High Gloss

2. Gagarin stools, £125 each, from Andrew Martin; 020 7225 5100.3. Eames DAR chair, £263, from Twentytwentyone; 020 7837 1900.4. Ming porcelain and PVC vase, £295, by Fredrikson Stallard; 020 7254 9933.5. Vintage salad bowl, £21, by Guzzini, from Forma House; 020 8646 9655.6. Rug #1 in black urethane, £1,000, from Fredrikson Stallard, as before.7. Louis side table, £195, by John Reeves, from Heal's; 020 7636 1666.8. Mabelle dining chair, £235, from Aram; 020 7557 7557.9. Sideboard, from a selection, by Cappellini, from Chaplins; 020 7323 6552.10. Spun table lamp, £405, by Sebastian Wrong for Flos, from SCP; 020 7739 1869, www.scp.co.uk.

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Dining Chair From a 2x4
Before I even realised the 2x4 competition was going on, I had a spare 2x4 and had been watching far too many of Paul Sellers' woodworking videos, which had filled my head with delusions of being a proper woodworker. It struck me that there are plenty of "rustic garden chair from a 2x4" type guides around but not many making something a bit more refined-looking. I wanted a project to practise my carpentry skills on so I thought why not see if I could make a decent-looking indoor chair from a single 2x4? Here's how I got on.The first step was to figure out a rough design for the chair and work out if I could actually get that much usable wood from one 2x4. Here in metric-land, rough softwood timber comes in pieces about 2440 x 95 x 45mm, roughly 8' x 1 3/4" x 3 3/4". When I talk about "2x2" or "2x1" I mean the resulting size from resawing that wood into halves or quarters, though it isn't that exact size in inches.The basic plan was to cut the wood into three sections: a 50cm piece I would resaw into two 2x2 for the front legs, a 90cm piece that would provide two 2x2 for the back and back legs, and a 100cm piece I would resaw into four 2x1 strips that would then form the rest of the frame- the seat sides, stretcher and back spindles/rails.I figured out that I could get three 30cm pieces, six 40cm pieces and three 20cm pieces which would let me build the frame of a reasonably sized chair. The third image here shows the cut list to provide those lengths.The part where I went totally off-piste was the back angle. The back of a dining chair should slope backwards at about 8 degrees, which sane people achieve by cutting a shape out of a larger piece of wood, but this would result in far too much waste. I had to figure out a way to take a single continuous 2x2 and introduce a shallow bend into the middle.I'm new to the whole chair anatomy thing- the final image shows the words I'm using for various parts of the chair, which I may well be using incorrectly but it beats calling them "vertical back part" and "horizontal back part".Step one was to cut the entire 2x4 into the lengths I wanted: 50cm, 90cm and 100cm. A tape measure, pencil and mitre saw made quick work of this.Once I had the lengths I needed I had to resaw them into thinner pieces. Any sane woodworker would use a table saw to do this, but I don't have a table saw so had to improvise. I fitted a 4 tooth-per-inch blade on the bandsaw as a general purpose blade can't cut this thickness of wood without clogging. I also clamped a feather board to the table and clamped both ends of the fence to try and keep it cutting as square as possible.It's important to get the cut in the middle of the wood so the two resulting pieces are the same size - to do this I made a short cut into one end, then measured the distance from the fence to the cut, and adjusted the position of the fence until the saw was going to leave the same amount of wood on both sides.When resawing long pieces of wood on a small bandsaw you'll end up with the weight of the board hanging off the far end, which is bad news. If possible, find an assistant to support the wood coming out of the cut to avoid having to reach around the blade. I wouldn't advise resawing this way, but if you do do it, pay attention and be safe!Once you've resawed to the width you need, cut the 2x1s down to the lengths from the cut list and you have your raw lengths ready for cleaning up.Cutting a thick piece of softwood on a cheap bandsaw with a coarse blade will probably result in wavy cuts. This job was no exception. I took the wavy wood over to a bench vise and planed down the cut surfaces until smooth. You could use a powered sander here instead of a plane, but be careful not to take off too much material.After dry fitting the back together to see how it looked, I began to feel like I was just creating another boxy square design without any of those decorative flourishes that set fine furniture apart from its rustic and flatpack cousins. Before I started assembling the chair I decided to:- Cut some cutouts from the spindles to make them more slender-looking- Cut a slight radius into the top and bottom railsTo make the cutouts on the spindles, I made a template out of a scrap of plywood, used this to draw the cut lines on the spindles and cut them out on the bandsaw. The template for the top and bottom curve on the rails could be drawn freehand but I cheated and cut this one on the laser cutter.I also clamped the three spindles together and sanded a slight radius into the ends with the nose of a belt sander, so they would be tapered slightly where they met the rails - this again makes them look a bit more slender, and also hides any slight misalignment as I was still honing my dowel-joint-making skills at this point.Continuing the little design touches, I decided to- Taper the bottom section of the legs down to a smaller "foot"- Chamfer the top parts of the legs into a pyramid so they don't just terminate in a square endTo chamfer the tops of the legs, I used a woodworking gauge to divide the top of each leg into thirds (like a tic-tac-toe board) and scribed a line 5mm down from the top edge, and cut the four bevels on the bandsaw.To taper the bottom of each leg, I needed to cut two wedges out on adjacent sides. To do this I had to mark and cut one wedge, then mark the second one on the cut face. Each wedge is 150mm x 15mm so the foot is about half the area of the leg which seemed to look like the right proportions.This part was done more as a personal challenge to myself and to see whether I could make the chair from a single 2x4 worth of wood. The sensible way to make a back leg with a bend in it would be to trace the outline on a piece of 2x4 wood and cut it out. I only had two straight 2x2s which I needed to introduce a bend into, so I decided to cut them at an angle and rotate one of the pieces, so I could glue them back together with a lap joint at an angle.The 90cm 2x2 wouldn't fit in the bandsaw and I couldn't reliably get a perfectly straight cut on it anyway. This is another part of the process which would have been much easier with a table saw. As it is, I had to clamp the 2x2 between two workbenches, and clamp a long straightedge to it at a 10 degree angle to guide the jigsaw. 