The Medical Center Foundation Announces More Than 2.3 Million Raised Through W.a.T.C.H. Employee-Giv

The employees of Northeast Georgia Health System (NGHS) are going beyond the bedside and into their wallets to show their commitment to improving the health of the community in all they do.Nancy Colston, president and chief development officer of The Medical Center Foundation, announced that NGHS employees raised $2,388,048 through a recent campaign conducted by its employee-giving club, called W.A.T.C.H. (We Are Targeting Community Healthcare)."By pledging more than $2.3 million, NGHS employees have set a new record and made an inspiring leap into our campaign," said Colston.

"This is a tremendous milestone in the history of The Medical Center Foundation and one that has a direct impact on the health care of our community."Employee fundraising efforts were led by tri-chairs: Heath Gurr, RPh; Ivan Moore, RN; and Jennifer Stoeckig, RN; who were supported by a team of nearly 40 employee volunteers throughout the Health System. Pledges were made by more than 3,400 employees during 100 presentations held across the organization this summer.

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members have given more than $7.

8 million since the first W.

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Campaign began in 1999 to support numerous projects such as Hospice of Northeast Georgia Medical Center, community walks, nursing and allied health scholarships, a mobile simulation unit and a future wellness walkway to be constructed at Northeast Georgia Medical Center Braselton.Learn more about W.A.T.C.H. and how you can support The Medical Center Foundation at www.TheMedicalCenterFoundation.org.In This Picture: The total dollar amount raised through a recent campaign conducted by The Medical Center Foundation's employee-giving club, called W.

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, is revealed to W.

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Committee members.

Originally published at Gwinnett Magazine

·RELATED QUESTION

Is there is any side effects of not sleeping in a medicated bed?

I don't think so! if you are not a medical patient, you can sleep in any bed you feel comfortable with.

But for medical patients, it is necessary to sleep on a medicated because it has so many movable parts that offer comfort to them and for their treatment.

If you want a high-quality medical bed at your resident, you can easily get a free demonstration on the same day you will contact one of the best reliable online platforms which is Adjustable beds

.

They will provide you what ever you need in your medical bed. If you want to take a full experience of their medical beds, then you can use their free no obligation home service that will allow you to use their products at your own home.

