Understand Table Glass

An Introduction to table glass

This is a list of amphibians found in Guatemala. There are 158 amphibian species recorded in Guatemala, which are grouped in three orders: caecilians (Gymnophiona), salamanders (Caudata) and frogs and toads (Anura). The IUCN considers that 33 of these species are critically endangered, 27 endangered, 11 near threatened and 21 vulnerable.

This list is largely derived from the database listing of AmphibiaWeb and Campbell's checklist.

Frogs and toads (Anura) of table glass

RhinophrynidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Rhinophrynidae

Rhinophrynida is a monotypical family which contains one single species (Rhinophrynus dorsalis), distributed from southern Texas through Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador to Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Rhinophrynus dorsalis, commonly known as the Mexican burrowing toad, grows to 8cm (3.1in) in length, and usually has red spots on its bloated body with a red stripe along the center of its back. It has short legs, and a small, pointed head. Its feet have horny, shovel-like appendages which, along with the short, powerful legs, aid it in digging. Its eyes are relatively small, and the tympanum is not visible.

Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis Dumril & Bibron, 1841CraugastoridaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Craugastoridae

Craugastor adamastus Campbell 1994 [E]

Craugastor alfredi (Boulenger, 1898) [VU]

Craugastor amniscola Campbell & Savage, 2000

Craugastor aphanus Campbell 1994 [E, VU]

Craugastor bocourti (Brocchi, 1877) [E, VU]

Craugastor brocchi (Boulenger, 1882) [VU]

Craugastor campbelli (Smith, 2005) [E]

Craugastor chac Savage, 1987

Craugastor charadra Campbell & Savage, 2000 [EN]

Craugastor daryi Ford & Savage, 1884 [E, EN]

Craugastor greggi Bumzahem, 1955 [CR]

Craugastor inachus Campbell & Savage, 2000 [E, EN]

Craugastor laticeps (A. Dumril, 1853)

Craugastor lineatus (Brocchi, 1879) [CR]

Craugastor loki (Shannon & Werler, 1955)

Craugastor matudai Taylor [VU]

Craugastor myllomyllon (Savage, 2000) (E)

Craugastor nefrens (Smith, 2005)

Craugastor palenque Campbell & Savage, 2000

Craugastor psephosypharus Campbell, Savage & Meyer, 1994 [VU]

Craugastor pygmaeus Taylor, 1936

Craugastor rhodopis (Cope, 1867)

Craugastor rivulus Campbell & Savage, 2000

Craugastor rostralis (Werner, 1896)

Craugastor rupinius Campbell & Savage, 2000

Craugastor sabrinus Campbell & Savage, 2000

Craugastor sandersoni Schmidt, 1941

Craugastor stuarti Lynch, 1967

Craugastor trachydermus Campbell 1994

Craugastor xucanebi Stuart, 1941LeptodactylidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Leptodactylidae

Leptodactylidae is a large and diverse family of frogs that are widely distributed throughout Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. The family includes terrestrial, burrowing, aquatic, and arboreal members, inhabiting a wide range of different habitats. There are roughly 50 genera, with approximately 1100 leptodactylid species, 4 of which occur in Guatemala.

Tungara frog Engystomops pustulosus (Cope, 1864)

Mexican white-lipped frog Leptodactylus fragilis (Brocchi, 1878)

Leptodactylus labialis (Cope, 1877)

Leptodactylus melanonotus (Hallowell, 1860)EleutherodactylidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Eleutherodactylidae

Eleutherodactylidae is a large family of frogs that are distributed in the neotropics, from the south of Texas, through Central America to the north of South America. 3 species occur in Guatemala.

Eleutherodactylus leprus Cope, 1879 [VU]

Eleutherodactylus pipilans Taylor, 1940

Eleutherodactylus rubrimaculatus Taylor & Smith, 1945 [VU]BufonidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Bufonidae

True toads (Bufonidae) are a family in the order of Anura (frogs and toads). They are the only family of anurans all members of which are known as "toads". True toads are widespread and occur natively on every continent except Australia and Antarctica, inhabiting a variety of environments, from arid areas to rainforest. Most lay eggs in paired strings that hatch into tadpoles. True toads are toothless and generally warty in appearance. They have a pair of parotoid glands on the back of their heads. These glands contain an alkaloid poison which the toads excrete when stressed. Some toads, like the cane toad Bufo marinus, are more toxic than others. The bufonids now comprise more than 35 genera, Bufo being the most widespread and well known. 12 species occur in Guatemala.

Bocourt's toad Bufo bocourti Brocchi, 1877

Campbell's forest toad Bufo campbelli Mendelson, 1994

Dwarf toad Bufo canaliferus Cope, 1877

Southern round-gland toad Bufo coccifer Cope, 1866

Jalapa toad Bufo ibarrai Stuart, 1954 [EN]

Yellow toad Bufo luetkenii Boulenger, 1891

Large-crested toad Bufo macrocristatus Firschein & Smith, 1957 [VU]

Cane toad Bufo marinus (Linnaeus, 1758)

Volcan Tacana toad Bufo tacanensis P. Smith, 1952 [EN]

Bufo tutelarius Mendelson, 1997 [EN]

Gulf Coast toad Bufo valliceps Wiegmann, 1833

Bufo wilsoni Baylor & Stuart, 1961HylidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Hylidae

Hylidae is a wide-ranging family of frogs commonly referred to as "tree frogs and their allies". However, the hylids include a diversity of frog species, many of which do not live in trees, but are terrestrial or semi-aquatic.

Most hylids show adaptations suitable for an arboreal lifestyle, including forward-facing eyes providing binocular vision, and adhesive pads on the fingers and toes. In the non-arboreal species, these features may be greatly reduced, or absent. The Cyclorana species are burrowing frogs, that spend much of their lives underground. Hylids mostly feed on insects and other invertebrates, but some larger species can feed on small vertebrates. Hylids lay their eggs in a range of different locations, depending on species. Many use ponds, or puddles that collect in the holes of their trees, while others use bromeliads or other water-holding plants. Other species lay their eggs on the leaves of vegetation overhanging water, allowing the tadpoles to drop into the pond when they hatch. A few species use fast-flowing streams, attaching the eggs firmly to the substrate. The tadpoles of these species have suckers enabling them to hold onto rocks after they hatch. Another unusual adaptation is found in some South American hylids, which brood the eggs on the back of the female. Hylids are distributed in the Americas, Eurasia, extreme north of Africa, Australia, New Guinea and Japan. 38 species occur in Guatemala.

Red-eyed tree frog Agalychnis callidryas (Cope, 1862)

Black-eyed tree frog Agalychnis moreletii (Dumril, 1853) [CR]

Bromeliad treefrog Bromeliohyla bromeliacia Schmidt, 1933 [EN]

Hourglass treefrog Dendropsophus ebraccatus Cope, 1874

Yellow treefrog Dendropsophus microcephalus Cope, 1886

Mertens' yellow treefrog Dendropsophus robertmertensi Taylor, 1937

Schmidt's mountain brook frog Duellmanohyla schmidtorum (Stuart, 1954) [VU]

Copan brook frog Duellmanohyla soralia (Wilson & MCCranie, 1985) [CR]

Guatemala treefrog Ecnomiohyla minera Wilson, McCranie & Williams, 1985 [E, EN]

Copan treefrog Ecnomiohyla salvaje Wilson, McCranie & Williams, 1985 [CR]

Bocourt's tree frog Hyla bocourti Mocquard, 1899 [E, CR]

Hyla perkinsi Campbell & Brodie, 1992 [E, CR]

Walker's tree frog Hyla walkeri Stuart, 1954 [VU]

Plectrohyla acanthodes Duellman & Campbell, 1992 [CR]

Plectrohyla avia Stuart, 1953 [CR]

Ptychohyla dendrophasma Campbell, Smith & Acevedo, 2000 [CR]

Plectrohyla glandulosa (Boulenger, 1883) [EN]

Plectrohyla guatemalensis Brocchi, 1877 [CR]

Plectrohyla hartwegi Duellman, 1968 [CR]

Plectrohyla ixil Stuart, 1942 [CR]

Plectrohyla matudai Hartweg, 1941 [VU]

Plectrohyla pokomchi Duellman & Campbell, 1984 [E, CR]

Plectrohyla quecchi Stuart, 1942 [E, CR]

Plectrohyla sagorum Hartweg, 1941 [EN]

Plectrohyla tecunumani Duellman & Campbell, 1984 [E, CR]

Plectrohyla teuchestes Duellman & Campbell, 1992 [E, CR]

Ptychohyla euthysanota (Kellogg, 1928)

Ptychohyla macrotympanum (Tanner, 1957) [CR]

Ptychohyla panchoi Duellman & Campbell, 1982 [E, EN]

Ptychohyla hypomykter McCranie & Wilson, 1993 [CR]

Ptychohyla sanctaecrucis Campbell & Smith, 1992 [E, CR]

Scinax staufferi (Cope, 1865)

Smilisca baudinii (Dumril & Bibron, 1841)

Smilisca cyanosticta (Smith, 1953)

Mahogany treefrog Tlalocohyla loquax Gaige & Stuart, 1934

Painted treefrog Tlalocohyla picta (Gnther, 1901)

Veined treefrog Trachycephalus venulosus Laurenti, 1768

Triprion petasatus (Cope, 1865)CentrolenidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Centrolenidae

Glass frogs (Centrolenidae) are a family of generally small frogs, ranging from 3 to 7.5 centimetres (1.2 to 3.0in) in length, distributed from southern Mexico, through Central America and South America. While the general background coloration of most glass frogs is primarily lime green, the abdominal skin of some members of this family is transparent. The internal viscera, including the heart, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are visible through this translucent skin, hence the common name. There is one species in Guatemala.

Fleischmann's glass frog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Boettger, 1893)MicrohylidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Microhylidae

Microhylidae is a geographically widespread family of frogs. Microhylids are mostly small frogs. Many species are below 1.5 centimetres (0.59in) in length, although some species are as large as 9 centimetres (3.5in). They can be arboreal or terrestrial, and some will even habit close to water. The ground dwellers are often found under leaf litter within forests, occasionally venturing out at night to hunt. There are two main shapes for the microhylids, one with wide bodies and narrow mouths, and the other with normal frog proportions. Those with narrow mouths generally eat termites and ants, and the others have diets typical of most frogs. The species of the genus Breviceps are burrowing frogs found in the arid regions of Africa. Some of their species will even lay their eggs under ground.

Frogs from Microhylidae occur throughout the tropical and warm temperate regions of the Americas, Africa, eastern India, Sri Lanka, south-east Asia, through New Guinea and Australia. There are nine subfamilies, 68 genera, and 495 species worldwide, 5 of which occur in Guatemala.