10 degrees is more angle than I would have liked, but anything shallower would have made the cut impractically long - each cut was about 25cm long and took several minutes of painstaking jigsawing, but I ended up with a cut surface that was flat enough to glue up. These joints were the only ones that used screws, because just clamping them together resulted in the two halves sliding apart, so I drilled and countersunk two holes through each joint to accept wood screws that held the two halves in the right position while the glue dried.With all the pieces made, it was time to start assembling. The easiest way to assemble a chair of this shape is to glue the back together as one piece, and the front similarly, then attach the two parts of the frame together with the sides of the seat and stretchers. The first part to be assembled was the back. To make the dowel joints I'd drill two 28mm deep, 9mm diameter holes into the ends of the spindles and the sides of the rails, and glue a 50mm section of 9mm dowel into the joints. The holes were deeper than they needed to be to allow a little room for glue at the ends.Having done this the hard way, I'd recommend drilling the holes into the ends of the spindles, measuring their position and drilling the corresponding holes in the rails, because drilling accurately placed holes into the softwood end grain was tricky.Gluing the back together required a bit of ingenuity as I didn't have a single bar clamp long enough - I'd really recommend you figure this sort of thing out before starting as it's quite stressful trying to improvise clamping arrangements while the glue is drying!I also drilled the holes for the stretcher, but didn't glue it up on its own. I made sure to drill the holes in the ends of the side arms of the stretcher so they were pointing straight forward/back in the chair, which made assembling the frame much easier than if they were drilled straight into the ends.Right. Take a deep breath and mentally prepare yourself. Lay everything you need out where it's accessible: a glue pot, spreader stick, lots of paper towel for wiping up squeezeout, enough dowels of the appropriate lengths and all the frame pieces.Glue the holes in the stretcher, insert dowels and fit it together.Place the back of the chair on the workbench facing up, glue all the holes and insert dowels. Glue the protruding ends of these dowels, and fit the stretcher onto the lower set of dowels. Glue up the seat sides and fit them onto the upper dowels.Add glue to the exposed holes in the side parts you just added, insert and glue up the remaining dowels, and fit the front legs onto those. Take a breath. Make sure all the joints are fully pushed together with as little gap as you can manage - a little persuasion with a mallet can help out, but don't go wild on it. Set the chair upright on its legs and make sure it's not crooked or twisted. You can add a strap clamp or bar clamps to hold it all together while it dries.Admire the chair from all angles - this step is important.Once this was done, I grabbed a piece of plywood and jigsawed a seat to fit over the seat sides with corners cut out for the legs. The idea was to upholster this with fabric and upholstery foam (inspired by, naturally, Paul Sellers' video on how to upholster a chair seat which came out when I was half way through making this chair) but I ran out of time for the contest deadline so for now a seat pad will have to do. And I was trying to make something that didn't look like garden furniture...Despite all this, a piece of simple everyday furniture from scratch is definitely one of the more rewarding things I've made, and I'm sure I'll build more in future. Hopefully this goes to show just how far you can make a 2x4 go with some ingenuity and a healthy disregard of practical limitations :)
Dining Chair From a 2x4
Before I even realised the 2x4 competition was going on, I had a spare 2x4 and had been watching far too many of Paul Sellers' woodworking videos, which had filled my head with delusions of being a proper woodworker. It struck me that there are plenty of "rustic garden chair from a 2x4" type guides around but not many making something a bit more refined-looking. I wanted a project to practise my carpentry skills on so I thought why not see if I could make a decent-looking indoor chair from a single 2x4? Here's how I got on.The first step was to figure out a rough design for the chair and work out if I could actually get that much usable wood from one 2x4. Here in metric-land, rough softwood timber comes in pieces about 2440 x 95 x 45mm, roughly 8' x 1 3/4" x 3 3/4". When I talk about "2x2" or "2x1" I mean the resulting size from resawing that wood into halves or quarters, though it isn't that exact size in inches.The basic plan was to cut the wood into three sections: a 50cm piece I would resaw into two 2x2 for the front legs, a 90cm piece that would provide two 2x2 for the back and back legs, and a 100cm piece I would resaw into four 2x1 strips that would then form the rest of the frame- the seat sides, stretcher and back spindles/rails.I figured out that I could get three 30cm pieces, six 40cm pieces and three 20cm pieces which would let me build the frame of a reasonably sized chair. The third image here shows the cut list to provide those lengths.The part where I went totally off-piste was the back angle. The back of a dining chair should slope backwards at about 8 degrees, which sane people achieve by cutting a shape out of a larger piece of wood, but this would result in far too much waste. I had to figure out a way to take a single continuous 2x2 and introduce a shallow bend into the middle.I'm new to the whole chair anatomy thing- the final image shows the words I'm using for various parts of the chair, which I may well be using incorrectly but it beats calling them "vertical back part" and "horizontal back part".Step one was to cut the entire 2x4 into the lengths I wanted: 50cm, 90cm and 100cm. A tape measure, pencil and mitre saw made quick work of this.Once I had the lengths I needed I had to resaw them into thinner pieces. Any sane woodworker would use a table saw to do this, but I don't have a table saw so had to improvise. I fitted a 4 tooth-per-inch blade on the bandsaw as a general purpose blade can't cut this thickness of wood without clogging. I also clamped a feather board to the table and clamped both