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Ethicists, Hold Your Horses
By Fleur Jongepier (Assistant Professor of (Digital) Ethics at Radboud University Nijmegen) and Karin Jongsma (Assistant Professor of Bioethics at University Medical Center Utrecht). This article is loosely based on a Dutch article which previously appeared on the philosophy weblog Bij Nader Inzien. Translation by Radboud Recharge and the authors. The English version of this article was published on Open for Debate.If intensive care beds or ventilators run out, who should be saved? And how should such decisions be morally justified? These are horrible, indeed impossible, decisions that clinicians currently face, or may be confronted with in the (near) future. In Italy, clinicians were "weeping in the hospital hallways because of the choices they were going to have to make". These are also questions that ethicists have, for decades, thought long and hard about.It seems natural - so natural it almost goes without saying - for ethicists to engage right now, and to start a public debate about the moral justifications of the possible triage options. And they have. Julian Savulescu and Dominic Wilkinson, for instance, recently wrote an article entitled 'Who gets the ventilator in the coronavirus pandemic?' They outline five different approaches, but really only take the utilitarian approach seriously; in other words, that a clinician should act such as to save the greatest number. On the utilitarian view, if "one person, Jim, has a 90 per cent chance and another, Jock, has a 10 per cent chance, you should use your ventilator for Jim." We can call them Jim and Jock of course, but let's not forget that Jim typically represents the elderly or people with illnesses or disabilities, whereas Jock represent the young and fit.Similarly, in the Dutch context, colleagues Marcel Verweij and Roland Pierik recently stirred up debate on the opinion pages of the national newspaper. They proposed that in the event of extreme scarcity in the intensive care unit, priority should be given to younger corona patients. Verweij and Pierik are by no means the only ones defending this view. What's the reasoning behind this view?There are basically two arguments. First, young people generally recover faster, which means that giving priority to younger people will allow one to treat more people overall, thereby increasing the chance to save more lives. Verweij and Pierik provide a second, much more controversial, argument, namely, that the death of a young person involves a "much greater loss". Why? Because an 80-year-old will have already "had the chance to live their life".This is not an unfamiliar standpoint within ethics - it's known as the "fair innings principle" - but this doesn't mean it's uncontroversial. Here we are not principally concerned with the fair innings principle itself (though we have serious concerns on that front, too), but more fundamentally about whether now is the right time to have a public debate about whether it's morally justifiable to sacrifice the elderly to save more lives whilst the pandemic is raging on.An impossible burdenIn response to alarmed reactions by some readers, Verweij and Pierik wrote a second article, motivating their reason for submitting their article to the national newspaper. They give two reasons: solidarity and democratic, public deliberation. We believe both arguments are insufficient reasons, in fact we think on the grounds of solidarity and democracy one can come to the opposite conclusion, that we shouldn't have a public debate about the ethical foundations of triage decisions right now.Let's start with the argument from solidarity. We should have a public debate about the ethics of triage decisions because doing so is a way of expressing solidarity with clinicians. Verweij and Pierik write: "It's an almost unbearable responsibility to have to decide who should and should not be offered a chance of survival. Solidarity means that we should collectively bear the burden of the crisis as much as possible."Some have recently suggested to introduce a "triage committee" to remove "the weight of these choices from any one individual, spreading the burden among all members of the committee". Such a committee would also enable physicians and nurses to remain the primary caretaker and "fiduciary advocates" rather than simultaneously being the one having to decide whether their lives are to be saved at all, imposing on them an impossible double-role.A need for moral reassurance?But can ethicists - indeed, ethical theory - also help relieve the burden? In a sense, it feels right to stand firmly behind the clinicians, who are now making impossible decisions, and to tell them: You're doing okay, your choices are ethically justifiable.But it is not evident that clinicians are now actually helped by moral reassurances or for ethicists to 'have their back'. It is also not necessarily a good idea to pull clinicians into a reflective, deliberative ethical mode right now. This could slow them down or result in confusion and might actually increase rather than reduce the burden on them. Clinicians already have had their training and learned the moral theory; now is the time to act.A potential explanation for why ethicists are submitting op eds to the newspapers about triage decisions is that academic questions have become real life questions, plus academics are being told from every angle they need to get out of their ivory towers. As Verweij and Pierik write: "For us as ethicists, the question whose lives should be saved is obviously an interesting dilemma that we often discuss in our teaching and articles."Indeed, examples of triage decisions are widely used in education as thought experiments. But real-life triage is a different matter altogether. We firmly believe triage decisions are in safe hands with clinical (support) teams, and, in fact, not broaching the issue of moral justifications of triage decisions could now actually express more solidarity and support with clinicians than defending a specific moral stance. A more practical point is that clinicians in all likelihood will neither have the time nor the energy to read the opinion pages. It is therefore questionable whether one could reach them with articles in the newspaper, even if one would want to.You might say: in spite of the fact that clinicians indeed have had 'the theory' and in spite of the fact that we place great trust their decision-making capacities, actually having to make such decisions is another story. And this must indeed be acknowledged. The burden on clinicians is inconceivably heavy.Given the current burden on clinicians, many clinicians would perhaps welcome, or even explicitly request, guidance from ethicists. So here we want to make clear that this is not what we are against. Ethicists can and do contribute to ongoing triage conversations with physicians, respiratory therapists, nurses, and critical care specialists. To an important extent, then, a public debate which includes ethicists is already ongoing. What's less clear is just how 'public' a 'public debate' must be (more on this below). In any case, ethicists can help out - and express solidarity with - clinicians in other ways - more fruitful ways, we think - than defending utilitarianism or the fair innings principle in the media.Solidarity: a double-edged swordAs we've seen, one argument to have this public debate now is that this would express solidarity with clinicians. We've suggested that it is not evident that this would actually benefit them. Even if it did, though, an appeal to solidarity cuts both ways. After all, many members of the public were startled and hurt by the articles currently going around. That this has created unrest and real damage to some individuals was foreseeable. It was foreseeable that the message that the lives of some people would be considered less worthy than others' would linger primarily in the minds of the elderly, the already ill or people with disabilities.Obviously, the idea that some lives are more worthy than others is not the explicit or intended message of the articles which defend utilitarian or fair innings-based ways of making triage decisions. In the philosophy of language, however, a useful distinction is made between 'saying' and 'conveying'. You can say something explicitly, but you can also implicitly convey a message, be it intentionally or not. It is understandable that some elderly, ill, or vulnerable readers interpreted utilitarian and fair innings-based articles in ways that had not been explicitly said. For instance, it's understandable that many got the message that their lives were of lesser worth or that the elderly 'have already had their chance'. These messages were, no doubt, not meant to be conveyed. But that they were conveyed all the same was foreseeable.Here's the thing: an ethicist should not only reflect on moral rules, norms, and principles, and how they (fail to) apply to the real world, but also on what communicating certain moral views can bring about in the lives and experiences of human beings. How and when to communicate and reflect on ethical principles is an important part of ethics itself.Tragedy and the limits of ethicsAnother possible unintentional message of the article was that the aforementioned priority principle that Verweij and Pierik defended could be interpreted as a bona fide or 'sound' ethical principle. It is crucial to emphasise that triages in intensive care in crisis situations are examples of tragedy. Tragedies pose a challenge to almost all moral theories and principles (see also this piece written by Schaubroeck on the BNI website (in Dutch) and this blog from John Danaher).We generally consider moral theories, beliefs, and principles (such as justice, human dignity, non-discrimination, and so on) to be 'admirable' or the sorts of things we would proudly or wholeheartedly support. But this works differently in tragic situations. When a younger person is given priority and an older person dies as a result, we would not say that the underlying decision and principle was 'admirable'. We would not proudly stand by the ethical justification for such a decision. The choice involves choosing the lesser of two unspeakable evils; it was a tragic decision.Authors writing on triage decisions are well aware of this, of course. But the very act of defending, say, utilitarianism or the fair innings principle in public in times of crisis, and arguing what makes the approach justified, may have nevertheless convey a different message to some readers. It may convey that it is morally 'okay' to sacrifice the old or vulnerable in order to save the young. It's not.Given the likelihood that articles in which ethicists say how triage decisions ought to be made on the basis of moral theories and principles fails to reach or genuinely help its target audience (clinicians) and that another important audience (members of the general public) are likely to be harmed by its content, it's better if ethicists would not publish their takes on triage at this moment. Precisely for reasons of solidarity.A democratic discussionOne might rightly worry: isn't what we are proposing here anti-democratic? Shouldn't it be precisely part of a well-functioning democracy to discuss vital decisions, such as priority rules on intensive care units? Given the value of democracy and its connection to open debate, it seems discussing these matters with the general public is precisely what must be done. Even if people are startled, even harmed, as a result.We agree that having societal debates is vital. We even agree that we need to have an open conversation about the possible moral justifications of triage decisions. However, the 'argument from democracy', as we might call it, is not an argument for having that conversation now.Our worry about trying to aim for a 'public debate' where triage decisions are concerned, is that it will be neither a 'debate' nor strictly speaking 'societal'. After all, only about 50% of the (Dutch) population reads the newspaper. In those percentages, men are generally overrepresented and migrants are underrepresented. So, the public reached through (online) articles may well be ill-representing society at large. As for having a 'debate': an (online) article does not constitute a debate (not the sort of debate we need to have, anyway). It's one directional. This is particularly problematic when ethicists make it seem as if the theory or principle they defend (utilitarianism or the fair innings principle, say) is the moral principle.It doesn't need to be one-directional, and no doubt the ethicists who are engaging precisely hope and aim for readers to engage, too. And sure, readers could submit a two hundred-word reply, or say something in the comment section. But that's not nearly enough. Also, let's not forget these are likely to be individuals with time and energy on their hands, that is, probably not the ones ill or stressed out. That is: those affected most. If we want a genuinely public debate, we need to give the public a genuine voice. We need more than a handful of articles by ethicists to which citizens can respond in the comment sections. Having a proper public conversation is vital, but doing so now is, we fear, neither desirable nor possible.Against democracy?A recent statement from the Nuffield Council on Bioethics deals explicitly with questions concerning democratic governance in relation to COVID-19. The authors express serious concerns about the situation in the UK - and situations elsewhere are probably not dissimilar - that, right now, decisions are being made that "go to the very heart of what governments are there to do: to protect the freedom and well-being of their people". Yet public information is "limited and obscure" and no proper public discourse on any of the vital ethical-political questions has gotten off the ground. They plead for greater accountability and transparency, and ask the government to get public deliberation off the ground. We are "all in it together, we all need to know and all need to have a voice".The present article might be interpreted as being "against" initiatives like these. So we want to be clear: we very much share the overall pro-transparency and pro-democratic sentiment. But respecting and promoting transparency and democracy can be done in different ways. There's a difference, to begin, between accountability and transparency (we all need to know) on the one hand and public discourse (we all need to have voice), on the other. We wholeheartedly agree with the first point. It's crucial that governments make explicit the decisions they are making and make explicit their reasons (and empirical evidence, where available) for making those decisions.As for the second point: yes, we do "all need to have a voice". The question is: do we all have a voice? Are our voices at the same decibels? Do we all have a voice that will actually be heard? If we don't, then it may not be the best idea to engage in public discourse now but rather do so later, once we've had more time to also think about and are actually able to guarantee the diversity and inclusivity of the debate we need to have. Public debates are difficult, slow, and complex and it is unlikely that a consensus or otherwise strong supported triage criterion will be the result from public consultation any time soon.The alternative is a quasi-public debate, in which some members of the public are represented, and others (those most affected, we fear) aren't. This is perhaps the worse of the two options. The combination of "public debate" and "now" form an unhappy couple. Doing it properly later may be better than doing it poorly and half-heartedly now. If only because three or four op-eds and a half-baked survey filled in by healthy, abled, and childless individuals might create the illusion that we've all had a say when in fact we haven't at all.Being realistic or a coward?Our standpoint relates to an important distinction in political philosophy between ideal theory and non-ideal theory. Ideally, we agree: we need to have a public debate, we need to have it now, and we need to have it with all of us. But sometimes, pursuing the ideal can have counterproductive outcomes, and pursuing a non-ideal course of action (having the debate later), is to be preferred. Precisely because, paradoxically, the non-ideal course of action enables us to get closer to the ideal of all of us having a voice, and getting an actual chance of being heard.Maybe we're too pessimistic. When defending non-ideal solutions, one always risks slipping into cowardice. As the authors of the Nuffic statement acknowledge, maybe there is "no capacity now to open up a wider public discourse", which is what we fear, but they also add, quite rightly, that "capacity should not be an excuse". The solution must clearly then be not to accept the situation but to try and change the capacity. But can we? The real question is whether we can really get a public debate going that is legitimate and isn't going to harm more than it helps. We need to think about the empirical chances of public deliberation actually being successful. Because if the public is not ready, or able, or willing to engage in public deliberation, or if it turns out only a privileged subset of the public is, then that might be a reason not to do it now, in spite of the fact that, ideally, we should all be deliberating about this together, right now.Non-ideal circumstancesAnother obvious reason for not starting a societal debate now is that emotions are running high, there is a great deal of unrest, fear, misunderstanding and uncertainty. As far as we can see, there is now a need for articles about which specific action we should be taking in daily life (What are we supposed to do exactly when someone in our household becomes sick? Should we be making DIY masks or not?).Let's