Gastrophryne elegans (Boulenger, 1882)

Gastrophryne usta (Cope, 1866)

Hypopachus barberi Schmidt, 1939 [VU]

Hypophachus championi Stuart, 1940

Hypopachus variolosus (cope, 1866)RanidaeOrder: Anura.

Family: Ranidae

The true frogs, family Ranidae, have the widest distribution of any frog family. They are abundant throughout most of the world, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Typically, true frogs are smooth, moist-skinned frogs, with large, powerful legs and extensively webbed feet. True frogs vary greatly in size, ranging from smallsuch as the wood frog (Rana sylvatica)to the largest frog in the world, the Goliath frog (Conraua goliath).

Many of the true frogs are aquatic or live close to water. Most species lay their eggs in the water and go through a tadpole stage. However, as with most families of frogs, there is large variation of habitat within the family. Those of the genus Tomopterna are burrowing frogs native to Africa and exhibit most of the characteristics common to burrowing frogs around the world. There are also arboreal species of true frogs, and the family includes some of the very few amphibians that can live in brackish water. There are 6 species in Guatemala.

Rana berlandieri Baird, 1854

Rana forreri Boulenger, 1883

Rana juliani Hillis & de S, 1988

Rana macroglossa Brocchi, 1877 [VU]

Rana maculata Brocchi, 1877

Rana vaillanti Brocchi, 1877

Salamanders (Caudata) of table glass

PlethodontidaeOrder: Caudata.

Family: Plethodontidae

The Plethodontidae, or lungless salamanders, are a family of salamanders. Most species are native to the Western Hemisphere, from British Columbia to Brazil, although a few species are found in Sardinia, Europe south of the Alps, and South Korea.

A number of features distinguish the Plethodontids from other salamanders. Most significantly, they lack lungs, conducting respiration through their skin, and the tissues lining their mouths. Another distinctive feature is the presence of a vertical slit between the nostril and upper lip, known as the "naso-labial groove". The groove is lined with glands, and enhances the salamander's chemoreception. Due to their modest size and low metabolism, they are able to feed on prey such as collembola, which are usually too small for other terrestrial vertebrates. This gives them access to a whole ecological niche with minimal competition from other groups. They are by far the largest group of salamanders. There are about 380 species worldwide, of which 41 occur in Guatemala.

Oak forest salamander Bolitoglossa cuchumatana (Stuart, 1943) [E]

Doflein's salamander Bolitoglossa dofleini (Werner, 1903)

Dunn's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa dunni (Schmidt, 1933) [EN]

Engelhardt's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa engelhardti (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]

Yellow-legged climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flavimembris (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]

Yellow-belly climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flaviventris (Schmidt, 1936)

Franklin's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa franklini (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]

Hartweg's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa hartwegi Wake & Brame, 1969

Coban climbing salamander Bolitoglossa helmrichi (Schmidt, 1936) [E]

Jackson's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa jacksoni Elias, 1984 [E]

Lincoln's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa lincolni (Stuart, 1943)

Meliana climbing salamander Bolitoglossa meliana Wake & Lynch, 1982 [E, EN]

Mexican climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mexicana Dumril, Bibron & Dumril, 1854

Cope's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa morio (Cope, 1869) [E]

Muller's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mulleri (Brocchi, 1883) [VU]

Southern banana salamander Bolitoglossa occidentalis Taylor, 1941

O'Donnell's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa odonnelli (Stuart, 1943) [EN]

Bolitoglossa resplendens McCoy & Walker, 1966

Long-nosed climbing salamander Bolitoglossa rostrata (Brocchi, 1883) [VU]

Northern banana salamander Bolitoglossa rufescens (Cope, 1869)

Salvin's salamander Bolitoglossa salvinii (Gray, 1868) [EN]

Stuart's salamander Bolitoglossa stuarti Wake & Brame, 1969 [EN]

Yucatan salamander Bolitoglossa yucatana (Peters, 1882)

Finca Chiblac salamander Bradytriton silus Wake & Elias, 1983 [E, CR]

Monzon's hidden salamander Cryptotriton monzoni (Campbell & Smith, 1998) [E, CR]

Baja Verapaz salamander Cryptotriton veraepacis (Lynch & Wake, 1978) [E, EN]

Wake's hidden salamander Cryptotriton wakei (Campbell & Smith, 1998)

Common bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton bromeliacius (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]

Cuchumatanes bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton cuchumatanus (Lynch & Wake, 1975) [E, CR]

Guatemalan bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton rabbi (Lynch & Wake, 1975) [EN]

Cerro Pozo de Agua moss salamander Nototriton brodiei Campbell & Smith, 1998

Stuart's moss salamander Nototriton stuarti Wake & Campbell, 2000 [E]

Long-limbed salamander Nyctanolis pernix Elias & Wake, 1983 [EN]

White-crowned worm salamander Oedipina elongata (Schmidt, 1936)

Chimaltenango worm salamander Oedipina ignea Stuart, 1952

Narrow-footed worm salamander Oedipina stenopodia Brodie & Campbell, 1993 [E, EN]

Taylor's worm salamander Oedipina taylori Stuart, 1952

Brown false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea brunnata Bumzahem & Smith, 1955 [CR]

Jalpa false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea exspectata Stuart, 1954 [E, CR]

Goebel's false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea goebeli (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]

Royal false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea rex (Dunn, 1921)