ends of the fence to try and keep it cutting as square as possible.It's important to get the cut in the middle of the wood so the two resulting pieces are the same size - to do this I made a short cut into one end, then measured the distance from the fence to the cut, and adjusted the position of the fence until the saw was going to leave the same amount of wood on both sides.When resawing long pieces of wood on a small bandsaw you'll end up with the weight of the board hanging off the far end, which is bad news. If possible, find an assistant to support the wood coming out of the cut to avoid having to reach around the blade. I wouldn't advise resawing this way, but if you do do it, pay attention and be safe!Once you've resawed to the width you need, cut the 2x1s down to the lengths from the cut list and you have your raw lengths ready for cleaning up.Cutting a thick piece of softwood on a cheap bandsaw with a coarse blade will probably result in wavy cuts. This job was no exception. I took the wavy wood over to a bench vise and planed down the cut surfaces until smooth. You could use a powered sander here instead of a plane, but be careful not to take off too much material.After dry fitting the back together to see how it looked, I began to feel like I was just creating another boxy square design without any of those decorative flourishes that set fine furniture apart from its rustic and flatpack cousins. Before I started assembling the chair I decided to:- Cut some cutouts from the spindles to make them more slender-looking- Cut a slight radius into the top and bottom railsTo make the cutouts on the spindles, I made a template out of a scrap of plywood, used this to draw the cut lines on the spindles and cut them out on the bandsaw. The template for the top and bottom curve on the rails could be drawn freehand but I cheated and cut this one on the laser cutter.I also clamped the three spindles together and sanded a slight radius into the ends with the nose of a belt sander, so they would be tapered slightly where they met the rails - this again makes them look a bit more slender, and also hides any slight misalignment as I was still honing my dowel-joint-making skills at this point.Continuing the little design touches, I decided to- Taper the bottom section of the legs down to a smaller "foot"- Chamfer the top parts of the legs into a pyramid so they don't just terminate in a square endTo chamfer the tops of the legs, I used a woodworking gauge to divide the top of each leg into thirds (like a tic-tac-toe board) and scribed a line 5mm down from the top edge, and cut the four bevels on the bandsaw.To taper the bottom of each leg, I needed to cut two wedges out on adjacent sides. To do this I had to mark and cut one wedge, then mark the second one on the cut face. Each wedge is 150mm x 15mm so the foot is about half the area of the leg which seemed to look like the right proportions.This part was done more as a personal challenge to myself and to see whether I could make the chair from a single 2x4 worth of wood. The sensible way to make a back leg with a bend in it would be to trace the outline on a piece of 2x4 wood and cut it out. I only had two straight 2x2s which I needed to introduce a bend into, so I decided to cut them at an angle and rotate one of the pieces, so I could glue them back together with a lap joint at an angle.The 90cm 2x2 wouldn't fit in the bandsaw and I couldn't reliably get a perfectly straight cut on it anyway. This is another part of the process which would have been much easier with a table saw. As it is, I had to clamp the 2x2 between two workbenches, and clamp a long straightedge to it at a 10 degree angle to guide the jigsaw. 10 degrees is more angle than I would have liked, but anything shallower would have made the cut impractically long - each cut was about 25cm long and took several minutes of painstaking jigsawing, but I ended up with a cut surface that was flat enough to glue up. These joints were the only ones that used screws, because just clamping them together resulted in the two halves sliding apart, so I drilled and countersunk two holes through each joint to accept wood screws that held the two halves in the right position while the glue dried.With all the pieces made, it was time to start assembling. The easiest way to assemble a chair of this shape is to glue the back together as one piece, and the front similarly, then attach the two parts of the frame together with the sides of the seat and stretchers. The first part to be assembled was the back. To make the dowel joints I'd drill two 28mm deep, 9mm diameter holes into the ends of the spindles and the sides of the rails, and glue a 50mm section of 9mm dowel into the joints. The holes were deeper than they needed to be to allow a little room for glue at the ends.Having done this the hard way, I'd recommend drilling the holes into the ends of the spindles, measuring their position and drilling the corresponding holes in the rails, because drilling accurately placed holes into the softwood end grain was tricky.Gluing the back together required a bit of ingenuity as I didn't have a single bar clamp long enough - I'd really recommend you figure this sort of thing out before starting as it's quite stressful trying to improvise clamping arrangements while the glue is drying!I also drilled the holes for the stretcher, but didn't glue it up on its own. I made sure to drill the holes in the ends of the side arms of the stretcher so they were pointing straight forward/back in the chair, which made assembling the frame much easier than if they were drilled straight into the ends.Right. Take a deep breath and mentally prepare yourself. Lay everything you need out where it's accessible: a glue pot, spreader stick, lots of paper towel for wiping up squeezeout, enough dowels of the appropriate lengths and all the frame pieces.Glue the holes in the stretcher, insert dowels and fit it together.Place the back of the chair on the workbench facing up, glue all the holes and insert dowels. Glue the protruding ends of these dowels, and fit the stretcher onto the lower set of dowels. Glue up the seat sides and fit them onto the upper dowels.Add glue to the exposed holes in the side parts you just added, insert and glue up the remaining dowels, and fit the front legs onto those. Take a breath. Make sure all the joints are fully pushed together with as little gap as you can manage - a little persuasion with a mallet can help out, but don't go wild on it. Set the chair upright on its legs and make sure it's not crooked or twisted. You can add a strap clamp or bar clamps to hold it all together while it dries.Admire the chair from all angles - this step is important.Once this was done, I grabbed a piece of plywood and jigsawed a seat to fit over the seat sides with corners cut out for the legs. The idea was to upholster this with fabric and upholstery foam (inspired by, naturally, Paul Sellers' video on how to upholster a chair seat which came out when I was half way through making this chair) but I ran out of time for the contest deadline so for now a seat pad will have to do. And I was trying to make something that didn't look like garden furniture...Despite all this, a piece of simple everyday furniture from scratch is definitely one of the more rewarding things I've made, and I'm sure I'll build more in future. Hopefully this goes to show just how far you can make a 2x4 go with some ingenuity and a healthy disregard of practical limitations :)