also not forget many members of the general public are currently being invaded by tent-building, pet-hunting offspring with Nutella-smeared faces. They may well have other things on their minds than the moral justification of implicit ethical principles for triage at the intensive care unit. They might well want to engage in public deliberation, but simply can't, at this moment. These are not ideal circumstances for a complex societal debate about the principles of who should be saved in these extraordinary times. We believe a public discussion would be more effective, less aggressive, and more inclusive, if we have it when the worst of this is over. We contend therefore that, precisely for reasons of democratic legitimacy, now is not the time.For the record: despite the title of this blog, there is plenty of constructive work that ethicists could do. For example, they could say something sensible about the currently emerging culture of 'shaming' and hostility; the difference between being alone and being lonely; how can we ensure ethically sound clinical research in times of crisis; how we should feel about the enormous influence of companies who sell ventilators and choose whom (not) to sell it to; how we should be dealing with digital social contact (and medical consultations) and how this differs or does not differ from face-to-face meetings. We are here specifically worried about whether ethicists can fulfil a constructive role when it comes to publicly defending certain moral theories or principles to justify ways of making triage decisions on intensive care units, or whether it's better to place our trust in clinicians and/or triage committees.The ethicist's role in times of crisisBut isn't this an ethicist's job? Isn't it their responsibility to publicly discuss uncomfortable moral principles and considerations, also in crisis situations? We realise that our standpoint is quite controversial, but we would say: no, not necessarily.Indeed, it is the ethicist's job to reflect on the ethical challenges and issues in society. Where possible, it is also their job to share their expertise with doctors when they undergo crisis training and learn about triage decision-making. At the moment, this is already going on. It's not like ethicists are not consulted or asked for their views - the contrary. But it's not enough for an ethicist to share their knowledge of how certain moral theories or principles are understood in ongoing debates in applied ethics. In their expert capacity, their responsibility also extends to taking into account what the articulation and defence of certain moral principles may lead to. This includes unintended messages. Especially utilitarians, who appear to have the loudest voice in current triage discussions, have every reason to include this factor in their calculations.Isn't it strange that we are engaging in public debate in order to say we shouldn't be having this public debate? Yes, it's strange, but these are strange times. For this reason, we ultimately decided that we would not send a (much) shorter version of this article to the newspaper, since that would be hypocritical. We decided it may be right to engage on a more reflective platform, without scarcity, and that allows for longreads. Though the irony of it all does not escape us.We believe that now that there are actually real ethical dilemmas, this is, paradoxically perhaps, the time for ethicists to hold their horses. We should now be relying on the expertise - and by this we specifically also mean the moral expertise - of clinicians and their support teams, who face incredibly difficult decisions at the intensive care unit. We believe that this trust is more supportive towards clinicians than a reflectively substantiated ethical article that, no matter which way you look at it, raises questions about the decisions clinicians have to make. Applied ethicists are, ideally, good at ethically reflecting on 'real life' situations. Clinicians are good at acting in 'real life' situations.To put it simply: fellow ethicists, now is not the time.·RELATED QUESTIONIs there is any side effects of not sleeping in a medicated bed?I don't think so! if you are not a medical patient, you can sleep in any bed you feel comfortable with.But for medical patients, it is necessary to sleep on a medicated because it has so many movable parts that offer comfort to them and for their treatment.If you want a high-quality medical bed at your resident, you can easily get a free demonstration on the same day you will contact one of the best reliable online platforms which is Adjustable beds.They will provide you what ever you need in your medical bed. If you want to take a full experience of their medical beds, then you can use their free no obligation home service that will allow you to use their products at your own home.
Buy Hospital Beds in New Jersey and Philadelphia Area
Hospital beds are of different types and different beds have different kinds of usage. Each has a specific purpose and not every hospital has all the types. The choice depends on various factors and also on the prices of different beds. Let's have a look at some of the most common types of hospital beds:Gatch BedProbably the oldest hospital beds that one can see even today. Gatch beds are usually found in nursing homes and medical facilities that are not economically well-off. They do not run electricity and have three cranks present at the foot just below the mattress. One crank lowers and raises the whole bed, one the head of the bed and the final one lowers and raises the foot of the bed.Electric BedAn electric hospital bed is what can be seen most commonly. The side rails have buttons that need to be pressed in case the head needs to be raised or lowered. The patients can do these themselves ensuring more comfort and convenience.StretchersThese are the beds that are generally present in the hospital emergency rooms. These offer ultimate mobility and can be easily transferred from 'place of accident' or house to the ambulance and to the emergency room. These come with folding legs.Low BedsThese, as the name suggests, have a low height and used for patients who have a tendency to fall off from the bed and sustain injury, in spite of the side rails. The height can be adjusted in some of these and is usually in the range of 8 inches to 2 feet from the ground. However, in most cases, only the head and foot can be raised and lowered.Low Air Loss BedThese come with special cushions and are for burn and skin-graft patients. The bed come with special hospital bed mattress having sacs where air can be blow into. This bed is meant to keep the patient cool and dry. Often patients with serious ulcer problems are given such beds.Circo-electric BedThese look like a hamster treadmill and can rotate. These are used for patients with severe spinal injury or skin conditions that needs to be turned frequently and cannot move.To buy hospital bed in New Jersey and Philadelphia, Goodwill Home Medical Equipment is a reliable name. They even supply a wide range of medical supplies, incontinence products, mobility aids and home medical equipment. Please visit or call 609-337-5506 for more information.Buy hospital bed in New Jersey and Philadelphia, Electric Hospital Bed, Patient Hoyer Lift for Sale, Hospital Bed Mattress·RELATED QUESTIONIs there is any side effects of not sleeping in a medicated bed?I don't think so! if you are not a medical patient, you can sleep in any bed you feel comfortable with.But for medical patients, it is necessary to sleep on a medicated because it has so many movable parts that offer comfort to them and for their treatment.If you want a high-quality medical bed at your resident, you can easily get a free demonstration on the same day you will contact one of the best reliable online platforms which is Adjustable beds.They will provide you what ever you need in your medical bed. If you want to take a full experience of their medical beds, then you can use their free no obligation home service that will allow you to use their products at your own home.
Beds That Heal You