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Paterson"How Gilbert Died""How the Favourite Beat Us""Saltbush Bill""The Travelling Post Office""A Voice from the Town"------Cast of table glassMarilyn Maxwell as Marion ParmaleePaulette Goddard as Betty BarnesEva Gabor as Gogo MontaineBarbara Lawrence as Marta JensenCecil Kellaway as Patrick J. 'P.J.' SullivanRobert Hutton as Charlie JohnsonLeif Erickson as Edgar BlevinsTom Conway as Maharajah of Kim-KeporeMichael Romanoff as Prince Romanoff (as Prince Michael Romanoff)Florence Bates as Mrs. Nora SullivanEl Brendel as Papa JensenLaurette Luez as Lisa JonesRobert Bice as Jack ParmaleeAram Katcher as Louis-Jean VacheronGloria Christian as Cora BlevinsByron Foulger as Ernest BoggsBibs Borman as Berta CourtallezParis Models as Himself------Work of table glassSummer Flowers in a VaseStill life with peonies and rosesDaisies, Poppies And Wild RosesSummer blooms in a glass vaseSpaniels hunting duckStill lifeSetters flushing out ducksChrysanthemums in a brass urn, and a silver tray and jug on a draped tableThe ChaseSetters flushing out duckBlossom branches and peonies in a vaseOn the pointOn the point 2Pointers on the scentPointers by the edge of a lakeA pointer and a setter on the scentThe Garden GateTwo Pointers Hunting by a PathLe chemin aux arbres et fleurs------Graveyard of table glassPart of the graveyard was built over in the 1960s for a hall and meeting rooms; most of the rest has been paved over. There remain (2010) about ten gravestones.The Irish actor and poet John Cunningham is buried in the graveyard. In the quiet churchyard, not far from the east window lies, on the ground, a stone slab, part of a table monument, its four supporting pillars lying half buried in the soil beneath it. This is one of the most interesting monuments in the city. The inscription upon it, though partly obliterated, can be read as follows:------First Division of table glassThe First Division featured three new clubs in a league of 20, reduced from 21 the previous season after Wellington and Sherborne Town were promoted to the Premier Division, Backwell United resigned and Weston St Johns were relegated. Both the latter two clubs joined the Somerset County League.Odd Down, relegated from the Premier Division.Gillingham Town, promoted as runners-up in the Dorset Premier Football League.Wells City, promoted as runners-up in the Somerset County League.Portishead F.C. changed their name to Portishead Town F.C.Final table
Understand Table Glass
An Introduction to table glassThis is a list of amphibians found in Guatemala. There are 158 amphibian species recorded in Guatemala, which are grouped in three orders: caecilians (Gymnophiona), salamanders (Caudata) and frogs and toads (Anura). The IUCN considers that 33 of these species are critically endangered, 27 endangered, 11 near threatened and 21 vulnerable.This list is largely derived from the database listing of AmphibiaWeb and Campbell's checklist.Frogs and toads (Anura) of table glassRhinophrynidaeOrder: Anura.Family: RhinophrynidaeRhinophrynida is a monotypical family which contains one single species (Rhinophrynus dorsalis), distributed from southern Texas through Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador to Nicaragua and Costa Rica. Rhinophrynus dorsalis, commonly known as the Mexican burrowing toad, grows to 8cm (3.1in) in length, and usually has red spots on its bloated body with a red stripe along the center of its back. It has short legs, and a small, pointed head. Its feet have horny, shovel-like appendages which, along with the short, powerful legs, aid it in digging. Its eyes are relatively small, and the tympanum is not visible.Mexican burrowing toad Rhinophrynus dorsalis Dumril & Bibron, 1841CraugastoridaeOrder: Anura.Family: CraugastoridaeCraugastor adamastus Campbell 1994 [E]Craugastor alfredi (Boulenger, 1898) [VU]Craugastor amniscola Campbell & Savage, 2000Craugastor aphanus Campbell 1994 [E, VU]Craugastor bocourti (Brocchi, 1877) [E, VU]Craugastor brocchi (Boulenger, 1882) [VU]Craugastor campbelli (Smith, 2005) [E]Craugastor chac Savage, 1987Craugastor charadra Campbell & Savage, 2000 [EN]Craugastor daryi Ford & Savage, 1884 [E, EN]Craugastor greggi Bumzahem, 1955 [CR]Craugastor inachus Campbell & Savage, 2000 [E, EN]Craugastor laticeps (A. Dumril, 1853)Craugastor lineatus (Brocchi, 1879) [CR]Craugastor loki (Shannon & Werler, 1955)Craugastor matudai Taylor [VU]Craugastor myllomyllon (Savage, 2000) (E)Craugastor nefrens (Smith, 2005)Craugastor palenque Campbell & Savage, 2000Craugastor psephosypharus Campbell, Savage & Meyer, 1994 [VU]Craugastor pygmaeus Taylor, 1936Craugastor rhodopis (Cope, 1867)Craugastor rivulus Campbell & Savage, 2000Craugastor rostralis (Werner, 1896)Craugastor rupinius Campbell & Savage, 2000Craugastor sabrinus Campbell & Savage, 2000Craugastor sandersoni Schmidt, 1941Craugastor stuarti Lynch, 1967Craugastor trachydermus Campbell 1994Craugastor xucanebi Stuart, 1941LeptodactylidaeOrder: Anura.Family: LeptodactylidaeLeptodactylidae is a large and diverse family of frogs that are widely distributed throughout Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, and South America. The family includes terrestrial, burrowing, aquatic, and arboreal members, inhabiting a wide range of different habitats. There are roughly 50 genera, with approximately 1100 leptodactylid species, 4 of which occur in Guatemala.Tungara frog Engystomops pustulosus (Cope, 1864)Mexican white-lipped frog Leptodactylus fragilis (Brocchi, 1878)Leptodactylus labialis (Cope, 1877)Leptodactylus melanonotus (Hallowell, 1860)EleutherodactylidaeOrder: Anura.Family: EleutherodactylidaeEleutherodactylidae is a large family of frogs that are distributed in the neotropics, from the south of Texas, through Central America to the north of South America. 3 species occur in Guatemala.Eleutherodactylus leprus Cope, 1879 [VU]Eleutherodactylus pipilans Taylor, 1940Eleutherodactylus rubrimaculatus Taylor & Smith, 1945 [VU]BufonidaeOrder: Anura.Family: BufonidaeTrue toads (Bufonidae) are a family in the order of Anura (frogs and toads). They are the only family of anurans all members of which are known as "toads". True toads are widespread and occur natively on every continent except Australia and Antarctica, inhabiting a variety of environments, from arid areas to rainforest. Most lay eggs in paired strings that hatch into tadpoles. True toads are toothless and generally warty in appearance. They have a pair of parotoid glands on the back of their heads. These glands contain an alkaloid poison which the toads excrete when stressed. Some toads, like the cane toad Bufo marinus, are more toxic than others. The bufonids now comprise more than 35 genera, Bufo being the most widespread and well known. 12 species occur in Guatemala.Bocourt's toad Bufo bocourti Brocchi, 1877Campbell's forest toad Bufo campbelli Mendelson, 1994Dwarf toad Bufo canaliferus Cope, 1877Southern round-gland toad Bufo coccifer Cope, 1866Jalapa toad Bufo ibarrai Stuart, 1954 [EN]Yellow toad Bufo luetkenii Boulenger, 1891Large-crested toad Bufo macrocristatus Firschein & Smith, 1957 [VU]Cane toad Bufo marinus (Linnaeus, 1758)Volcan Tacana toad Bufo tacanensis P. Smith, 1952 [EN]Bufo tutelarius Mendelson, 1997 [EN]Gulf Coast toad Bufo valliceps Wiegmann, 1833Bufo wilsoni Baylor & Stuart, 1961HylidaeOrder: Anura.Family: HylidaeHylidae is a wide-ranging family of frogs commonly referred to as "tree frogs and their allies". However, the hylids include a diversity of frog species, many of which do not live in trees, but are terrestrial or semi-aquatic.Most hylids show adaptations suitable for an arboreal lifestyle, including forward-facing eyes providing binocular vision, and adhesive pads on the fingers and toes. In the non-arboreal species, these features may be greatly reduced, or absent. The Cyclorana species are burrowing frogs, that spend much of their lives underground. Hylids mostly feed on insects and other invertebrates, but some larger species can feed on small vertebrates. Hylids lay their eggs in a range of different locations, depending on species. Many use ponds, or puddles that collect in the holes of their trees, while others use bromeliads or other water-holding plants. Other species lay their eggs on the leaves of vegetation overhanging water, allowing the tadpoles to drop into the pond when they hatch. A few species use fast-flowing streams, attaching the eggs firmly to the substrate. The tadpoles of these species have suckers enabling them to hold onto rocks after they hatch. Another unusual adaptation is found in some South American hylids, which brood the eggs on the back of the female. Hylids are distributed in the Americas, Eurasia, extreme north of Africa, Australia, New Guinea and Japan. 38 species occur in Guatemala.Red-eyed tree frog Agalychnis callidryas (Cope, 1862)Black-eyed tree frog Agalychnis moreletii (Dumril, 1853) [CR]Bromeliad treefrog Bromeliohyla bromeliacia Schmidt, 1933 [EN]Hourglass treefrog Dendropsophus ebraccatus Cope, 1874Yellow treefrog Dendropsophus microcephalus Cope, 1886Mertens' yellow treefrog Dendropsophus robertmertensi Taylor, 1937Schmidt's mountain brook frog Duellmanohyla schmidtorum (Stuart, 1954) [VU]Copan brook frog Duellmanohyla soralia (Wilson & MCCranie, 1985) [CR]Guatemala treefrog Ecnomiohyla minera Wilson, McCranie & Williams, 1985 [E, EN]Copan treefrog Ecnomiohyla salvaje Wilson, McCranie & Williams, 1985 [CR]Bocourt's tree frog Hyla bocourti Mocquard, 1899 [E, CR]Hyla perkinsi Campbell & Brodie, 1992 [E, CR]Walker's tree frog Hyla walkeri Stuart, 1954 [VU]Plectrohyla acanthodes Duellman & Campbell, 1992 [CR]Plectrohyla avia Stuart, 1953 [CR]Ptychohyla dendrophasma Campbell, Smith & Acevedo, 2000 [CR]Plectrohyla glandulosa (Boulenger, 1883) [EN]Plectrohyla guatemalensis Brocchi, 1877 [CR]Plectrohyla hartwegi Duellman, 1968 [CR]Plectrohyla ixil Stuart, 1942 [CR]Plectrohyla matudai Hartweg, 1941 [VU]Plectrohyla pokomchi Duellman & Campbell, 1984 [E, CR]Plectrohyla quecchi Stuart, 1942 [E, CR]Plectrohyla sagorum Hartweg, 1941 [EN]Plectrohyla tecunumani Duellman & Campbell, 1984 [E, CR]Plectrohyla teuchestes Duellman & Campbell, 1992 [E, CR]Ptychohyla euthysanota (Kellogg, 1928)Ptychohyla macrotympanum (Tanner, 1957) [CR]Ptychohyla panchoi Duellman & Campbell, 1982 [E, EN]Ptychohyla hypomykter McCranie & Wilson, 1993 [CR]Ptychohyla sanctaecrucis Campbell & Smith, 1992 [E, CR]Scinax staufferi (Cope, 1865)Smilisca baudinii (Dumril & Bibron, 1841)Smilisca cyanosticta (Smith, 1953)Mahogany treefrog Tlalocohyla loquax Gaige & Stuart, 1934Painted treefrog Tlalocohyla picta (Gnther, 1901)Veined treefrog Trachycephalus venulosus Laurenti, 1768Triprion petasatus (Cope, 1865)CentrolenidaeOrder: Anura.Family: CentrolenidaeGlass frogs (Centrolenidae) are a family of generally small frogs, ranging from 3 to 7.5 centimetres (1.2 to 3.0in) in length, distributed from southern Mexico, through Central America and South America. While the general background coloration of most glass frogs is primarily lime green, the abdominal skin of some members of this family is transparent. The internal viscera, including the heart, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are visible through this translucent skin, hence the common name. There is one species in Guatemala.Fleischmann's glass frog Hyalinobatrachium fleischmanni (Boettger, 1893)MicrohylidaeOrder: Anura.Family: MicrohylidaeMicrohylidae is a geographically widespread family of frogs. Microhylids are mostly small frogs. Many species are below 1.5 centimetres (0.59in) in length, although some species are as large as 9 centimetres (3.5in). They can be arboreal or terrestrial, and some will even habit close to water. The ground dwellers are often found under leaf litter within forests, occasionally venturing out at night to hunt. There are two main shapes for the microhylids, one with wide bodies and narrow mouths, and the other with normal frog proportions. Those with narrow mouths generally eat termites and ants, and the others have diets typical of most frogs. The species of the genus Breviceps are burrowing frogs found in the arid regions of Africa. Some of their species will even lay their eggs under ground.Frogs from Microhylidae occur throughout the tropical and warm temperate regions of the Americas, Africa, eastern India, Sri Lanka, south-east Asia, through New Guinea and Australia. There are nine subfamilies, 68 genera, and 495 species worldwide, 5 of which occur in Guatemala.Gastrophryne elegans (Boulenger, 1882)Gastrophryne usta (Cope, 1866)Hypopachus barberi Schmidt, 1939 [VU]Hypophachus championi Stuart, 1940Hypopachus variolosus (cope, 1866)RanidaeOrder: Anura.Family: RanidaeThe true frogs, family Ranidae, have