Nearly a Month After Son of Roselle Park Couple Drowns, Many Questions Remain Unanswered
Ryan Koranteng-Barnes was 2 years old and less than 3 feet tall, with one good hand. The pool he drowned in was 4 feet above ground with no ladder and no other way to climb in, relatives say.While authorities say the Roselle Park toddler's death appears accidental, Koranteng-Barnes' parents are convinced something else contributed to their son's drowning. They are asking for witnesses to step forward to help explain how their youngest son died in a neighbor's backyard on June 25."I've been searching for answers, and nobody wants to give me any," said Ebo Koranteng-Barnes, Ryan's father.The Union County Prosecutor's Office and the Roselle Park police have both said their investigation remains open, but they do not suspect foul play in the child's death."While it does not appear suspicious, the homicide task force is continuing to interview people, including potential witnesses, and is waiting on a report from the medical examiner's office," Prosecutor Theodore Romankow said.Ryan was playing with his older brother, Ferdinand, and his mother during a block party last month when he disappeared into a neighbor's backyard, his father said. The Koranteng-Barneses and the owners of the home where the child vanished - Tony and Ida Martins - searched frantically for the boy, finding him unconscious in the pool minutes later.Neighbors tried to revive Ryan, but he was pronounced dead at the scene, Koranteng-Barnes and police said.With his left hand deformed because of a birth defect, Ryan would not have been able to climb in by himself, his family said, and the pool did not have a ladder attached to it."I saw it with my naked eyes, the ladder was at least two feet away from the pool," Koranteng-Barnes said. "My son cannot even sit on a dining chair by himself."The Martins' pool should not have been filled either, because it had not been inspected by the town, according to Steve Greenstein, an attorney for the Koranteng-Barnes family.On June 2, Tony Martins was served with a municipal violation informing him the pool should not have been filled, according to a document provided by Greenstein.The child's father believes someone helped his son enter the pool, but Tony Martins said no one else was in the backyard."To me it was a tragic accident - there's no other way to explain it," he said.Koranteng-Barnes doesn't believe anyone intentionally tried to drown Ryan, but he's worried that investigators will simply close his son's case without providing the family any closure."It is their civic duty to tell me how my son got into the pool," Koranteng-Barnes said. "They have to prove it was an accident.":• No foul play suspected in drowning death of Roselle Park 2-year-old • 2-year-old boy drowns in Roselle Park pool
5 Designers You Didn't Know You Already Love
There's a certain style of minimalist interiors enjoying widespread popularity at the moment, particularly when it comes to the chairs we sit on. Unless you're a furniture history enthusiast, today's dining chairs and sofas might appear to epitomise contemporary living - but, in reality, a lot of what you're loving is merely lifted and reproduced from decades gone by.A perusal of New York's Museum of Modern Art's vintage interiors collection - or that of Paris' Pompidou Centre - today is not dissimilar to an afternoon spent browsing the homeware sections of your favourite high street stores. Here, you'll find world-renowned designer names you already adore but never knew.And so, when scouring Pinterest for your favourite styles, it helps to know your Thonet from your Eames or Bauhaus designs. You'll pay a pretty penny for the real deal, that's for sure, but if it's just the look you're after, there are plenty of vintage-inspired alternatives on the market - cultfurniture.com is your best bet online. Here are five designer names to add to your interiors vocabulary.In the 1950s, the American Eames brothers carved out a furniture niche that is now inescapable. "Getting the most of the best to the greatest number of people for the least" was their design philosophy.Most known for their Eames Lounge Chair, their fibreglass rocking chair and their bucket-style dining seats - white with the light wooden legs is the most popular - their creations have come back with a bang in the last five years. This duo became synonymous with mid-century modern furniture design during this era and, today, it's the work of the Eameses that's most often replicated. Vitra Eames Plastic Armchair, €473.10, and chairs, €380.47 each, from nest.co.ukFrom Austria, Thonet is most famous for his No. 14 Café Chair, typically referred to as the 'bistro chair' and one of the best-selling styles of the last 160 years. Introduced in 1859, this minimal bentwood shape with an arc of rounded wood at the back became hot property in the 1920s and '30s. The original chair was made using a unique steam-bending technology that took years to master. Most popular in cafés and restaurants to date, the No. 14 is fast becoming the top choice for dining chairs at home as we collectively shift away from the 'modern' styles that dominated the first decade of the 21st century. You'll also find the Thonet No. 14 chair at a lot of weddings; it's creeping up behind the Italian Chiavari chair in terms of formal- occasion popularity. Thonet style chair, €70.80, cultfurniture.comThe French designer's name you certainly won't be familiar with; the Tolix chair style, you definitely will. It was originally designed by Pauchard in 1934, after discovering that sheet metal could be dipped in molten zinc to prevent rusting but it wasn't until 1956 that the Tolix we see everywhere today was tweaked to perfection.These were conceived as all-weather chairs, perfect for outdoor cafés, and they were particularly popular because you