the Moncton Hospital to hire a nurse practitioner or hospitalist for the sixth floor. A hospitalist is a doctor who is dedicated to caring for patients in the hospital."If we had a hospitalist or even a nurse practitioner on that floor, I don't think we'd have the issues that we do because they would be able to take over the day-to-day management or case management of each patient."Instead of nurses spending time trying to reach already busy surgeons, Musgrave argues the dedicated hospitalist or nurse practitioner could make adjustments to care and medication quickly."So there's no big delay. The nurses aren't going to have to take time from care of the patients to make 50 phone calls to the doctor to get that changed, this changed, whatever," she said."Take some of the work off the nurses so that they can be the personality they set out to be instead of this overwhelmed person."
Fire at Bangladesh Clothing Factory Kills at Least 112 (VIDEO, PHOTOS)
­The death toll from the blaze on the outskirts of Bangladesh's capital Dhaka rose after rescuers discovered more bodies in the ruins."We've found 112 dead bodies this morning," Mohammad Mahbub, a fire brigade director, told AFP. "We resumed our search this morning and found the bodies lying on different floors of the factory building."Fireman battled the flames for over five hours after the fire broke out late Saturday. The inferno began on the ground floor, trapping night workers inside the seven-story building.The workers' relatives frantically searched for their loved ones. Sabina Yasmine, a worker at another factory, told AP she found her daughter-in-law dead, but couldn't locate her son."Oh, Allah, where's my soul Where's my son" Yasmine wailed. "I want the factory owner to be hanged. For him, many have died, many have gone."­Police reported that many workers, most of whom were women, leaped from the factory's upper floor to escape the fire and smoke."There were more than 1,000 workers trapped in the factory," one worker told local media from her hospital bed. "I jumped from a window on the fourth floor and found myself on the third-storey roof of another building. Several people fell out of the window and died."Mahbub said that most of the victims were on the second floor."Those who could not jump died due to suffocation. The factory had three exits but since the fire was on the ground floor, workers could not come downstairs," he told AFP.Some of the victims were burned beyond recognition. Authorities kept the recovered bodies in rows next to a nearby school before turning over those identified to the relatives.Firefighters managed to find and rescue some of the workers who had found places of shelter inside the factory. Army soldiers and paramilitary border guards were deployed in the area as onlookers and grieving relatives gathered at the scene.The cause of the inferno remains unclear. South Asian nations generally have notoriously poor safety records, and many fires start due to shortcuts in faulty electric equipment.Factory owner Delwar Hossain insisted that there were no safety problems at his property."It is a huge loss for my staff and my factory. This is the first time we have ever had a fire at one of my seven factories," he saidTwo years ago, a similar blaze in another garment factory triggered by a wiring problem killed at least 25 people.Textiles compose up to 80 percent of annual exports in Bangladesh, which total $24 billion. The country has around 4,000 garment factories, which use cheap local labor to secure markets for their products. The primary buyers of their products are the United States and Europe.
Fire at Bangladesh Clothing Factory Kills at Least 112 (VIDEO, PHOTOS)
­The death toll from the blaze on the outskirts of Bangladesh's capital Dhaka rose after rescuers discovered more bodies in the ruins."We've found 112 dead bodies this morning," Mohammad Mahbub, a fire brigade director, told AFP. "We resumed our search this morning and found the bodies lying on different floors of the factory building."Fireman battled the flames for over five hours after the fire broke out late Saturday. The inferno began on the ground floor, trapping night workers inside the seven-story building.The workers' relatives frantically searched for their loved ones. Sabina Yasmine, a worker at another factory, told AP she found her daughter-in-law dead, but couldn't locate her son."Oh, Allah, where's my soul Where's my son" Yasmine wailed. "I want the factory owner to be hanged. For him, many have died, many have gone."­Police reported that many workers, most of whom were women, leaped from the factory's upper floor to escape the fire and smoke."There were more than 1,000 workers trapped in the factory," one worker told local media from her hospital bed. "I jumped from a window on the fourth floor and found myself on the third-storey roof of another building. Several people fell out of the window and died."Mahbub said that most of the victims were on the second floor."Those who could not jump died due to suffocation. The factory had three exits but since the fire was on the ground floor, workers could not come downstairs," he told AFP.Some of the victims were burned beyond recognition. Authorities kept the recovered bodies in rows next to a nearby school before turning over those identified to the relatives.Firefighters managed to find and rescue some of the workers who had found places of shelter inside the factory. Army soldiers and paramilitary border guards were deployed in the area as onlookers and grieving relatives gathered at the scene.The cause of the inferno remains unclear. South Asian nations generally have notoriously poor safety records, and many fires start due to shortcuts in faulty electric equipment.Factory owner Delwar Hossain insisted that there were no safety problems at his property."It is a huge loss for my staff and my factory. This is the first time we have ever had a fire at one of my seven factories," he saidTwo years ago, a similar blaze in another garment factory triggered by a wiring problem killed at least 25 people.Textiles compose up to 80 percent of annual exports in Bangladesh, which total $24 billion. The country has around 4,000 garment factories, which use cheap local labor to secure markets for their products. The primary buyers of their products are the United States and Europe.