the widest distribution of any frog family. They are abundant throughout most of the world, occurring on all continents except Antarctica. Typically, true frogs are smooth, moist-skinned frogs, with large, powerful legs and extensively webbed feet. True frogs vary greatly in size, ranging from smallsuch as the wood frog (Rana sylvatica)to the largest frog in the world, the Goliath frog (Conraua goliath).Many of the true frogs are aquatic or live close to water. Most species lay their eggs in the water and go through a tadpole stage. However, as with most families of frogs, there is large variation of habitat within the family. Those of the genus Tomopterna are burrowing frogs native to Africa and exhibit most of the characteristics common to burrowing frogs around the world. There are also arboreal species of true frogs, and the family includes some of the very few amphibians that can live in brackish water. There are 6 species in Guatemala.Rana berlandieri Baird, 1854Rana forreri Boulenger, 1883Rana juliani Hillis & de S, 1988Rana macroglossa Brocchi, 1877 [VU]Rana maculata Brocchi, 1877Rana vaillanti Brocchi, 1877Salamanders (Caudata) of table glassPlethodontidaeOrder: Caudata.Family: PlethodontidaeThe Plethodontidae, or lungless salamanders, are a family of salamanders. Most species are native to the Western Hemisphere, from British Columbia to Brazil, although a few species are found in Sardinia, Europe south of the Alps, and South Korea.A number of features distinguish the Plethodontids from other salamanders. Most significantly, they lack lungs, conducting respiration through their skin, and the tissues lining their mouths. Another distinctive feature is the presence of a vertical slit between the nostril and upper lip, known as the "naso-labial groove". The groove is lined with glands, and enhances the salamander's chemoreception. Due to their modest size and low metabolism, they are able to feed on prey such as collembola, which are usually too small for other terrestrial vertebrates. This gives them access to a whole ecological niche with minimal competition from other groups. They are by far the largest group of salamanders. There are about 380 species worldwide, of which 41 occur in Guatemala.Oak forest salamander Bolitoglossa cuchumatana (Stuart, 1943) [E]Doflein's salamander Bolitoglossa dofleini (Werner, 1903)Dunn's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa dunni (Schmidt, 1933) [EN]Engelhardt's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa engelhardti (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]Yellow-legged climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flavimembris (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]Yellow-belly climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flaviventris (Schmidt, 1936)Franklin's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa franklini (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]Hartweg's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa hartwegi Wake & Brame, 1969Coban climbing salamander Bolitoglossa helmrichi (Schmidt, 1936) [E]Jackson's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa jacksoni Elias, 1984 [E]Lincoln's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa lincolni (Stuart, 1943)Meliana climbing salamander Bolitoglossa meliana Wake & Lynch, 1982 [E, EN]Mexican climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mexicana Dumril, Bibron & Dumril, 1854Cope's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa morio (Cope, 1869) [E]Muller's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mulleri (Brocchi, 1883) [VU]Southern banana salamander Bolitoglossa occidentalis Taylor, 1941O'Donnell's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa odonnelli (Stuart, 1943) [EN]Bolitoglossa resplendens McCoy & Walker, 1966Long-nosed climbing salamander Bolitoglossa rostrata (Brocchi, 1883) [VU]Northern banana salamander Bolitoglossa rufescens (Cope, 1869)Salvin's salamander Bolitoglossa salvinii (Gray, 1868) [EN]Stuart's salamander Bolitoglossa stuarti Wake & Brame, 1969 [EN]Yucatan salamander Bolitoglossa yucatana (Peters, 1882)Finca Chiblac salamander Bradytriton silus Wake & Elias, 1983 [E, CR]Monzon's hidden salamander Cryptotriton monzoni (Campbell & Smith, 1998) [E, CR]Baja Verapaz salamander Cryptotriton veraepacis (Lynch & Wake, 1978) [E, EN]Wake's hidden salamander Cryptotriton wakei (Campbell & Smith, 1998)Common bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton bromeliacius (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]Cuchumatanes bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton cuchumatanus (Lynch & Wake, 1975) [E, CR]Guatemalan bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton rabbi (Lynch & Wake, 1975) [EN]Cerro Pozo de Agua moss salamander Nototriton brodiei Campbell & Smith, 1998Stuart's moss salamander Nototriton stuarti Wake & Campbell, 2000 [E]Long-limbed salamander Nyctanolis pernix Elias & Wake, 1983 [EN]White-crowned worm salamander Oedipina elongata (Schmidt, 1936)Chimaltenango worm salamander Oedipina ignea Stuart, 1952Narrow-footed worm salamander Oedipina stenopodia Brodie & Campbell, 1993 [E, EN]Taylor's worm salamander Oedipina taylori Stuart, 1952Brown false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea brunnata Bumzahem & Smith, 1955 [CR]Jalpa false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea exspectata Stuart, 1954 [E, CR]Goebel's false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea goebeli (Schmidt, 1936) [EN]Royal false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea rex (Dunn, 1921)
Introduction to Table Glass - Danmarks Nste Topmodel of Table Glass
Danmarks Nste Topmodel of table glassDanmarks Nste Topmodel, cycle 5 was the fifth cycle of Danmarks Nste Topmodel. Caroline Fleming remained as the show's host for season five. The season began to air on September 25, 2014.Among with the prizes was a modeling contract with Unique Model Management and the cover spread in COVER magazine Denmark.The winner was 17-year-old Sarah Kildevld Madsen from Horsens. The following year Kildevld Madsen's younger brother, Daniel, won the following cycle of Danmarks Nste Topmodel.------Francis Libermann of table glassFrancis Mary Paul Libermann (French: Franois-Marie-Paul Libermann; born Jacob Libermann; 14 April 1802 2 February 1852) was a 19th-century French Jewish convert to Catholicism, member of the Spiritan Congregation. He is best known for founding the Congregation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary which later merged with the Congregation of the Holy Spirit (Spiritans). He is often referred to as "The Second Founder of the Spiritans". He was declared venerable in the Roman Catholic Church on 1 June 1876, by Pope Pius IX------Carmel College, Darlington of table glassCarmel College (formerly Carmel RC College) is a secondary school on The Headlands in Mowden, Darlington, England. It also has a sixth form, Carmel College Sixth Form admitting about 150 students each year. Following an OFSTED inspection in 2013, Carmel was graded as outstanding in all categories. It is part of the Bishop Hogarth Catholic Education Trust (formally Carmel Education Trust) which includes 18 schools in the Darlington region.The current principal is Mike Shorten.------Items used as currency of table glassIt is generally prohibited for inmates to trade items purchased on commissary. However, certain items tend to be used as currency. Cigarettes were a classic medium of exchange, but in the wake of prison tobacco bans, postage stamps have become a more common currency item, along with any inexpensive, popular item that has a round number price such as 25 or 50 cents. Ramen is also increasingly popular due to its rarity in prisons as food or trading value.------Acid drinking of table glassDuring the T20 Blind Cricket World Cup in Bangalore, India Abbasi drank a full glass of acid (phenyl) after it was given to him during breakfast on December 8, 2012. Chairman of PBCC Sultan Shah said that the glass of acid was placed on the table deliberately. The next day he was pronounced as fit to play again in next matches of the tournament..------Henrietta Watson of table glassHenrietta Watson (11 March 1873 29 September 1964) was a British actress. She was born in Dundee, Scotland, on 11 March 1873, into a theatrical family. Her maternal grandfather was actor J.B. Johnston, whom Edmund Yates considered to be the most sterling actor on the English stage. After the death of her father she went onto the stage, as did most of her four brothers and two sisters------Regular seasonFinals series of table glassLeague tableHead-to-Head resultsPositions by roundResultsFirst legAll times are Indochina Time (UTC07:00).Week 1 ChonburiWeek 2 Nakhon RatchasimaWeek 3 Nakhon RatchasimaWeek 4 BangkokWeek 5 BangkokWeek 6 Khon KaenWeek 7 Khon KaenSecond legAll times are Indochina Time (UTC07:00).Week 8 Khon KaenWeek 9 NonthaburiWeek 10 NonthaburiWeek 11 Nakhon RatchasimaWeek 12 Nakhon RatchasimaWeek 13 BangkokWeek 14 BangkokAll times are Indochina Time (UTC07:00).Final TeamVenueThe final series matches are played at the MCC Hall The Mall Bang Kapi in Bangkok.Semi-finals3rd placeFinal------Culture and Heritage of table glassReligious heritageThe Parish church of Saint-Vincent (17th century) is registered as an historical monument. It was a former Lay Abbey with the remains of a portal from the 17th century but the old church was demolished in 1880. The new Romanesque-Byzantine style church was built from 1884 to 1886.Environmental heritageThe Sommet de Souek is 623 metres highThe Soum d'Unars is 604 metresThe Barrat de Sottou is 556 metres.------James Parsons (footballer) of table glassJames Parsons (born 12 April 1997) is a professional Australian rules footballer playing for the Geelong Football Club in the Australian Football League (AFL). He was drafted by Geelong with their second selection and twenty-seventh overall in the 2016 rookie draft. He made his debut in the twenty-nine point win against Melbourne at Etihad Stadium in round three of the 2017 season.Parsons's grandfather Peter Marshall played for Victorian Football League (VFL) club Collingwood during the 1960s.------Leadership of table glassSenateLieutenant Governor Martin E. Trapp served as the President of the Senate, which gave him a tie-breaking vote and allowed him to serve as a presiding officer. R.L. Davidson was elected by state senators to serve as the President pro tempore of the Oklahoma Senate, the primary presiding officer of the Oklahoma Senate.HouseTom Waldrep served as Speaker of the Oklahoma House of Representatives.------Prison commissary of table glassA prison commissary or canteen is a store within a correctional facility, from which inmates may purchase products such as hygiene items, snacks, writing instruments, etc. Typically inmates are not allowed to possess cash; instead, they make purchases through an account with funds from money contributed by friends, family members, etc., or earned as wages. Typically, prisons set a maximum limit of funds that can be spent by each inmate on commissary.------Changes from last season of table glassTeam changesThe following teams have changed league since the 2014 season.To First LeaguePromoted from Second LeagueFC Caramba/DinamoFK Staiceles BebriFrom Higher League B team championship (dublieru empionts)JDFS AlbertsFrom First LeagueRelegated to Second LeagueFK Pavias DMPromoted to Higher LeagueFB GulbeneTo Higher League B team championship (dublieru empionts)SFK United as FB Gulbene B team------Notable Ukrainian-Americans from Baltimore of table glassJoseph H. Flom, a lawyer and pioneer of mergers and acquisitions.Jacob Glushakow, a painter known for his keen observations of life in the city of Baltimore.Philip H. Goodman, the 42nd Mayor of the City of Baltimore and a member of the Maryland Senate.Joseph Meyerhoff, a businessman, fundraiser, and philanthropist.Alexander Onischuk, a chess grandmaster.Nikolai Volkoff, a professional wrestler.Morris Zimmerman, a notable craftsman, merchant and businessman.------New Freezer of table glass"New Freezer" is a song by American rapper Rich the Kid featuring Kendrick Lamar released in 2017. The song, produced by Ben Jayne, was released as the lead single from Rich the Kid's debut album The World Is Yours. The original version featured guest vocals from ASAP Ferg and MadeinTYO. ASAP Ferg revealed in 2019 Lamar agreed to feature on thetrack on the condition that he would be only feature.