could stack 25 chairs to a height of 2.3 metres. You'll find them in restaurants, bars and hospitals, but today, they're becoming more common in the home. Pauchard-style stool, €49.60, cultfurniture.comBauhaus is not a person but an actual school of design in Germany that remains incredibly influential to this day. Many of the students' creations are described simply as 'Bauhaus', but a whole host of significant designers earned their stripes here. Marcel Breuer was one of particular prominence, designing the recognisable Bauhaus Wasilly Chair. And Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and partner Lilly Reich designed the Barcelona Chair; a piece that, in 1929, would plant the seed for the forthcoming mid-century modern furniture movement. From 1923 to 1933, with founder Walter Gropius at the helm, the Bauhaus school was responsible for some of the most iconic furniture pieces to date. In fact, you can probably thank the school of Bauhaus for today's industrial-looking interiors as they sought to showcase the mechanics behind a piece of furniture, as opposed to hiding it. They've even been credited as the design inspiration behind many of Apple's technological offerings. As relevant today as they were back then, these guys were all about the merging of style and function. Bauhaus became known for chairs and geometric nesting tables that were timeless and futuristic - often composed of wood, leather, metal and glass.Barcelona Chair, €947, popfurniture.comHailing from Denmark, Wegner was one of the most celebrated furniture designers to emerge in the mid-20th century and is considered responsible for the Danish Modern Movement of the 1950s and '60s that's still adored today. His most famous piece is without a doubt the Wishbone Chair, which remains as popular today as when it first took hold in 1949. The chair is still referred to as a triumph of craftsmanship, with its characteristic Y-shaped back. It's an ultra-comfortable dining chair (or breakfast bar stool) with a simple, clean design. Interestingly, though it appears minimal to the eye, there were more than 100 steps involved in the process of the original chair. Designed for Carl Hansen & Son in 1949, it's available today. Carl Hansen Wishbone Chair, currently reduced to €759 at Arnotts, arnotts.ieOther designs to look out for are Noguchi's coffee table, George Nelson's desk, Florence Knoll's sofa and Arne Jacobsen's Egg Chair. Their eye for sleek shapes and interesting detail continues to influence what we have in our homes well into the 21st century.Weekend Magazine
How Is Gravitational Force Is Compared to Flow of Water?
How Is Gravitational Force Is Compared to Flow of Water?
A gravitational field can be thought of as a Potential field. It involves vector calculus, so if you haven't read up on div(ergence), grad(ient) and curl, it's going to sound like gobbledy-gook :) Put as simplistically as I can, imagine the gravitational potential energy of an object at various places above a planet. If you had a function that took a single point in space (say, latitude, longitude, and altitude) and returned the potential energy for it, you'd have something that looked like $f(lat, long, alt) textpotential energy$. $f$ would be called a "potential field".Notice that the potential field returns just a scalar (that is, just a single number and not a vector). Suppose we wanted to know in which direction an object would move if we released it from a given point. In this case, we'd take the "gradient" of the potential field, which would return a vector telling us in which direction, and by how much, an object would accelerate.It turns out that a lot of different forces in nature act like this. Liquids that have no viscosity (that is, really "thin" fluids) can be described using a potential field. So can the electrical fields from point charges, like the classical model of electrons and protons.Because the math is the same for all these different forces, it suggests that they are conceptually the same as well; if we can understand one, we can get a good handle on the others. Imagine something like a bathtub draining water out from the drain. Anything floating on top of the water surface will accelerate towards the drain. Objects further out from the drain will accelerate slower than objects closer to the drain. Just like how gravity works!However, this conceptual model fails on two counts: first, the bathtub water will also start spinning as the it "circles the drain". Objects caught in this "vortex" will start to orbit the drain. You'd think this would match gravity, but it actually doesn't. The spin is caused by friction between water molecules, and it acts to remove energy from the system. Eventually objects caught in the bathtub vortex would get pulled in towards the drain. But in space, there's no friction, and planets orbiting a star don't get slowly pulled in to it. This spinning is called the "curl" of the field. Gravity has no "curl". Neither do electrical fields. Fluids do, which is what gives fluids their tendency to "swirl". Note how objects in a potential field can still orbit, even though the field itself has no curl.Second, this model would suggest an obvious question: if gravity is like a bathtub slowly draining out, what is getting sucked (presumably space itself?) and where is it going? But this is simply a case where our simple model breaks down. Mathematically gravity is just creating a potential field, the gradient of which produces acceleration; there's no need for the potential field to balance out or anything like that. In fact, if nothing is moving, the potential field won't change either, even though it can still accelerate objects caught in it.The above explanation is highly simplistic, but it should help the metaphor make sense without using too many convenient math lies :) Sorry for the length.I listened to a lecture. The professor said that the gravitational field around the particle (spherical in shape) can be compared to a pond having a constant height and depth and water is constantly pumped in the center. The water flows radially outward which is similar to that of the gravitational field around a spherical object.Can anyone explain me how to compare gravitational field and this flow of water?·OTHER ANSWER:I listened to a lecture. The professor said that the gravitational field around the particle (spherical in shape) can be compared to a pond having a constant height and depth and water is constantly pumped in the center. The water flows radially outward which is similar to that of the gravitational field around a spherical object.Can anyone explain me how to compare gravitational field and this flow of water?