Beds are meant for sleep. Sleep is essential for healthy living. Healthy living is only possible if you keep healing the wear and tears life causes. That's a fact!Hospitals and their capacity to attend patients have a direct proportional relationship with the number of beds they accommodate. In the words of Groucho Marx- A hospital bed is a parked taxi, with the meter running!A hospital bed by name is meant for a patient. The bed ensures comfort and well being. Not only for the patients, but the hospital bed is also designed for the health care staff, so that they can perform their duties properly. Some common features are· Portability of the bed.· Adjustable height of the bed.· Side railings on the bed for safety of the patients.· Buttons to operate the bed.UsageBy name it is not only suited for the hospitals but also can be kept at other locations where an ailing has to be taken care of. These can be listed as nursing homes, domestic health care, old age home etc.The varietiesGone are the days when a hospital bed was manually operated by a pulley that was moved clock wise or anti clock wise in order to adjust the bed height. Now we have fully and semi-automated beds that operate with push buttons or remote controls.Now the beds are further fragmented to operate on particular areas like the head the foot or the body. Manufacturers of hospital beds have flooded the market with variety that suits the purpose.Some featuresWheels- Beds are attached with wheels so that they are movable. These wheels are blocked for safety reasons when not in use.Elevation-The beds are elevated for the ease of the patients. Beds can be raised in the head section or the foot section or the entire body section depending on the need of the hour.Safety features-Despite the side railing these days the beds are fitted with exit alarms that raise an alarm the moment the bed gets empty. These alarms are meant for the older people who have a falling off tendency and people with memory impairment.·RELATED QUESTIONIs there is any side effects of not sleeping in a medicated bed?I don't think so! if you are not a medical patient, you can sleep in any bed you feel comfortable with.But for medical patients, it is necessary to sleep on a medicated because it has so many movable parts that offer comfort to them and for their treatment.If you want a high-quality medical bed at your resident, you can easily get a free demonstration on the same day you will contact one of the best reliable online platforms which is Adjustable beds.They will provide you what ever you need in your medical bed. If you want to take a full experience of their medical beds, then you can use their free no obligation home service that will allow you to use their products at your own home.
The Damaging Tunnel of Residency
I woke up today, feeling miserable and empty. Yesterday too. And the day before yesterday. It was all the same.And what worries me the most is that this wave of bitterness hits me every single day since my second semester of residential program. I've become easily irritated by the smallest things. The number of snide remarks I throw is concerning, my patience grows thinner by each day passing. I'm constantly on edge and frustrated. All in all, I've become the passive-aggressive personality I always despise.It's because I know what awaits me isn't going to be easy.I once read a post in Humans of New York that said:There's a strange culture in medicine. People are less friendly to each other than I imagined. I got an MD and a PhD in Neuroscience. I'm finishing my residency right now. I guess I thought that everyone would be compassionate, and would help each other, and would be nice to each other. And don't get me wrong - I work with a lot of compassionate people. But the stress just erodes people. There's a lot of tension and anger. We're taught that 80 hours per week is normal and shouldn't be questioned. But at the same time, a huge amount of work that medical interns do is administrative. It could be outsourced without affecting the quality of education or care. And the culture does real harm. I've had two friends commit suicide. One of them was studying anesthesiology at Yale and overdosed in a parking lot. The other jumped off the dorm building at NYU. There's got to be a better way. I don't know, maybe I'm just saying this because I'm stressed. I'm heading to the ER now. I'm almost at the end of my residency. I can see the end of the tunnel. But the tunnel is very damaging.This is the truth, and God knows I can not word it any better.Just a few months ago, one senior of mine - just started her third semester - filed a resignation letter. Rumor has it, she couldn't bear all the tension of being a junior resident. I myself have been questioning my motive of signing up to this tunnel. I didn't even want to be a doctor in the first place, let alone to add a few more torturing years just because everyone expect me to. But apparently life has funny ways to teach me lessons that 'I don't like' does not always mean 'I can not'. So here I am, joining the bandwagon.Indonesian medical school system is notorious for its feudalism. But I guess everywhere is just the same. Medical school, in a way, is very much similar to military. They function based on chains of command, in which the higher rank you are placed, the bigger responsibility you are carrying. I called it 'safety nets'. We, juniors, are minions. We come to the hospital earlier than everybody else, do all the labor works (writing charts, printing journals, preparing slides for morning reports, drawing blood works, collecting sputum, etc), doing everything under supervision, reporting back to our seniors when something doesn't sit right with our patients, and (most of the time) in return, our seniors will teach us how to handle those situations. If you're lucky enough, your seniors will even back you up for those novice mistakes you make. Sounds easy, yes?Well, no.We were 'someone' before we join this league of residency. Some of us worked as directors of some fancy hospitals, some are the sons/daughters of VIPs/professors/people from higher echelons, some even have longer titles than their surnames. But once we enter the ground zero, we are told to strip ourselves off those labels, to grind our teeth and to keep our ego in check. Because in order to be filled with water, you've gotta empty your cups first.A best friend of mine once said, "You're back to school now, so it is important for you to willingly accept to be shaped and molded by your system. Once you're in, you're committing yourself to a life-long learning. So no matter how hard it's going to be, you, after all, are prepared to be a better, wiser physician."And then one day I got to meet a friend of mine, an excellent pediatrician. She told me that she was also on the brink of giving up when the tunnel got darker and darker the deeper she walked. Indeed, residency is not a walk in the park. It consumes your energy and demands half of your life. Those who are managed to get to the end of the tunnel have gone through a voracious battle. And no body stays the same after."Residential program is the place where you are forced to be mature," one of my favorite seniors said. Mature and realistic, I may add.I wish I had someone to hand me down the manual, to tell me how this journey was going to be and whether it was worth it. I wish I had someone I could talk to in times of doubt. Sometimes I feel like the sole reason why I am in this tunnel is because I just want to see how far I can go without losing myself in the process.This suffocation that lingers tight on my chest, whether a slight depression or simply boredom, isn't something I can easily explain to anyone. People are often mesmerized by the shining white coat and the courageous act of saving life Grey's Anatomy style, or even the nobility and wealth that comes along, unaware of the ugly truth masking behind.This profession of mine is truly one of a kind.And just like what I told a dear philosopher friend of mine: if I'm going to go through this hell, I might as well do this right.We all make our choices. I pray mine is a blessing rather than regret.·RELATED QUESTIONIs there is any side effects of not sleeping in a medicated bed?I don't think so! if you are not a medical patient, you can sleep in any bed you feel comfortable with.But for medical patients, it is necessary to sleep on a medicated because it has so many movable parts that offer comfort to them and for their treatment.If you want a high-quality medical bed at your resident, you can easily get a free demonstration on the same day you will contact one of the best reliable online platforms which is Adjustable beds.They will provide you what ever you need in your medical bed. If you want to take a full experience of their medical beds, then you can use their free no obligation home service that will allow you to use their products at your own home.
Bunkie Board Instead of Bed Slats with an Ikea MALM Platform Bed?