------Operation of table glassSome prison commissaries are staffed by government employees and inmates, while others have been completely privatized. Significant price markups are common in prison commissaries, although some prison systems set maximum markups; for instance, the Delaware Department of Correction has a 20% maximum markup. $100 million in purchases were made from Texas' prison system alone in 2009. Prison commissary is a privilege that is often taken away for infractions.------Honours and achievements of table glassTeamAFL Premiership (Geelong): 2007, 2009, 2011McClelland Trophy (Geelong): 2007, 2008NAB Cup (Geelong): 2006 (Captain), 2009IndividualAll-Australian: 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011Carji Greeves Medal: 2003Leigh Matthews Trophy nominee: 2003, 2004, 2005, 2007Australian representative honours in International rules football: 2002, 2003Geelong F.C. Hall of Fame Inductee: 2006Geelong F.C. Life Membership Inductee: 2006Geelong F.C. Coach's Award: 2000Victorian Representative Honours in AFL Hall of Fame Tribute Match: 2008AFL Rising Star Award Nominee: 2000Victorian Country Representative Honours at the AFL Under 18 Championships: 1997Named in the TAC Cup Team of the Year: 1997 (Full-Back)------Parish structure of table glassThe church is in the Cranmer Group of parishes, which also includes St Thomas's Church, Aslockton, the Church of St Mary and All Saints, Hawksworth, St Mary's Church, Orston, the Church of St John of Beverley, Scarrington, andthe Church of St John of Beverley, Whatton. Thoroton has a service at 9 am (Holy Communion or Matins) on the second Sunday of the month.------Squads of table glassInitially, Shakib Al Hasan was ruled out of Bangladesh's squad before the start of the tournament due to injury. He was replaced by Liton Das with Mahmudullah named as captain. However, Shakib rejoined the Bangladesh squad ahead of the sixth T20I match.Sri Lanka's captain Dinesh Chandimal was given a two-match ban for a slow over-rate following the match against Bangladesh on 10 March 2018. Thisara Perera was named as Sri Lanka's captain in Chandimal's absence.------Devi Lal of table glassChaudhary Devi Lal (born Devi Dayal; 25 September 1915 6 April 2001) was an Indian politician who served as 6th Deputy Prime Minister of India from 1989 to 1991 in the governments of V. P. Singh and Chandra Shekhar. Also popularly known as Tau (uncle), Lal emerged as farmer leader from the state of Haryana, and served as the Chief Minister of Haryana first in 1977-79 and then in 1987-89.------Views and Comments of table glassCBBC has done a book club report on it by Katie Thistleton, citing part of it as a "brilliant read". People have been allowed to comment on the book report and so far there has been over 300 comments. In The Guardian newspaper review, Kat Winter has given it an 8.5 out of ten, commenting on the fact the stories were too short, she wanted to find out more.------Gunther of Bohemia of table glassGunther (Czech: Vint; German: Gnther; Hungarian: Gnter; c. 9551045) was a German (Bavarian) Catholic hermit and diplomat, who had quite important role in early history of Hungary and especially Bohemia, thanks to his good personal relationships to the rulers of those countries. In Czech, German and Hungarian settings is venerated as a saint although he never had been officially canonized.------Interior Features of table glassHeavy oak frameExposed chamfered summer beams (front room)L shaped staircasesInside the houses, a heavy oak frame and thick beams (about 24 to 36 centimetres) are used to maintain the house structure, and walls are furnished with clay and twigs to protect the houses from severe weather condition, and staircases are created in L shape to match the design of centred chimney.------Nationwide League of table glassLeague tableMatchesLegendWin See TfdDraw See TfdLoss See TfdAll attendance figures are estimates to the nearest 10.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.Ligi Ndogo awarded walkover, 2 goals and 3 points.------Works of table glassJohn Wilson Carmichael HMS Erebus and Terror in the AntarcticThomas Cole Indian Pass TawahusThomas Couture Romans of the DecadenceJean-Lon Grme The Cock FightSolomon Hart Milton Visiting Galileo when a Prisoner of the InquisitionJohn Rogers Herbert Our Saviour Subject to His Parents in NazarethEdward Hicks Penn's TreatyRobert Huskisson The Midsummer Night's FairiesCharles Lees The GolfersTheodor Sockl Clara Adelheid Soterius von SachsenheimAntoine Wiertz Deux jeunes filles (La Belle Rosine)------League table of table glassPositions by roundThe table lists the positions of teams after each week of matches. In order to preserve chronological evolvements, any postponed matches are not included to the round at which they were originally scheduled, but added to the full round they were played immediately afterwards. For example, if a match is scheduled for matchday 13, but then postponed and played between days 16 and 17, it will be added to the standings for day 17.------Accession of table glassSithu faced no opposition to the throne after his grandfather, Kyanzittha, died in 1112. He was the great grandson of Anawrahta on his mother's side. His coronation was presided by an aging Primate Shin Arahan who also presided the coronations of the two predecessor kings, and adviser to three previous kings. Upon ascending the throne, Sithu assumed the royal style Sri Tribhuwanaditya Pavarapandita Sudhammaraja Mahadhipati Narapatisithu.------Formation and boundaries of table glassThe borough was formed from four civil parishes: Charlton-next-Woolwich, Deptford St Nicholas, Greenwich and Kidbrooke. In 1901 Charlton-next-Woolwich and Kidbrooke were merged to form Charlton and Kidbrooke. In 1930 the remaining three civil parishes were combined into a single civil parish called Borough of Greenwich, which was conterminous with the metropolitan borough.Previous to the borough's formation it had been administered by two separate local bodies: Greenwich District Board of Works and Lee District Board of Works.------Impact of table glassThe April 1935 issue of the Columbia Review, Lionel Trilling wrote "Boar's Heart: 25 Years" and Mark Van Doren wrote a "Note on Poetry."In 2006, Hoffman reminisced, "When I returned to Columbia after the Second World War, I joined the Boar's Head Society, which was a little group of poets. In those days, colleges didn't like poets to do anything, so we ponied up the hundred bucks and invited him" (W. H. Auden).
Introduction to Table Glass: List of Emperors of Table Glass
List of emperors of table glassThis list includes all 47 German monarchs crowned from Charlemagne until the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire (8001806).Several rulers were crowned King of the Romans (King of Germany) but not emperor, although they styled themselves thus, among whom were: Conrad I of Germany and Henry the Fowler in the 10th century, and Conrad IV, Rudolf I, Adolf and Albert I during the interregnum of the late 13th century.Traditional historiography assumes a continuity between the Carolingian Empire and the Holy Roman Empire, while a modern convention takes the coronation of Otto I in 962 as the starting point of the Holy Roman Empire (although the term Sacrum Imperium Romanum was not in use before the 13th century).Frankish emperorsThe rulers who were crowned as Roman emperors in Western Europe between AD 800 and 915 were as follows:800888: Carolingian dynasty891898: Widonid dynasty896899: Carolingian dynasty901905: Bosonid dynasty915924: Unruoching dynastyHoly Roman EmperorsThere was no emperor in the west between 924 and 962.While earlier Germanic and Italian monarchs had been crowned as Roman emperors, the actual Holy Roman Empire is usually considered to have begun with the crowning of the Saxon king Otto I. It was officially an elective position, though at times it ran in families, notably the four generations of the Salian dynasty in the 11th century. From the end of the Salian dynasty through the middle 15th century, the emperors drew from many different German dynasties, and it was rare for the throne to pass from father to son. That changed with the ascension of the Austrian House of Habsburg, as an unbroken line of Habsburgs held the imperial throne until the 18th century. Later a cadet branch known as the House of Habsburg-Lorraine passed it from father to son until the abolition of the Empire in 1806. Notably, the Habsburgs dispensed with the requirement that emperors be crowned by the pope before exercising their office. Starting with Ferdinand I, all successive emperors forwent the traditional coronation.9621024: Ottonian dynasty10271125: Salian dynasty11331137: Supplinburg dynasty11551197: Staufen dynasty11981215: Welf dynasty12201250: Staufen dynastyThe interregnum of the Holy Roman Empire is taken to have lasted from the deposition of Frederick II by Pope Innocent IV (1245, alternatively from the death of Frederick 1250 or the death of Conrad IV 1254) to the election of Rudolf I of Germany (1273).Rudolf was not crowned emperor, nor were his successors Adolf and Albert.The next emperor was Henry VII, crowned on 29 June 1312 by Pope Clement V.13121313: House of Luxembourg13141347: House of Wittelsbach13461437: House of Luxembourg14401740: House of HabsburgIn 1508, Pope Julius II allowed Maximilian I to use the title of Emperor without coronation in Rome, though the title was qualified as Electus Romanorum Imperator ("elected Emperor of the Romans"). Maximilian's successors adopted the same titulature, usually when they became the sole ruler of the Holy Roman Empire. Maximilian's first successor Charles V was the last to be crowned Emperor by the Pope in Rome.17421745: House of Wittelsbach17451765: House of Lorraine17651806: House of Habsburg-Lorraine------Introduction of table glassAll the figures shown here have been sourced from the International Data Base (IDB) Division of the United States Census Bureau. Every individual value has been rounded to the nearest thousand, to assure data coherence, particularly when adding up (sub)totals. Although data from specific statistical offices may be more accurate, the information provided here has the advantage of being homogeneous.Population estimates, as long as they are based on recent censuses, can be more easily projected into the near future than many macroeconomic indicators, such as GDP, which are much more sensitive to political and/or economic crises. This means that demographic estimates for the next five (or even ten) years can be more accurate than the projected evolution of GDP over the same time period (which may also be distorted by inflation).However, no projected population figures can be considered exact. As the IDB states, "figures beyond the years 2020-2025 should be taken with caution", as the "census way towards those years has yet to be paved". Thus projections can be said to be looking through a kind of "cloudy glass" or a "misty window": realistically, the projections are "guesstimates".To make things complicated, not all countries carry out censuses regularly, especially some of the poorer, faster-growing sub-Saharan African nations (whose evolution may be more interesting, from a demographer's point of view, than the "stagnated" populations of countries like Germany or Italy). As is well known from the statistics, the population of many sub-Saharan nations, as well as other nations like Algeria, Bangladesh, Egypt and Pakistan, with their low family planning, are growing much faster than in the aging European nations or Japan. In general, although population growth in the former countries may slow in the future, it is unlikely that it will have stabilized by 2050, as predicted by the IDB data in some cases; they may also stay near the relatively high average level of 1.5% increase per year. Something similar can be said about China, whose population is still growing at an absolute rate of some 10 million per year, despite its government's efforts to stabilize it through its one child per couple policy.On the other hand, some other countries, like the small Asian state of Bhutan, have only recently had a thorough census for the first time: In Bhutan's case in particular, before its national 2005 population survey, the IDB estimated its population at over 2 million; this was drastically reduced when the new census results were finally included in its database.Besides, the IDB usually takes some time before including new data, as happened in the case of Indonesia. That country was reported by the IDB to have an inflated population of some 242 million by mid-2005, because it had not still processed the final results of the 2000 Indonesian census. There was a similar discrepancy with the relatively recent Ethiopian 2007 census, which gave a preliminary result of "only" 73,918,505 inhabitants.The largest absolute potential discrepancies are naturally related to the most populous nations. However, smaller states, such as Tuvalu, can have large relative discrepancies. For instance, the 2002 census in that Oceanian island, which gave a final population of 9,561 shows that IDB estimates can be significantly off.