The Best Plus Size Fashion Bloggers
The Best Plus Size Fashion Bloggers
Sometimes, when it comes to fashion, we find ourselves in need of inspiration from someone who's a lot like us. Sometimes, plus size ladies feel a little left out when it comes to the latest trends and generally the fashion world. However, this does not have to be the case. Here are some of to follow for some fashion inspiration:Katie of Katie Parot is an Australian plus size blogger who does not shy away from trying out different types of outfits. She's not shy when it comes to wearing different silhouettes and different colors, showing that being a plus size lady should not be a hindrance to dressing up well.Katie (above) styled an A line midi dress with white sneakers, a chic and comfortable combination. Of all the dress silhouettes, A line is one of the most flattering if you happen big hips, or want to hide your tummy. Darker colors like navy or black have a great slimming effect, giving you that beautiful looking figure.Anne of Curls and Contours is another great blogger that is an advocate for wearable and chic clothes for plus size women. She has a more demure style that is so flattering and delightful. She often wears clothes that cover her up but in good sizing that ensures she is not only comfortable but also looks great.Anne (above) wore a printed midi dress with a leather jacket and a pair of white booties. Picking plain sharp-pointed booties is a great option especially if you pick a printed dress. They bring a great balance, especially if you are a plus size lady. Finishing off the look with a black leather jacket gives the look a great edgy touch and makes it more polished.Charmaine of Charmaine Charmant blog is a plus size fashion blogger that oozes class with every single one of her outfits. Her outfits make her look like such a lady whether it's with a dress, skirts, pants, her choice of coats and all. In short, she has great taste and certainly can not seem to fail when it comes to picking out pieces. Her outfits are mostly in neutral colors with a few prints here and there.Charmaine (above) is wearing a pair of high waisted jeans with a satin top and a trench coat. It's a casual chic look which is made even better by her choice of golden slingback shoes. Jeans can also be dressed up.Tricia of Tricia Ann Stoecklin is a plus size fashion blogger that is clearly into earth tones but this is not hard to understand as the colors suit her. The outfit pictures on her platforms will definitely make you want to run into her closet and raid it. Her style is also a combination of young and fun.Tricia (above) layered a brown pullover over a white button-down paired with some plaid pants and some off-white shoes. She demonstrated that layering works so well even for plus size ladies and you do not have to feel extra bulky.Katja of Kurvigeliebe is a plus size blogger who always has fun with the clothes she wears. She likes to take fun pictures of her beautiful outfits. She does not shy away from prints and patterns or bright colors. She is versatile in the cuts she chooses for her clothes as well.Katja (above) is wearing a red dress with some dark tights, a leather jacket and some booties. When you pick a bright dress, it is always advisable to go for everything else black, or at least most things black. Darker jackets are great on the arms too as they have a nice slimming effect.Tayler Wilson is a plus size fashion blogger with a focus on modest clothing. Her page just shows that modest clothing does not have to be boring. She shows that modesty is instead classy when worn right.Tyler (above) wore a navy asymmetrical dress with some green heels and a matching green bag. Wearing darker colors is always a great idea for those days when you want to look classy whether as a plus size or slimmer lady. However, sometimes dark colors could look cold so adding a pop of color like Tyler did gives the outfit life.Claire of Sorry I am Awkward Sorry is a plus size blogger that is clearly in love with curvy fashion, handmade jewelry and travel to top everything off. Her wardrobe consists of classic pieces and she pairs them with some more modern pieces. Her style is easily desirable and you will definitely get some inspiration from her even if you are not a plus size girl.Claire (above) is wearing a classic combination of a white button-down with jeans and some open shoes. This is a combination that never goes old on any given day. It's both classic and classy.When you look at La Loca del Ropero blog, you will love just how great the blogger behind it looks in her simple outfits. Sometimes, less is just more even in fashion and you do not really need to go so over-the-top with your clothes.In the picture (above) she's wearing a classic combination of black and white. A black pair of stylish pants and a white button-down then went for a pop of color with her shoes. It's always great to accessorize with such a pairing because it's very simple. So a hat and scarf works.Susa of Miss Suzie Loves is another plus size blogger you should follow. She has such relatable style. When you go through her posts you can not help but realize she has a nice way of pairing pieces that you probably already have in your closet, just, she makes them look great.Susa (above) wore a pair of brown pants with a lace top and a duster. Neutral shades work great on any given day as they are always fashionable. These shades are also great for plus size women.Sabrina of Sabrina Styled is a plus size blogger with sort of an island way of dressing. In other words, looking at her clothes just brings you joy as they are mostly bright and also highly printed. She does not shy away from florals or tropical prints.Sabrina (above) wore a printed shirt dress with a pair of boots. Whether you are tall, short, slim or plus size, a shirt dress always makes you look great and smart. They can be dressed up and dressed down too. As such, every plus size woman should own at least one.Tanya of Tanya Gouraige is yet another very stylish plus size blogger whose style is nice and fun. She looks great in denim, booties and more fun pieces. She has a rather youthful style consisting of fun dresses, fun graphics t-shirts and so much more that you will like if you are into a fun outfit.Tanya (above) is wearing a printed, asymmetrical skater dress with a pair of sneakers. It's a fun dress with a unique print that is still subtle. It's fit for a plus size woman as it shows the curves just right without exaggerating. It does not overwhelm you.Amee of Ameeloux is a plus size blogger with very modern style. Most of her pictures have very updated trends and her style is also very youthful. She showcases a great balance between different looks and they truly suit her so you can definitely count on her for some plus size fashion inspiration.Amee (above) is wearing an off-shoulder dress with a pair of white sneakers and a white matching bag. Picking trends such as off-shoulder is a nice way to go about summer dressing for plus size girls as the showing shoulder looks so feminine.Diana of Plusmodel Diana has a more demure style, often showing plus size women how they can dress up even while being covered up but still look amazing. She's more into dresses and longer