Are you making your own?, my son-in-law did that, the same as it sounds like you want, it worked out Great. Good Luck.1. How can i make a nice platform bed for cheap?Get up early on Saturday morning and go to garage sales. Every thing you need is there and cheap, a bed your looking for $20 maybe a little more, I have found some really nice things. As time goes buy and you can afford what you want, recycle and have your own sale!2. What kind of wood is the best and most inexpensive to use for building a platform bed for a california king?Pine or Douglass Fir3. I am working on a platform bed? Where can I buy oversize plywood? At least 60"X80"?if you have a good lumber yard nearby, you can special order there,99 ....they are called 'blows' if all else fails for you, purchase, 2 sheets of 1 1/8" T & G 4'x8' and glue & clamp them together and saw to desired dimensions.4. Does anyone here have a platform bed?My best friend has one and they hurt their shins. I also looked at a few at rooms to go and I banged my shin5. How To Build A Twin Platform BedWe have a guest that will be staying the night, a very messy guest room, and a twin mattress ... on the floor. I decided to get busy and Build A Twin Platform Bed with the thought that one of our kids could use it when they are off at college, renting a room off campus. Eventually, I would like to have a queen size bed in the guest room but this makes sense for now! This twin platform bed was pretty simple and inexpensive to build. It needed to be easy to disassemble so it could be hauled around easily and it needed to be inexpensive because ... this is not meant to be a family heirloom. Nope! It has a purpose to serve on a budget! This post contains affiliate links. When you purchase through an affiliate link, we receive a small commission at no additional cost to you. Disclosure. Our twin size mattress dimensions are 37-1/2 x 73-1/2 x 11 and I built this bed to fit those dimensions. Adjust your cuts to accommodate your mattress size. Note: My cuts are 2-1/2 shorter than our mattress size. This is because the mattress partially sits on top of the 4 x 4 legs. if you choose not to use casters, adjust the cut of the legs. Our twin mattress has a hard bottom and needed less slats than our Naturepedic mattress did. How To Assemble The Twin Platform Bed This bed is actually pretty simple to build! Make your cuts, according to your mattress size, and sand each piece with 120 grit sand paper. With the Kreg Jig, drill three pocket holes in each end of your headboard and footboard panel. Pay attention to what side of the board you want to be visible and make the pocket holes on the opposite side. Next, attach the headboard and footboard panels to the legs with 2-1/2 pocket hole screws. I placed a 1 x 4 under each end of the panel so the panel would sit back a bit from the 4 x 4 leg instead of being flush. The top of the panel and the top of the legs are flush. The next picture will show what I mean! The headboard and footboard assembled. Pretty basic, right? Then, attach the bed rail hooks on each 4 x 4 leg. I attached mine 2-1/2 from the top and as close to the inside edge that I could, in order to leave room for the side rail. Oh my goodness! These are non-mortise bed rail hooks! I struggled with the mortise bed rail hooks I used on our King Size Farmhouse Bed so I was pretty stoked to find these bed rail hooks! Now it was time to attach the bed slat supports. To do this, I laid the 2 x 4 on the inside of the 2 x 10 side rail and placed my 2 x 2 on top so I would know where to attach the 2 x 4. We want the mattress to sit right on top of this platform bed. I used Kreg Clamps and 2-1/2 Deck Plus Screws to attach the bed slat supports. This part was a bit tricky. The bed rail hooks needed to be lined up just right so the bed rail would sit flush with the headboard and footboard. I laid the footboard and headboard on the ground with the hooks attached. Then, I had my husband hold the side rails up against it, where I wanted it to be, and marked the screw holes. I am glad I did it this way because the hooks sit back a bit on the bed rail in order to sit flush. I would not have known that if I had only measured the correct height. The bed rails were pretty easy to attach and it was all flush ... enough! I used Homemade Stain for my Twin Bed. After the bed was stained, I took it apart, laid the pieces on sawhorses, and finished each piece with a coat of wax. I then attached a caster wheel to each leg. After the wax was dry, I took the bed pieces into the guest room and reassembled it. This is where you would measure the inside dimension of your bed so you can cut your bed slats the proper width. I placed the bed slats and side rail blocks where they needed to go. Next, I attached each block to the side rail support by pre-drilling a hole and then used one self-sinking screw in each block. This was a bit tedious as I used my Kreg Clamp on each block to keep it from moving. We are happy with this simple Twin Platform Bed! It was easy and inexpensive to build and should be a good thing to have around when the kids say goodbye to dorm life and rent a room, when they are off at college. Of course, we are also quite happy that our guest will not have to sleep on a mattress, on the floor. How To Make Wood Stain With Common Household Products Fun DIY House Projects You Can Do Too!
Leesa's Sapira Mattress Has Springs but still Comes in a Box
Mattress-in-a-box companies, from Tuft & Needle to Casper, ship foam and latex mattresses to your door for under $900 for a queen size. Most offer a single type, with dimensions being the only thing you can choose from. Leesa is a member of that club, but today it's branching but with a new brand called Sapira. It's supposed to offer a more luxurious mattress that is a hybrid of springs and foam.The queen costs $1,475, $585 more than the 10-inch-thick, all-foam Leesa. It's an inch thicker, too, with a 1.5-inch top layer of high-density foam; a 1.5-inch layer of memory foam; and steel pocket springs in between two, 1-inch layers of stabilizing foam. Pocket springs are encased in their own cloth pouch. With traditional innerspring mattresses, the coils are tied together, so when you lie down, your weight gets transferred across the bed. That means that, in general, you'll be less likely to feel your partner tossing and turning with the pocket spring variety.Related:Nightingale smart home sleep system masks both indoor and outdoor noisesI tried the Sapira out for a couple of nights, and I found this to be very true. Pushing down on one side of the bed left the other side unaffected. I pressed the mattress down about six inches away from my sleeping cat, and he didn't stir.The overall experience of getting the Sapira is pretty similar to the Leesa one. It arrives at your door all boxed up and compressed, and you slice through a few layers of plastic to let it plump up. You'll get 100 days to try out the mattress, and the company will pick it up if you decide not to keep it within that time frame.The Sapira is definitely a dense mattress. The full-size mattress weighs in at 98 pounds, according to the shipping label. Even though it's only an added inch, the Sapira seems thicker than the Leesa. The top layer of foam is certainly soft, but overall the mattress feels pretty firm.Other brands like Helix and Luma have been offering these "hybrid" foam and spring mattresses for a while, and by offering it as a separate, more luxury-minded brand, Leesa can offer another option beyond its single-type-of-firmness mattress.
My Minimalist Wardrobe
Minimalism is very important to me, and not just because of the simplicity of it all. It has helped me distance myself from the world of social conformity, build better relationships, and lessen my addiction to social media. I spend more time getting my work done and less time worrying about whether or not I've got my hands on this season's mom jeans. For those of you who are not really sure what minimalism is beyond owning less things, let me explain. Minimalism goes far past "Less is more." It's a way of limiting yourself to the things that actually provide use, are needed, and improve your life. By owning only what we need, we are abandoning the consumerism our society has adopted and putting that energy toward the things that truly matter. Our family, friends, career, education, and goals become more important than the stuff we've gathered over the years. To cleanse a space is to cleanse a mind.I desire to keep my space simple and clean, yet I want it to be filled with art and nice clothing. I am not a fan of the "plain white button down as a daily outfit" look. I want some variety, but with a limitation on the amount. Here is how I do it.When I began, I easily had 200 pieces of clothing. When I say "pieces of clothing," I include shirts, pants, coats, dresses, scarves, shoes, and bags or purses. One day when I was hanging up clothes, my closet made a very unfriendly creaking sound, and as soon as I turned to investigate, the entire rack was coming off the wall. It was time to let go.As I started getting rid of things, I realized how little I actually wore any of the clothes I owned. I would rotate the same ten tops and three jeans and I only wore one pair of shoes among the eleven pairs I owned. And on top of the massive amount of clothing in my closet, I had a 6-drawer dresser each full of the clothes I never wore. I owned at least five bags, but I could not give you the actual amount because I only ever carried one and the rest meant nothing to me.I follow the general rule that if it does not provide meaning or use in my life, get rid of it. I've been able to follow this… mostly. I still have a hard time getting rid of clothing I do not even want if it still has some use left. I