------Football career of table glassClub careerBorn in Dordrecht, van der Gijp started playing football at local side DFC. In 1975, he started playing in the Feyenoord youth academy with the likes of Hans Kraay Jr.. After a year, however, he was sent away from Feyenoord and moved to Sparta Rotterdam on the advice of Hans Kraay Sr. Two years later, van der Gijp made his debut in the first team, which counted players such as Louis van Gaal, Arie van Staveren, Luuk Balkestein, Adri van Tiggelen, Danny Blind, Ruud Geels, Ronald Lengkeek, Gerard van der Lem, Geert Meijer, Dick Advocaat and David Loggie.After four seasons, in 1982, van der Gijp left Sparta joined Lokeren in Belgium. There, he made his first European appearances in his first season. He managed to score twice in four UEFA Cup matches.After two and a half seasons, van der Gijp returned to the Netherlands in November 1984 to play for PSV. At the Eindhoven-based club, van der Gijp experienced the most successful years of his career, in which he became Dutch champions twice and scored more than forty goals. On 1 July 1987, van der Gijp left PSV, where he had played together with Ernie Brandts, Hallvar Thoresen, Glenn Hysn, Kenneth Brylle, Ruud Gullit, Frank Arnesen, Gerald Vanenburg and Ronald Koeman. His new club became the Swiss Neuchtel Xamax coached by Gilbert Gress. Club management had assumed that van der Gijp was a striker with strong heading abilities, while he had in reality never played that position. Nevertheless, Neuchtel Xamax became Swiss champions with van der Gijp in the team and also won the Swiss Super Cup twice. In Switzerland, he played another season and a half for FC Aarau, before returning to his former club Sparta.After half a season with the Rotterdam team, he played the last two years of his career for SC Heerenveen, where he retired in 1992.International careerIn 1982, van der Gijp was first called up for the Netherlands national team by then national team coach Kees Rijvers. He made his international debut on 22 September 1982, in a UEFA Euro 1984 qualifying match at home against Republic of Ireland (21). Van der Gijp thus became the second Oranje international in history whose father also played in the Dutch national team. He would eventually play fifteen international matches in which he scored two goals, both scored in a friendly against Denmark (6-0). For the Netherlands, van der Gijp played mostly together with Ruud Gullit, Hans van Breukelen, Ronald Spelbos, Frank Rijkaard, Ben Wijnstekers, Marco van Basten, Sonny Silooy, Peter Boeve, Willy van de Kerkhof and Adri van Tiggelen. Ren became the third Van der Gijp to play for the Dutch national team. Both his uncle Cor van der Gijp and his father Wim van der Gijp wore the Orange jersey. Ren van der Gijp is often referred to the fact that he has not been able to get the most out of his career. Experts believe that he could have played more international matches with his talent and perhaps could have started working for a European top club. However, he himself questions this.
Knowledge About Table Glass,Debuts of Table Glass
Debuts of table glass1 January Cathy and Elliott Lewis on Stage debuts on CBS.7 January The Crime Files of Flamond debuts on Mutual.15 January Time for Love debuted on CBS.8 February Hallmark Hall of Fame debuts on CBS.8 June Family Skeleton debuts on CBS.5 July Confession debuted on NBC.21 July The Baron and the Bee debuts on NBC.20 September The Six Shooter debuts on NBC.23 October House of Glass returns after an 18-year hiatus, this time on NBC.3 November To Be Perfectly Frank debuts on NBC.------Distribution and relationship to other units of table glassThe Southesk Formation is discontinuously present in the Canadian Rockies from Jasper National Park to the Flathead area of southeastern British Columbia. It is also present in the subsurface beneath the adjacent plains to the east. It conformably overlies the Cairn Formation or, in the Crows Nest Pass area, the Borsato Formation. At its margins it may interfinger with the Perdrix and Mount Hawk Formations. In the mountains it is unconformably overlain by the Sassenach, the Alexo or, rarely, the Palliser Formation. It is overlain by the Crowfoot Formation in the plains..------Victorian bias in the Australian Football League of table glassVictorian bias in the Australian Football League is an assertion by critics of the Australian Football League (AFL) that there is a intrinsic bias towards the Victorian based clubs of that competition. Causes of the alleged bias range from it being attributed to the fact that the AFL evolved from the Victorian Football League (VFL) resulting in a majority of the AFL's teams being located in the state of Victoria, to it being the result of intentional favouritism by the competitions administration towards Victorian clubs------Cast of table glassMarilyn Maxwell as Marion ParmaleePaulette Goddard as Betty BarnesEva Gabor as Gogo MontaineBarbara Lawrence as Marta JensenCecil Kellaway as Patrick J. 'P.J.' SullivanRobert Hutton as Charlie JohnsonLeif Erickson as Edgar BlevinsTom Conway as Maharajah of Kim-KeporeMichael Romanoff as Prince Romanoff (as Prince Michael Romanoff)Florence Bates as Mrs. Nora SullivanEl Brendel as Papa JensenLaurette Luez as Lisa JonesRobert Bice as Jack ParmaleeAram Katcher as Louis-Jean VacheronGloria Christian as Cora BlevinsByron Foulger as Ernest BoggsBibs Borman as Berta CourtallezParis Models as Himself------Coronation of table glassThe Emperor was crowned in a special ceremony, traditionally performed by the Pope in Rome. Without that coronation, no king, despite exercising all powers, could call himself Emperor. In 1508, Pope Julius II allowed Maximilian I to use the title of Emperor without coronation in Rome, though the title was qualified as Electus Romanorum Imperator ("elected Emperor of the Romans"). Maximilian's successors adopted the same titulature, usually when they became the sole ruler of the Holy Roman Empire. Maximilian's first successor Charles V was the last to be crowned Emperor------Work of table glassAbout 100 works have been attributed to the Pseudo-Simons. None of the works are signed. These works are principally fruit still lifes, and some flower still lifes and pronkstillevens (i.e. sumptuous still lifes of luxurious objects).His still lifes typically depict the same or similar objects in different combinations, such as a flower piece together with a fruit bowl and a lobster, often combined with birds or squirrels. His style and subjects show the influence of the late 17th century still life painters Jan Pauwel Gillemans the Elder and Jan Pauwel Gillemans the Younger of Antwerp.------Football career of table glassAfter playing with the Subiaco Football Club in the WAFL and leading their goalscoring in 1987 and 1988, Breman was drafted in the 1988 VFL Draft to the West Coast Eagles. Debuting with the club in 1989, he played two seasons in the VFL/AFL before being cut.After a year out of the AFL he was selected by the Richmond Football Club in 1992 before his AFL career ended after the 1993 season.Breman was widely regarded as one of the longest kickers of an Australian rules football to have played the game. In 1991, Kevin Sheedy described him as the best footballer outside of the AFL.------Kyaswa of table glassKyaswa (Burmese: , pronouncedtazw; 11981251) was king of Pagan dynasty of Burma (Myanmar) from 1235 to 1251. Kyaswa succeeded his father Htilominlo and was even more devout. Kyaswa's reign like his father's was largely peaceful but the depletion of the royal treasury due to large tax-free religious landholdings became more pronounced. The royal treasury was so depleted that Kyaswa had trouble completing a temple. The empire founded by Anawrahta over two centuries earlier was still peaceful but already on its last legs, unprepared for the internal disorders and external forces that were to come.------Selected filmography of table glassAndersson, Pettersson och Lundstrm (1923)Mlarpirater (1923)Norrtullsligan (1923)Grevarna p Svansta (1924)dets man (1924)Farbror Frans (1926)Svarte Rudolf (1928)For Her Sake (1930)Lngtan till havet (1930)Hlsingar (1933)Hon eller ingen (1934)Sngen om den eldrda blomman (1934)Intermezzo (1936)Janssons frestelse (1938)Flames in the Dark (1942)Det brinner en eld (1943)Den osynliga muren (1944)Kungajakt (1944)Galgmannen (1945)Frnskild (aka Divorced) (1951)Kvinnohuset (1953)Gabrielle (1954)Enhrningen (aka The Unicorn) (1955)Foreign Intrigue, TV series (1956)Prlemor (1961)Atelj Mia (1965)Glasmenageriet (The Glass Menagerie), TV theatre (1967)Drottningens juvelsmycke, mini series (1967)Pistolen (1973)Gangsterfilmen (1974)------Summaries of table glassResults table The contestant won photo of the week The contestant was in danger of elimination The contestant was eliminated The contestant won the competitionPhoto shoot guideEpisode 1 photo shoot: Promotional pictures in school girl outfits (casting)Episode 2 photo shoot: Urban picnic for Renault TwingoEpisode 3 photo shoot: Burlesque in a giant martini glassEpisode 4 photo shoot: 60's movement in B&WEpisode 5 photo shoot: Medieval editorialEpisode 6 photo shoot: Vampire couplesEpisode 7 music video: "Ready for me now" - Joey MoeEpisode 8 photo shoot: English upper classEpisode 9 photo shoot: Four seasons beauty shotsEpisode 10 photo shoot: Covers for COVER magazine------Public art collections of table glassValamanesh's field is contemporary art. His work is included in most major public Australian art collections, including:Alice Springs Art Centre, Alice SpringsArtbank, AustraliaArt Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaArt Gallery of South Australia, AdelaideArt Gallery of Western Australia, PerthGryphon Gallery, University of MelbourneMuseum of Contemporary Art, Australia, Sydney, AustraliaNational Gallery of Australia, Canberra, AustraliaNational Gallery of New ZealandNational Gallery of Victoria, MelbourneNewcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle, AustraliaQueensland Art Gallery, BrisbaneUniversity of South Australia, AdelaideUniversity of Western Australia, PerthUniversity of Queensland, BrisbaneWestern Australian Institute of Technology, Perth------Bells of table glassThe original bells are a ring of three by Robert Crowch, each bearing his mark and the three leopard badge of the Plantagenets. They are reported to date from 1439, in the reign of Henry VI, but the tenor was recast in 1607 by Henry Oldfield of Birmingham, and Crouch's marks have been lost.Inscriptions in English Black letter are as follows:Treble: "Sancte Xstophere ora pro nobis" St. Christopher pray for us2nd: "Nomen Magdalene gerit campana melodie" In the name of Magdalene make a joyous ring.------Logie Awards of 2006 of table glassThe 48th Annual TV Week Logie Awards was held on Sunday 7 May 2006 at the Crown Palladium in Melbourne, and broadcast on the Nine Network. The ceremony was hosted by Bert Newton, Ray Martin, Daryl Somers, Lisa McCune and Georgie Parker. The nominations were announced at the 50 Years of Television Exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney on 3 April 2006. In an historic first, the public then voted for their choice of the eight nominees (instead of five) for the Gold Logie via SMS or a 1900 number, right up until the awards night. Special guests included Chris Noth, George Eads and Joan Rivers.------Basilica Museum of table glassThe Basilica Museum is open seasonally, and is located in the Episcopal Library attached to the Archbishop's Palace. Exhibits include religious art, historic and religious artifacts of the Basilica, pictures of bishops and archbishops of St. John's, and furniture and decorations of several period rooms in the Palace. Both the Episcopal Library and Archbishop's Palace are in their own rights National Historic Sites of Canada, designated as such as buildings within the Ecclesiastical Precinct of St. John's, a National Historic District of Canada------Admissions of table glassCarmel College is the town's only Catholic secondary school. It has four main feeder schools at Primary level. These are St Teresa's RC Primary, St Bede's RC Primary, St Augustine's RC Primary and Holy Family RC Primary. There is also another school, Abbey Road Junior School, which feeds Carmel; although this school is not Catholic, it is local to Carmel. Carmel also has a sixth form.Carmel College has eight forms which consist of C, A, R, M, E, L and J, P (from former Pope John Paul II) with three houses St. Aidans, St. Bedes and St. Cuthberts.