ones at that.Diana (above) is wearing a maxi dress with simple shoes and a simple bag. She belted the dress to cinch her waist. For plus sized women it's always great to use a good belt as it makes your waist look slimmer, gives the dress a better shape and you will feel even more confident to walk out in your outfit.Kasia of Fajnainiechuda blog is a lady who seemingly has all the clothes we want and need. She always looks so put together. Her style is so appropriate by all standards. Whether you like to be all covered up or like to leave just a bit of skin showing.Kasia (above) is wearing a black polka dot dress with some white booties. She added a pop of color with a red beret, making her look more Parisian chic. Her dress is in a fit-n-flair style that's ever so versatile and forgiving as it gives the perfect figure.Nanae is a plus size blogger with a love for midis if her images are anything to go by. From skirts to dresses and prefers to pick out girlie pieces. She often goes for florals, and other prints. She also prefers A-line silhouettes which are very feminine.Nanae (above) styled a printed midi skirt with a black top and some matching black shoes. Plus size ladies also look great with midi skirts, the key though is to wear the skirt with a well fitted top to balance out the look.Meg of Mind the Curves Za is a mother with a love for fashion. Being a mother, she has a thing for functional style to go along with her lifestyle. From her platform, you can get inspiration not only for plus size but also maternity outfits. Her plus size style is also very versatile as she often wears pieces that work for different environments too.Meg (above) is wearing an asymmetrical midi dress black in color with some white sneakers. It's a great trendy look that is also very sporty or casual chic.Anna of Anna Lariccia is very open-minded when it comes to her plus size fashion. She's always switching up her looks from shorts to ripped jeans, dresses to skirts. Her platform shows that just because you are a plus size woman does not mean you have to be limited in your choice of clothing.Anna (above) styled a simple satin top with a pair of skinny jeans and some booties. When in doubt, regardless of whether you are a plus size girl or mid size or even slimmer skinny jeans work.Sandra of Lapecosapreciosa is into more chic looks. She often picks outfits that are on the classier side whether for a casual look or a dressier one. She's the plus size blogger to follow if you are looking to upgrade your style.Sandra (above) styled a pinstriped dress and layered a brown shirt over it. She went for a matching pair of shoes and a straw bag. It's a simple yet classy outfit with colors that work perfectly for a plus size woman.Shalonda of Simplly Shalonda's style can be described as very fashion forward, so grown and classy as well. She is a plus size stylish lady that does not shy away from bright colors and bold prints. You can also learn so much from her when it comes to accessorizing as she does such a great job there.Shalonda (above) is wearing a nude colored dress with a pair of matching nude heels. It's a minimalist pairing that looks great on just about every plus size woman.Jasmine of Official Jazzy's plus size style is more on the bold side. She definitely is proud of her body even incorporating pieces like crop tops and prints such as leopard prints but she does have her demure moments.Jasmine (above) styled a black dress with some neon shoes to give her look that much-needed pop of color. A black dress is a must have for everyone regardless of their body size. You never go wrong with one. Besides, even the simplest one can make you stand out.So, in case you were looking for some plus size fashion inspiration, you can find it in these 20 bloggers.I'm looking for stores or sites that have clothing for trendy plus size women. Suggestions?Torrid has a lot of cute and trendy plus size clothing
Help She Wont Sleep in Her Bassinet?
Help She Wont Sleep in Her Bassinet?
She's only a week old - and she's still adjusting to her new life, too! She definitely won't be self-soothing at this point, and you certainly won't "spoil" her by holding her.Try swaddling her so she feels secure. Try some anti-gas medicine. Try letting her sleep in a more upright position, like in her car seat; she may have a medical condition that makes it uncomfortable to lay flat - or she just might not like to lay flat. Play soft music or white noise in the background to help her sleep better. Get some suggestions from your doctor.You have some long weeks ahead of you, Mama, but that's what parenting is about. Make sure you and Daddy take shifts to help each other get through it.• Suggested Readingmoving out on my own for the first time? im scared please send advice?You will be OK, I promise!Look at the bright side - you are ONLY 20 minutes away from your family. At the same time, you are on your own! You are embarking on a new adventure!Talk to the management about your questions. Yes, stack-able washer/dryer units are still available. I know what you mean about grocery shopping because I live on the 2nd floor. I try to go to the store every couple of days so that I don't have more bags than I can carry in one trip.The 2nd floor is great because no one lives above me! (no "elephants" walking overhead). The downside is that I can't practice line dancing or do any aerobics to dvd's because I don't want to be the "elephant" to my downstairs neighbors. lol------Toddler climbing INTO, not out of, crib?Sadly there is not much you can do about climbing in general but there is something you can buy at walmart.com called a crib tent. I bought one for my son when he was newborn to keep the cats out of the crib and to keep him in. It attaches to the top of the crib in a tent like fashion and zips and unzips. It will keep her out and will discourage her climbing it. It will also keep your younger one safe from falling out later. As for the climbing of other furniture you could try time outs when you catch her or distracting her from what she is doing by getting her interested in another activity but if she is a monkey like my son it will be hard. Good luck. You are not alone.------Putting a mattress in a play yard?I thought the same thing when I got a pack and play with changing table for the my newborn to stay at Grandma's house. I found out from several people that they are supposed to sleep on firm surfaces. You will see if you set them on anything too soft how easy they roll. I would be careful about adding a mattress bc the bassinet feature has a weight limit. You need to make sure that the weight of it and the weight of your son aren't over the limit.What I did for my daughter was wrap the mattress pad in one of the many fluffy blankets I got as a gift and then wrapped that tightly with a receiving blanket. If you do this be sure all the ends of the blankets are tucked under and you have a taut surface. It will feel more cushy and will still be safe for baby.