also feel the overwhelming urge to trash everything until I only own two shirts, one pair of pants, and a pair of shoes. Unfortunately, this is not realistic for someone who enjoys a variety and would not want to be caught dead wearing the same thing two days in a row. So, I've gone down to the absolute basics for my own personal style. The climate in my area gets both very hot and very cold, so I have to have a decent amount of clothes for each season. Many days, it starts off cold in the morning and is hot by midday, so I must have clothing that's good for layering. I decided that I had to have at least one outfit for interviews and professional occasions as well as one dress for formal family events. For the most part, deciding what I needed was easy. But the most difficult decisions lied with choosing which items to keep and which to toss out. Every once in a while I make a log of all the clothing I own, track the newest additions as well as the donations, and make sure I am limiting myself to a decent amount of clothing, not going overboard in either direction. Here's what my minimalist closet looks like:Tops: Two flannel shirts, three sweaters, one long-sleeve top, three t-shirts, one blouse, and one gray tank top. Total=11 items.Bottoms: one pair of high-rise jeans, one pair low-rise, one pair of leggings. Total=3 items. Coats: One petticoat, one denim jacket, one blazer, one raincoat, two summer jackets, one work-out jacket. Total=7 items.Shoes: One pair of work shoes, one pair oxfords, two pairs of sneakers, one pair of sandals, one pair of boots. Total=6 items.Dresses: One t-shirt dress, one formal dress, one summer dress. Total=3 items. Accessories: 3 winter scarves, one purse, one book bag. Total=5 items.Overall closet total=35 items.This closet suits me well a good 98% of the time. I find myself occasionally worried about what to wear because I do allow myself to have more options than I probably should. But like I said, I am young! I like options! I like colors! It's okay to be a minimalist and not want stark white pressed shirts only! Color is good. Color is happy. Options are okay.And that's my minimalist wardrobe! My journey began in the beginning of February 2017 and this is where I've gotten in the last year. Much of my inspiration has drawn from the one and only duo The Minimalists. If you have not seen their documentary on Netflix, give it a watch, and you might find it as life changing as I did!Marnie is an LGBTQ poet and storyteller from North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Follow Marnie on tumblr for unpublished poems, prose, and short stories. Purchase Marnie's poetry book "a black and white rainbow" about love, loss, and coming out here.whats the one item of clothing in your wardrobe you'll never throw out ?all of my abercrombie and hollister polos...in every color=]]
11 Best Cheap Leather Sectionals - Complete Buying Guide
If you are looking to decorate your living room, cheap leather sectionals are an ideal choice. Sofas are an essential furniture in a room and without one, a room appears boring and plain. They give an amazing and cozy look to the room. Choosing the best sectional couches for cheap is an important task to make sure you live a comfortable life. There are many cheap sectional sofas available on the market, and it is your task to pick one that is suitable for you. In an attempt to help you find the best cheap leather sectionals, we have formulated this buying guide. How to choose the best cheap leather sectionals? Sectional sofas are large couches that make a comfortable and large seating area for family and friends. These sofas have sections so that you can fit the sofa in any room even if the room size is small. Consider the following tips to find cheap leathers: The first thing to consider is the available space where you have to keep the sofa. If you want to place the leather reclining sectional sofa in a circular space, you should consider buying a C-shaped sofa. L-shaped sofas require a larger and rectangular shaped space to be placed. The available space in your room will allow you to decide whether you need to buy a large leather sectional sofa or a small one. If you have decided to buy cheap leather sectionals, you will have to do some research and get an estimate of sofas from different shops. There are many shops and websites that offer high-quality leather sectional sofas on sale. If you are ordering online, make sure you order one in different sections so that you end up paying less for the unwanted pieces of the sectional sofa. If you are on a tight budget, you can also consider buying used sectional couches for cheap. Another thing to look for in a leather reclining sectional sofa is the fabric. Always make sure that the fabric used on the sofa is comfortable and durable. Without a good quality fabric, the sofa will undergo wear and tear and will start looking old and used soon. Sectional sofas are available in two styles: open chaise end style and closed style sofas. A closed sectional sofa can meet lots of demands as it is more versatile than the open chaise style sectionals. Always go for the one which can be used at different positions and for different purposes. Sectional sofas can take any shape according to the room size and can be turned into a longer sofa and easily blend with the room dcor. If you are still not sure where to start shopping for the cheap leather sectionals, go through our list of the best cheap leather sectionals of 2017. The best small leather sectional sofa that is ideal for small rooms is the 'Dorel Living Small Spaces Configurable Sectional Sofa, Black.' This sofa is one of the best and cheapest leather sectional couches and can add amazing looks to your room. This small leather sectional has a chaise sofa design and can beat all its competitors with its looks and features. Chaise can be used either in left or right position. It is very comfortable and stylish. The best leather sectional recliner is the 'Large Classic and Traditional Brown Bonded Leather Reclining Corner Sectional Sofa.' This sofa is large enough to accommodate a whole family and is very comfortable and durable. It is best suited for rooms with large spaces, such as halls and home cinema rooms. It is suited for big families. Recline is not strong enough. The Coaster Talia 503431 is the best contemporary leather sectional sofa as it is very stylish and comfortable. It adds a contemporary and unique look to the room and blends with all types of modern home dcor. It is ideal for people who want to give a modern look to their homes. It is very stylish and comfortable. The legs of the sofa are hidden beneath the couch. The 'Baxton Studio Abriana Sectional' is a firm genuine leather sectional sofa. It's one of the best cheap leather sectionals you can buy. It is a comfortable and durable one which is easy to clean and maintain. It is almost ready to use when it arrives and that makes it very convenient. The chocolate brown color makes it ideal for placing it in your rooms and halls of any dcor. Moreover, the dark brown color easily hides stains of all kinds. The inner support system of rubber webbing. It is made up of genuine leather. Very little assembly is required. It cannot withstand the rigors of daily use. Poundex Bobkona Atlantic Faux Leather 2-Piece Sectional Sofa is an affordable one with the feel and looks of original leather. This elegant sofa is one of the cheap faux leather sectionals that can add beauty and elegance to a room and you do not have to worry about people using it roughly while snacking, playing games, or watching TV. It is very comfortable and supports the back to give a relaxing feeling. The faux leather is very soft and comfortable. The metal connection between chaise and sofa makes for a sturdy frame. It supports the head and back. It gives a luxury look to the room. It is very affordable. It is very versatile. It is very comfortable. It has an ergonomic design. The Roundhill Furniture Marinio Chocolate Chaise Sectional Sofa is the best leather sectional sofa with chaise. It is a brown leather sectional sofa which is wide enough to accommodate a big family. This sofa is the complete package is it can be used for a variety of purposes. It has a durable frame and can withstand the rigors of daily use. It has soft and comfortable attached backs. It has beautiful and stylish stitching. The faux leather is soft and durable. The arms are plush and comfortable. Chocolate brown color blends with all types of dcor. It is less stuffy. It is very heavy. Detroit White Convertible Sectional Sofa is a white leather sectional sofa with amazing looks and elegant design. This cheap sectional sofa is wide enough to accommodate a large number of people, that is, around 5 to 6. It looks very snappy and can give a luxurious look to a room. The sturdy wooden frame is covered with white premium polyurethane leatherette. It is very versatile and is interchangeable with three