------Industry of table glassIndustrial buildings were found on the outskirts of the town, including facilities for breeding doves, olive presses, fabric dying, and glass making. Over 60 cisterns for water storage have been found throughout the excavation site as well.Pottery found at Khirbet Qana from nearby Shikhin and Kefar Hananya show that trade at Khirbet Kana would have been largely local or regional. Fields for cultivation on the west side of Khirbet Qana, along with tax records detailing taxes on crops from the 16th century serve as evidence that Khirbet Qana relied in part on agriculture.------Versailles restaurant of table glassVersailles restaurant (commonly referred to as simply Versailles), cafeteria, restaurant, and bakery, is a landmark eating establishment located on Calle Ocho (8th St) in Little Havana, Miami. The large restaurant seats 370 people and has ornate etched glass and statuettes and features a bakery, a takeout area, a counter window and the ability to host banquets and parties. Founded by Felipe A. Valls, Sr. (from Santiago de Cuba) in 1971, Versailles is a popular restaurant among local Cuban exiles and tourists for its Cuban cuisine and connection to anti-Castro politics.------Selected works of table glassThe table below provides the following information:(title of the table) including the period during which the photographs were takenYear the year the photograph was taken (this column is sortable)Subject the person(s) photographed (this column is sortable)Location the place where the photograph was taken (this column is sortable)Date the date when the photograph was taken (this column is not sortable)Page the page number where the photograph appears in the book (this column is not sortable).------Urban and metropolitan area of table glassThe Liverpool Urban Area encompasses the city of Liverpool alongside Sefton, Knowsley, Haydock and St. Helens had a population of 816,216 in 2001, which ranks seventh out of all UK conurbations. Merseyside had an estimated population of 1,347,900 in 2008 (the county of Merseyside includes the Liverpool Urban Area and the Birkenhead Urban Area, which lie to the east and west of the River Mersey respectively). The Greater Manchester Urban Area, which straddles a border with the Liverpool Urban Area, had a population of 2,240,230 in 2001, making the more or less continuous corridor of settlements between Liverpool and Manchester one of Europe's largest urban areas.------First Division of table glassThe First Division featured three new clubs in a league of 20, reduced from 21 the previous season after Wellington and Sherborne Town were promoted to the Premier Division, Backwell United resigned and Weston St Johns were relegated. Both the latter two clubs joined the Somerset County League.Odd Down, relegated from the Premier Division.Gillingham Town, promoted as runners-up in the Dorset Premier Football League.Wells City, promoted as runners-up in the Somerset County League.Portishead F.C. changed their name to Portishead Town F.C.Final table------Houses of table glassThe Causeway School has a house system in place. Each tutor is assigned a house, and the system is used for various competitions throughout the school year. The houses are as follows:All of the houses are named after famous change makers. The colours are assigned so that easier distinction between the houses can be made. The house with the most points, at the end of the school year in July wins that year's house cup. The house system is most prominent and/or noticeable and at the school Sports Day, held each year in July at Eastbourne Sports Park.
Understanding Table Glass
An overview of table glassGrainger Town is the historic heart of Newcastle upon Tyne, England.Incorporating classical streets built by Richard Grainger, a builder and developer, between 1824 and 1841, some of Newcastle's finest buildings and streets lie within the Grainger Town area of the city centre including Grainger Market, Theatre Royal, Grey Street, Grainger Street and Clayton Street. These buildings are predominantly four storeys, with vertical dormers, domes, turrets and spikes.Richard Grainger was said to 'have found Newcastle of bricks and timber and left it in stone'. Of Grainger Town's 450 buildings, 244 are listed, of which 29 are grade I and 49 are grade II*.Grainger Town covers approximately 36ha (89 acres), and the architecture is dubbed 'Tyneside Classical' architecture. One of the streets of Grainger Town, Grey Street, was described by Sir Nikolaus Pevsner as 'one of the finest streets in England'. The area also includes a mediaeval 13th-century Dominican friary, pieces of the historic Town Walls and many fine Georgian and Victorian buildings.Almost all of Grainger Town is within Newcastle's Central Conservation Area, one of the first to be designated in England. The majority of the buildings are in private ownership. The area around Grey's Monument and Grey Street is expanding fast, with high quality shopping outlets, designer fashions and jewellery. The Central Exchange, containing the Edwardian Central Arcade, is located within this area.Grainger Town project of table glassProject informationA programme of property development and environmental enhancement was started in 1993 with Newcastle City Council and the English Heritage to tackle most of the worst buildings at risk and stop the decline of the areIn 1996, Newcastle City Council, English Heritage and English Partnerships decided that the area could no longer be left to take care of itself and so EDAW[clarification needed] were commissioned to produce a regeneration strategy for Grainger Town and to prepare a bid for government funding.The proposals aimed to turn Grainger Town into a dynamic and competitive location in the heart of the city. The aim of the project was to make Grainger Town a high-quality environment appropriate to a major European regional capital. Arrangements were then put in place to make that a reality. The project was to take place over six years.The project commenced in April 1997, and by its completion in March 2003, over 174 million had been attracted into the area including 146 million from the private sector, exceeding planned 74 million by 100 million.Major achievementsUnion RoomsJD Wetherspoons, a U.K. pub chain, spent 13 months restoring the French Renaissance style of the former Union Club opposite Newcastle station. When completed, the pub was renamed The Union Rooms. As a result of the restoration, architectural features, such as a 15ft (4.6m) high stained glass window and a huge stained glass dome, were added to replace the original features that had fallen beyond repair.Bar LugaThe building was built in 1835 by Grainger for the Bank of England. The Grade II listed building was rescued from disuse and decay with the help of a grant in 1997. Following the extensive repair, Bar Luga has established itself on the ground floor, and fully let offices are on the remaining four floors.The GateLand Securities developed a new 19,235m2 (207,040sqft) retail and leisure complex, which opened in 2002. The Gate is a covered multi-level centre, with a glass faade, housing a twelve screen multiplex cinema, a sky bar with views over the city, a variety of restaurants and a casino.Other achievements1506 jobs created as well as a further 800 in Grainger Town from the increased confidence in the area.286 new businesses set up.80,900m2 (871,000sqft) of new and/or improved commercial floorspace.121 buildings, many of them listed properties and classified as 'buildings at risk', restored for use.Grey's Monument repaired and cleaned.289 flats and apartments completed with many located within the Grainger Street and Clayton Street areas.Westgate House, which was an eleven-storey office block, perhaps Newcastle's most unpopular building, was acquired by ONE North East and demolished between late 2006 and early 2007.Decay of table glassIn the 1960s and 1970s, parts of Grainger Town, amounting to around a quarter of Grainger's original scheme, were demolished to make way for projects such as Eldon Square Shopping Centre. In the 1980s and early 1990s, the once-prosperous area of the city was overtaken by new centres of retail and commercial activity.In the early 1990s, Richard Grainger's legacy was in poor shape, as shops and offices moved out to other locations. The residential population of the area was falling rapidly to 1,200 and showed no signs of improvement. Around 100,000m2 (1.1million square feet) of floor space were vacant, and the area exhibited all the classic symptoms of urban decay. There were calls for clearance of listed properties and whole streets. Structural problems became evident, with 47% of its 244 listed buildings classed as being 'at risk' and a further 29% classified as vulnerable. The area was now in the realms of a very poor environment and so investor confidence was low.
Know About Table Glass - an Introduction to Table Glass
An Introduction to table glassSt. Paul's Episcopal Church is an Episcopal parish church located in Evansville, Indiana, within the Episcopal Diocese of Indianapolis. The parish was formally organized in 1836 after a missionary visit from Bishop Jackson Kemper. The present-day church building was erected in 1886 on the corner of 1st and Chestnut St. in downtown Evansville to replace the parish's first church built on the same site. Designed by architects James W. Reid & Merritt J. Reid, the English Gothic Revival-style structure was constructed with Bedford limestone and trimmed with Green River limestone. St. Paul's is known for being the home parish of various prominent figures in Evansville's history. It is also known for its community service, including a weekend soup kitchen through Sr. Joanna's Table.St. Paul's Episcopal Church was added to the National Register of Historic Places on July 17, 1978 as part of the larger Riverside Historic District in downtown Evansville.Worship services of table glassSunday worship services: 8 a.m. (Rite I), 10:30a.m. (Rite II with sung choral)Weekday worship services: Eucharist at noonHistory of table glassEvansville's first Episcopalians organized themselves as St. Paul's parish, the first Protestant Episcopal parish in Evansville on January 9, 1836. Rev. Archibald H. Lamon served as the first rector from 1836-1844. The congregation met in the first Vanderburgh County Courthouse until January 12, 1840, when the first church building on 1st and Chestnut was consecrated by Bishop Jackson Kemper.:3 After Rev. Lamon left the congregation in March 1844 to pursue missionary work in Louisiana, the congregation went through a series of rectors as follows:Rev. B.H. Hicox (invited 1844, died before assuming duties)Rev. William Vaux (1844-1845, educated in England, brought to America by Bishop Kemper, left to become US army chaplain on the western frontier)Rev. N.A. Okeson (1845-1846)Rev. Colley A. Foster (1847-1856)Rev. Anthony Ten Broeck (1856-1857)Rev. Sidney Wilbur (1857-1859)Rev. Elias Birdsall (1860-1864, left to become the first rector of St. Athanasius Episcopal Church in Los Angeles, the first Protestant Episcopal parish in Southern California)Rev. H.W. Spaulding (1865-1867)Rev. W.H. Van Antwerp (1868-1874)Rev. W.N. Webbe (1874-1879)Rev. Theodore I. Holcombe (1880-1881)Rev. Charles Morris (1881-1894)Under the leadership of Rev. Morris, St. Paul's Episcopal parish vestry passed a resolution to build a new church building. The final service in the first church building was held on April 15, 1883. While construction ensued, a congregant and frequent benefactor, Charles Viele, offered the use of Viele Hall (located on 2nd street between Main and Sycamore streets) to St. Paul's parish. The cornerstone for new St. Paul's was laid on September 3, 1883, and construction completed on March 2, 1886 with Bishop D.B. Knickerbacker consecrating the new building. Charles and Mary Viele continued to sponsor further construction on the church grounds - first with a rectory (1886) and later a chapel named in honor of the Viele family (1887).:39The next series of rectors were as follows:Rev. W. Northey Jones (1894-1897)Rev. Joseph Marshall Francis (1897-1899, later became Bishop of Diocese of Indianapolis)Rev. Dr. John Davis (1899-1904, a former theology teacher at an Episcopal mission in Japan)Rev. William Reid Cross (1904-1911)Rev. John Boden (1911-1913)Rev. Horace Weeks Jones (1914, died in an automobile accident)Rev. A.L. Murray (1914-1918)Rev. W.R. Plummer (1918-1923, died during mid-week service in Viele chapel of heart attack)Rev. E. Ainger Powell (1923-1931), later became rector of Christ Church Cathedral in IndianapolisRev. Joseph G. Moore (1932-1943)Rev. Moore served as a dynamic leader not only at St. Paul's but also in the broader