Countries Where You Don't Want to Wake Up in Hospital
Big risk ... That's what you are taking by travelling without insurance.Source:News LimitedOVERSEAS hotel rooms have nothing on the cost of a hospital bed in some countries, with sick or injured travellers forking out close to $900 a night for treatment. A list designed to scare travellers into taking out insurance before heading abroad shows Singapore is the most expensive place in which to fall ill, with the average cost of a hospital bed sitting at $893 a night.The US was next, with travellers expected to cough up $751 for every day spent in hospital, more than a three-bedroom apartment in glamour ski resort Aspen.Pricey ... Singapore is the most expensive city in the world for Aussies to fall ill, with a hospital bed costing almost $900 a night for uninsured travellers. Picture: iStockSource:SuppliedHong Kong, the Netherlands and Canada also charged in excess of $600 a night for hospital care and the UK, Germany, France and Japan were not far behind.Rounding out the top 10 most expensive destinations for hospital beds was Spain, where inpatients faced a $486 a night bill.In comparison the cost of taking out insurance for travel to those countries ranged from around $100 for the US and Canada, to a tick over $72 for Singapore visitors.Costly illness ... The cost of a hospital bed in some overseas countries is enough to make you sick. Picture: ThinkstockSource:SuppliedConsumer advocate at finder.com.au, Bessie Hassan, said the data was compiled from more than 10,000 anonymised quotes through finder's travel insurance comparison service."While many sensible travellers will find cover before they leave for holidays, there will inevitably be some who ditch travel insurance altogether," said Ms Hassan."The reality is, if you're overlooking insurance, you're taking a gamble."Sure, nothing may go wrong, but on the off chance you do fall ill, travel insurance may end up being the best value-for-money decision."She said it was worth noting that the figures provided were just the cost for the hospital bed."These figures don't take into account other transportation, medicine or surgery costs that may also fall under your insurance policy - or for uninsured travellers, boost their medical bill," Ms Hassan said.Notorious ... the US was second only to Singapore as the place with the most expensive hospital beds. Picture: California Travel & Tourism CommissionSource:SuppliedAnother point to consider was that injuries incurred while intoxicated or under the influence of drugs, were unlikely to be covered by insurance."As much as it's common sense to take out cover, it also goes without saying you need to travel responsibly," she said.It is estimated that as many as one in five Australian travellers head overseas without insurance, or with inadequate insurance for the activities they plan to undertake.The figures are higher for places like Bali where travellers assume they will simply be able to fly home if things go wrong.The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade advises people if "they can't afford travel insurance, they can't afford to travel".
The Most Innovative Hospital Bed
The introduction of hospital bedHospital beds are essential when you need to take care of a sick or injured person. They are used for several reasons like in cases of emergencies, for elderly patients, and during surgery. But the main reason why we use hospital beds is to sleep.Many people think that hospitals only provide comfortable bed to their patients.Tips for hospital bedThis introduction is about tips for hospital bed.How to use hospital bed?In the past, hospitals used to be very expensive. But nowadays, they are not even needed anymore.The specifications of hospital bedA bed is a piece of furniture that can be put in a room. It provides comfort for the patient. It also needs to be sturdy enough to support the weight of the patient and avoid them getting injured during their stay at the hospital.The specification of a bed is very complex and comes with many specifications. There are different kinds of beds available that all need to be met within certain parameters like minimum/maximum bed height, length and number of holes or slots for drainage, etc.In order to meet these specifications, there are different types of beds available such as inflatable ones, folding ones etc. However these do not provide any comfort which is one reason why patients stay in hospitals instead of their homes since they cannot sit comfortably on an inflatable bed all day long! So hospitals have startedThe product instructions of hospital bedThese are instructions that a patient will receive on the hospital bed in case of emergency.The application of hospital bedBy using the latest AI technologies, we can make hospitals more efficient and get a better service.
Why Liberty's Hugh Freeze Coached From a Hospital Bed
Liberty football kicked off their college football season Saturday by hosting a ranked Syracuse team, and while Liberty coach Hugh Freeze was confined to a hospital bed as he recovered from serious health issues, he didn't miss the Flames' season opener.Freeze - who took the Liberty job last December, two months before the NCAA vacated 33 of his wins at Ole Miss - underwent surgery on August 16th to address a severe staph infection that was life-threatening, according to Syracuse.com.As of a few days ago, Freeze wasn't sure if he'd be well enough to attend the game, and his movement was limited. The Associated Press reported that Liberty had set up Freeze to oversee practices from a hotel room, and the coach communicated with players via walkie-talkies.Even back surgery can't keep @CoachHughFreeze from coaching his @LibertyFootball team. But now he's doing it from a nearby hotel room! pic.twitter.com/urdVjeAwAK- Game On LU (@GameOnLU) August 22, 2019On game day, Freeze delivered a pregame speech and monitored the game from a bed in the coaches' box.Coaching from a hospital bed, @CoachHughFreeze gets @LibertyFootball fired up to take on @CuseFootball. TougherTogether pic.twitter.com/f5IPQmESpZ- Game On LU (@GameOnLU) August 31, 2019Here's Hugh Freeze coaching from his hospital bed pic.twitter.com/SSURR2KErM- Yahoo Sports College Football (@YahooSportsCFB) August 31, 2019Here's a look at Hugh Freeze's seat in the coaches' booth.Freeze will essentially videoconference with his team pregame and at halftime and do so during postgame press conference. The plan is to fly him to Louisiana next week to be with the team on the road. pic.twitter.com/YA1HAXiQ43- Nate Mink (@MinkNate) August 31, 2019
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