styles. It is very elegant. It is very versatile. The cushions are detachable, which makes cleaning easier. It can be easily stained. The legs are thin and weak. Our pick for the best brown leather sectional couch is the Knightsbridge Tufted Scroll Arm Chesterfield 7-Seat L-Shaped Sectional. This sofa is stylish and comfortable and is designed to take the looks of your home to a new level. This beautiful piece of furniture can complement any home dcor. It has tufted back and arms. The frame is made up of wood and rubber. It has an L-shape. It provides enough seating for people. The brown color blends well with the furniture. The frame is strong and well-built. Moe's Home Collection Andreas Right Leather Sectional Sofa is the best gray leather sectional couch. This sofa looks magnificent in any setting and is sure to make the room look luxury and stylish. It is very comfortable and is one of the best leather sectional sofas. It is made up of grain gray leather. The frame is made up of wood. It has an elegant and sturdy design. It is wide and spacious. It supports the back and neck. The couch does not have a good grip on the floor. The Russ Faux Leather Sectional Sofa is a red leather sectional sofa that looks unique. It is a luxurious one and can upgrade any space by giving it a modern look. It is made up of quality materials so that people can feel comfortable. It is very affordable. It is easy to clean. The red color does not complement all types of dcor, so you will have to make sure it fits in your home. Limari Home LIM-72815 Dexter Collection is a sleek and stylish blue leather sectional couch. It is a cheap faux leather couch and is ideal to place in spacious rooms. The modern design makes it perfect for different types of settings. It has a wide and spacious design. The navy blue upholstery gives it a unique look. It is very soft and comfortable. The legs are sturdy and carry the weight properly. It can withstand the rigors of daily use. It is prone to scratches. Finding the best leather sectional is a challenging task, and we have tried our best to make this task easier for you. The above list contains cheap leather sectionals that can complement different types of home dcor so that you can find one that suits your needs.1. What kind of water resistant product would work best with a 100% genuine leather jacket?Saddle soap, available in shoe departments. Talk to Johnnie above you, split a can.2. is it normal for a white genuine-leather handbag to fade into a beige-like color?It mostly depends on what sort of finish you have on the handbag. If its a slick patent leather, then it should not fade, it woudl just need to be polished. If its a soft supple natural look, then its highly likely that it will fade. You might want to consider using shoe polish to brighten it up3. I ordered Genuine Leather Vintage-Style Trench Coat size XLarge, you sent to me size XXLarge, how can I get XL?No YA user is responsible for sending you clothes in the wrong size - better get in touch with the company which you ordered your clothes from and ask them...:-)
Tyres - All You Need to Know
The main materials of modern tyres are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with other compound chemicals.The tyre consists of a body and the tread. While the body provides and e... The main materials of modern tyres are synthetic rubber, natural rubber, fabric and wire, along with other compound chemicals. The tyre consists of a body and the tread. While the body provides and ensures that there is support, the tread provides the traction. In the days before the rubber tyre was invented the tyres were then made up of simply a band of metal fixed and fitted around the wooden wheel so as wear and tear was reduced. Nowadays, most tyres used are that of Pneumatic, which is a body of chords and wires in a doughnut shape in cased in rubber and then filled with compressed air to form the inflatable cushion, these tyres can be found on almost all types of cars, bicycles, motorcycles, trucks, and even aircrafts. Research shows that the first Pneumatic tyre was made in 1887 by John Boyd Dunlop from Scotland, he made it to try and help prevent the headaches that his son was getting from riding his bike on bumpy surfaces. Today over 1 billion tyres are produced annually, globally there are over 400 tyre factories, and the 3 main top makers take up 60% of the global share! So, why are keeping your tyres in good condition so important? Your tyres work hard - cushioning you from bumps, maintaining responsive steering and most importantly allowing you to stop quickly if needed. As one of your vehicles most important features, manufacturers will have carefully selected your tyres from the top makers in the market. They will be chosen for their reliability, performance, and safety, and will be wisely selected to suit your new or used car . However, constant
Decorating with Red Living Room Furniture
Red living room furniture is the perfect solution if you are sick of the same neutral couches that all of the furniture stores have. You might have bought one of these daring pieces a few years ago when they were trendy and now you don't know what to do with it. This style and color of furniture can transition into a lot of different looks if you know how to decorate with it. Here are a few tips for decorating with red living room furniture.Red Living Room FurnitureCoaster 900335 Vinyl Accent Chair, RedAmazon Price: $164.00 $118.99 Buy Now(price as of Aug 4, 2013)Keep It NeutralKeep the rest of your room neutral. You can easily go overboard when you start off with red living room furniture. You might be so excited that you want more of your favorite color in the room. This is where you can really go wrong and create a design disaster. In fact you might not even like your favorite colors when it's all said and done. Instead find ways to compliment red. Let the new furniture be the star. Go with neutral colored walls. This will also give your eyes a place to rest in the room so it doesn't feel like your retinas are burning.Bring the color in through more organic and natural means. This doesn't have to be in your face. There are a lot of leather tones that have a rich brownish red tone to them. This is a more subtle way of getting your favorite color in the space. Red undertones make the room feel warm. You could also stain your fireplace mantle mahogany and install new rich, hardwood floors. This ensures that your furniture has something to relate to. You don't necessarily have to do a theme room; just put together a well though out design plan.Red Coffee TableLexMod Noguchi Triangle Coffee Table 1/2 Glass Red BaseAmazon Price: $910.00 $291.99 Buy Now(price as of Aug 4, 2013)Try a Tuscan ThemeWork within a larger theme. For a Tuscan look you could paint the walls yellow and bring in your favorite artwork featuring the Italian countryside. This artwork often features stucco houses with red tile roofs so it will really tie all of your colors together. Red is also a staple color in modern design. You might not need to invest in all new red furniture. You could just buy one red chair. Keep the lines sleek and modern; no old recliners here. The red for this style needs to be a cherry color so it's bold and daring. Then you can just use it with your existing white, black, brown or gray couch. This will save you money but also means that you won't have to commit to spending a large portion of your decorating budget on something you could easily tire of. Colorful accents will blend right in.Go ModernRed living room furniture was popular a few years ago but now people are favoring more neutral colors of sofa. Part of this has to do with the fact that microsuede is so easy to clean and oftentimes just comes available in taupe especially if you're shopping at an outlet store. However, you can find this in muted terra cotta tones or brick red colors. This will almost never be in a true red tone because of the nature of the fabric. This will be a more updated fabric choice and cheaper too. Paint your walls gray to accent this contemporary vibe. It also helps to tone down the bold furniture color. Plus it updates an older living room set by using a trendy paint color.Red living room furniture doesn't have to stick out like a sore thumb. You can also go retro. In retro styling they used white walls and pops of colors; but of course the pops of color were more dated colors. Red can be a cheerful update to this design style. It's just a matter of having a clear design direction and being able to incorporate the furniture into an overall theme or idea. It also allows you to decorate with either black or turquoise as an accent color. Since this is such a bold palette you should use this on your window curtain choices or your accent pillows. It's just too saturated to use as a wall color. This allows you to get your favorite color and a room that you can still live in.
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