------MIL wants us to use her son's old baby bed 22 yrs old.?Do some research on the safety of the baby bed. If it has slats like a crib, check that the slats are close enough together that the baby's head can't fit through it. If it's not safe, you may be able to find a handyman or carpenter to adapt it. Could even make it into something else -- like use the head and foot of it to make the ends of a nice new heirloom toybox / trunk.If you do find that it's safe, and you like the idea of the tradition, embrace it! It will please her, and be a nice tradition for your baby.If you hate the idea, just let her down gently... I'm so flattered by your generous offer, but I really had my heart set on this other bed... Why don't we set it up at your house so we can use it when we visit?------Fleas in basement? Can't vacuum and newborn in the house?Best, absolutely best bug control...diatomaceous earth. It is a naturally occurring substance, not man made or a reactive chemical. In minor amounts it is harmless (for liability reasons pretend you didn't read that) except to bugs. It is microscopically sharp crystals that will cut the outer shell of bugs and then they die. As far as I can tell, it kills all bugs. You can sprinkle DE with a salt shaker all around your basement, behind your furniture, on your dog (not in eyes please), on your carpets and rugs, in kitchen and linen cabinets, pretty much anywhere (I wouldn't put it in the baby's bed, but I wouldn't mind it between my mattress & box springs or in pillow cases & under sheets). It lasts as an effective bug killer until you remove it, and is very cheap at any hardware or pool supply. Only downside, it is visible on dark surfaces------My parents are adopting a 2 yr old girl?Hey!Congrats to you and your family! This is a great choice for ANY family, adoption is a wonderful thing and I'm sure you will all be a great family to the child.Your check list of things looks pretty good. Make sure that some of the toys have an educational purpose, however--and since you didn't give your age, I'll have to guess that you're a teenager. Little sisters can be veryyy annoying sometimes, but don't take any anger out on her. Be the big sister that SHE wants to be...don't party a lot, don't disobey parents, do well in school. Lead by example! Talk and play with your younger sister a lot, because it helps develop emotional and social skills. :)When it comes time to enroll her in school, be part of her education! She'll like that, a lot. Help your parents out with what they need. :)Good luck!-Lish------How can I incorporate antique furniture in a little girls room?It must be a large room I hope and is it going to be shared by both as your little girl will grow and need more space than at this present time in life.Just because the fashion mags have all white at this present time. Colour scheme change from season to season with them as next year it will be pink or blue.Nothing wrong with going all out in antique look. Like match the whole room in say Edwardian or Gothic look what ever as children's rooms can be adapted that way. I nice old fashion rocking horse and dolls house wouldn't go astray. Nice sturdy children table and chairs with a Queen Ann bed and dresser to match bringing out the beautiful wood grain would look nice.Anyway have a Happy New Year.------How can I introduce my new baby to my two dogs?After you've had your baby and dressed him/her give your husband/partner the baby's gro/hat/mits/blanket etc to take home before hand to let the dogs have a good sniff therefore they will be used to the smell when you bring baby home.When your home introduce them separately and work form there only you know your own dogs i would invest in a dog gate between rooms to so you can lock them out the room but they can still see.I would also suggest not letting them sleep/sit on the furniture its not nice the baby will get full of dogs hairs euch !!Don't be offended either but Please never leave your baby alone whether in the crib/pram any were alone with the dog(s) no matter how much they grow to love him/her.------Should I get my teacup Chihuahua spayed?It is much safer to get her spayed. Toy dogs have frequent problem pregnancies and if she were to get pregnant it could kill her. There are also potential diseases that occur in unspayed dogs. Going into heat every few months is messy and gets blood on your carpet. She will be frustrated and tend to mark territory, that means pee around the apartment.1 less risky than pregnancy or diseases2 male dogs are incredibly sneaky and single minded. A friend brings their dog over... Plus being inside is unhealthy. She needs walks as much as any other dog. Otherwise she will be overweight and have joint problems.3 Ask if you can leave her at the Vet's overnight and an extra dayLast there is no such thing as a teacup Chihuahua. Chihuahuas are, according to the breed standard, 2 - 6 pounds. If your dog is already 2 pounds and not yet fully grown, she will be larger than the breed standard, not smaller.------Im 18 live in an apartment with my boyfriend and 6 month old baby.He keeps throwing my furniture out telling .?Why don't you try getting in touch with your family in other states and see if you are able to move in with them? Or ask a friend if you can stay with them just until you get things settled. As for your boyfriend you deserve better no matter how much you may love him don't put you and your baby through that. Call your local police station and get a restraining order on him. He will more than likely get arrested depending on your states policy on domestic issues. Arizona is extremely strict and some one gets arrested on the spot. The police station can also help you find a shelter if its needed. do you and your son a favor and leave while you can it may be hard but in the long run it will be worth it best of luck girly------How to get rid of Roaches??Exterminator! If it the big ones; you don't have a problem yet! If it's the small ones that you see, that means there are more babies running around; that's a problem. The exterminator is your best bet!! My dad's house is surrounded by huge trees; which means the big tree ones. He keeps his house exterminated; and it's not a problem. If you want to go cheaper...get the 'house bombs'! You can get them at Wal-Mart; you set them off in your house and it's get in the nooks-n-crannies! Take your family to the park for the day and bomb the house. Come back, mop, dust, clean as usual! Check the label there is a certain amount of time you need to stay out of the house while it gets bombed! Good Luck!!!------How do i get my dog to not chew thingd?http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/chewing.htmHi Joe the above link might be of some help however all pups chew because they are bored or are in pain with their teeth coming through. Your parents need to understand this because they would'nt get rid of a teething baby would they? You sound vey worried so make sure you pup has a safe bone to chew on and keep him away from a room that has lots of furniture with wooden legs. My GSD is 9 months old and so far all he has destroyed is a duvet that I bought for him, he has a nice bone and I tire him out with walks and such he also has an indestructible ball. Your Vet can give you a pain killer and once the pup's teeth are through he will stop chewing everything in sight. Pick up clothes and shoes Joe so you are helping the dog.The best of luck to you both.
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