Southwestern Indiana community. During the Great Depression when nearby Episcopal churches could not afford full-time clergy, he made time to visit these parishes for services to keep them open. He formed a cadre of laypeople assist him in these services, which became known as the Evansville Associate Mission of Southwestern Indiana.:71 Rev. Moore also was a strong advocate for civil rights causes. He held the position of National Field Secretary for the Church League for Industrial Democracy, which brought him into contact with activists AJ Muste & Claude C Williams, Leon Trotsky's bodyguard Henry Schnautz, and other socialists of the 1930s. Rev. Moore supported local labor unions and condemned corrupt local elections through the League for Clean Elections.Rev. Moore also played a significant role in creating better race relations in Evansville. During World War II, Rev. Moore & the vestry invited a group of black workers in the Civilian Conservation Corps & their African-American Episcopalian chaplain to worship at St. Paul's on Sundays - the first documented integrated church service in Evansville. This action was taken despite the bishop's opposition to a previously integrated mid-week service. In addition, Rev. Moore brought future Supreme Court justice Thurgood Marshall to Evansville for help in creating a local chapter of the NAACP.:79In 1937, Evansville experienced a severe flood which severely damaged the interior of St. Paul's. The flood damage later contributed to the shorting out of wiring connected to the organ, causing a massive fire on March 27, 1938.:75 Between the flood and the fire, the interior was gutted and remodeled while the exterior stonework remained.After Rev. Moore left to become a US army chaplain in February 1943, Rev. Imri Blackburn became rector and served until February 14, 1954 when he resigned to accept a professorship at Seabury Western Seminary. The next series of rectors followed:Rev. W. Robert Webb (1954-1971)Rev. Richard Wyatt (1972-1978)Rev. Thomas N. Sandy (1978-1985)Rev. Henry Doherty (1985-1987)Rev. James B. Hempstead (1990-1998)Rev. Shane Scott-Hamblen (1999-2002)Rev. J. Raymond Lord (2002-2003)Rev. Richard R. Godbold (2003-2016)In 2017, St. Paul's vestry invited Rev. Holly Rankin Zaher to be the first female rector of the parish.Notable peopleCharles Harvey DenbyEdwin Denby (politician)Charles Denby Jr.Gordon Granger, married his wife Maria at St. Paul's in 1869
Knowledge About Table Glass - Numbers of Table Glass
Numbers of table glassAccording to OECD 2013 data, in the period 2000-2011, public expenditure on health has risen from 3.9% of the GDP in 2000 through 4.3% in 2004 to 5.0% in 2010; public social expenditure has remained relatively stable (20.5% of the GDP in 2000, 21.4% in 2004 and 20.7% in 2011), and public pension expenditure has also remained relatively stable with 11.4% of the GDP in 2005 and 11.8% in 2009.According to a 2011 report by the Ministry of Labour and Social Policy, in 2010 Polish government social expenditures in 2010 were 96 billion zloties, or 32.5% of the total Polish government budget. This formed 39% of the total social expenditures in Poland, which totaled 245 billion zloties. According to that report, social expenditure in Poland totaled 17.3% of GDP in 2010, of which the government covered 6,8%.------Kyaswa of table glassKyaswa (Burmese: , pronouncedtazw; 11981251) was king of Pagan dynasty of Burma (Myanmar) from 1235 to 1251. Kyaswa succeeded his father Htilominlo and was even more devout. Kyaswa's reign like his father's was largely peaceful but the depletion of the royal treasury due to large tax-free religious landholdings became more pronounced. The royal treasury was so depleted that Kyaswa had trouble completing a temple. The empire founded by Anawrahta over two centuries earlier was still peaceful but already on its last legs, unprepared for the internal disorders and external forces that were to come.------ShipsSimilar ships of table glassSpirit class - a similar class of Panamax ships operated by Carnival Cruise Lines and Costa Cruises.MVArcadia - a similar Panamax ship operated by P&O Cruises.MSQueen Victoria - a similar Panamax sized ship operated by Cunard Line.Vista class - a similar class of Panamax ships operated by Holland America LineSignature-class cruise ship - a similar class of Panamax ships operated by Holland America LineCoral Princess and Island Princess - A similar set of Panamax ships operated by Princess CruisesCosta Luminosa and Costa Deliziosa - A set of Panamax ships operated by Costa Cruises derived from the Spirit and Vista-class designs.------Work of table glassAbout 100 works have been attributed to the Pseudo-Simons. None of the works are signed. These works are principally fruit still lifes, and some flower still lifes and pronkstillevens (i.e. sumptuous still lifes of luxurious objects).His still lifes typically depict the same or similar objects in different combinations, such as a flower piece together with a fruit bowl and a lobster, often combined with birds or squirrels. His style and subjects show the influence of the late 17th century still life painters Jan Pauwel Gillemans the Elder and Jan Pauwel Gillemans the Younger of Antwerp.------Written records of table glassHistorical accounts of Ruwayda are scarce, with only two accounts being known. The first is a manuscript dating to the 1800s called Lam al-Shihab, which, according to Kuwaiti writer and historian Abu Hakima, refers to Ruwayda as being among the towns which were raided by the Wahhabis of Nejd in 1790. John Gordon Lorimer's 1908 encyclopedia Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf, Oman and Central Arabia is the other source which makes mention of Ruwayda, describing it as an abandoned village located 3 miles north of Al Khuwayr. He reported that, according to local sources, it was deserted around the 1760s when its inhabitants migrated to the newly founded town of Zubarah.------Houses of table glassThe Causeway School has a house system in place. Each tutor is assigned a house, and the system is used for various competitions throughout the school year. The houses are as follows:All of the houses are named after famous change makers. The colours are assigned so that easier distinction between the houses can be made. The house with the most points, at the end of the school year in July wins that year's house cup. The house system is most prominent and/or noticeable and at the school Sports Day, held each year in July at Eastbourne Sports Park.------Public art collections of table glassValamanesh's field is contemporary art. His work is included in most major public Australian art collections, including:Alice Springs Art Centre, Alice SpringsArtbank, AustraliaArt Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaArt Gallery of South Australia, AdelaideArt Gallery of Western Australia, PerthGryphon Gallery, University of MelbourneMuseum of Contemporary Art, Australia, Sydney, AustraliaNational Gallery of Australia, Canberra, AustraliaNational Gallery of New ZealandNational Gallery of Victoria, MelbourneNewcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle, AustraliaQueensland Art Gallery, BrisbaneUniversity of South Australia, AdelaideUniversity of Western Australia, PerthUniversity of Queensland, BrisbaneWestern Australian Institute of Technology, Perth------Method Translation of table glassFaster GC methods have shorter times but Kovats indexes of the compounds may be conserved if proper method translation is applied.Temperatures of the temperature program stay the same, but ramps and times change when using a smaller column or faster carrier gas.If column dimensions Lengthdiameterfilm are divided by 2 and gas velocity is doubled by using H2 in place of He, the hold times must be divided by 4 and the ramps must be multiplied by 4 to keep the same index and the same retention temperature for the same compound analyzed. Method translation rules are incorporated in some chromatography data systems.------Nelles Peak of table glassNelles Peak is a remote 2,531-metre (8,304-foot) mountain summit located in the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. It is situated at the northeastern periphery of the Juneau Icefield, 5.0km (3.1mi) inside the BC-Alaska boundary, on the west side of Tulsequah Lake. Its nearest higher peak is Devils Paw, 9.0km (5.6mi) to the southeast. Nelles Peak is the second-highest summit of the icefield, after Devils Paw. The mountain was named in 1924 to honor Douglas H. Nelles (18811960), a Canadian engineer who participated with the International Boundary Survey party of 1907. The mountain's name was officially adopted in 1947 when approved by the Geographical Names Board of Canada.------Admissions of table glassCarmel College is the town's only Catholic secondary school. It has four main feeder schools at Primary level. These are St Teresa's RC Primary, St Bede's RC Primary, St Augustine's RC Primary and Holy Family RC Primary. There is also another school, Abbey Road Junior School, which feeds Carmel; although this school is not Catholic, it is local to Carmel. Carmel also has a sixth form.Carmel College has eight forms which consist of C, A, R, M, E, L and J, P (from former Pope John Paul II) with three houses St. Aidans, St. Bedes and St. Cuthberts.------Summaries of table glassResults table The contestant won photo of the week The contestant was in danger of elimination The contestant was eliminated The contestant won the competitionPhoto shoot guideEpisode 1 photo shoot: Promotional pictures in school girl outfits (casting)Episode 2 photo shoot: Urban picnic for Renault TwingoEpisode 3 photo shoot: Burlesque in a giant martini glassEpisode 4 photo shoot: 60's movement in B&WEpisode 5 photo shoot: Medieval editorialEpisode 6 photo shoot: Vampire couplesEpisode 7 music video: "Ready for me now" - Joey MoeEpisode 8 photo shoot: English upper classEpisode 9 photo shoot: Four seasons beauty shotsEpisode 10 photo shoot: Covers for COVER magazine------Football career of table glassAfter playing with the Subiaco Football Club in the WAFL and leading their goalscoring in 1987 and 1988, Breman was drafted in the 1988 VFL Draft to the West Coast Eagles. Debuting with the club in 1989, he played two seasons in the VFL/AFL before being cut.After a year out of the AFL he was selected by the Richmond Football Club in 1992 before his AFL career ended after the 1993 season.Breman was widely regarded as one of the longest kickers of an Australian rules football to have played the game. In 1991, Kevin Sheedy described him as the best footballer outside of the AFL.------Early life and junior football of table glassJoyce was born in Melbourne but moved to Tweed Heads on the Queensland-New South Wales border at the age of 2. He first played junior football on the Gold Coast for the Coolangatta Tweed Heads Australian Football Club before switching to the Palm Beach Currumbin Australian Football Club and making his senior debut at the age of 16. He also attended Palm Beach Currumbin High School in his teenage years and graduated with future Suns teammate Max Spencer.He joined the Gold Coast Suns' academy at the age of 14 and was drafted to his hometown team with the 67th pick in the 2016 AFL rookie draft.------List of North West Warriors grounds of table glassNorth West Warriors cricket team were established in 2013, and accorded first-class status in 2017, playing in the Irish Inter-Provincial Championship. Since then, they have played first-class, List A and Twenty20 cricket at a number of different home grounds. Their first home first-class match was against Northern Knights in 2017 at Woodvale Road in Eglinton, County Londonderry.As of 4 September 2018, North West Warriors have played four home first-class matches, four List A matches, and five Twenty20 matches at three different home grounds. The three grounds that North West Warriors have used for home matches are listed below, with statistics complete through the end of the 2018 season.------MGM Springfield of table glassMGM Springfield is a hotel and casino complex situated in the heart of Metro Center, Springfield, Massachusetts, United States. Opening on August 24, 2018 in a block of buildings that are historically or culturally influential to Springfield, it became the first resort casino in the Commonwealth. It is owned and operated by MGM Resorts International. MGM Springfield opened its doors to the public on August 24, 2018. It was then temporarily closed on March 14, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It reopened to the public on July 13, 2020, after nearly 4 months of being closed, with safety precautions and reduced capacity in place. Chris Kelly is the current President an COO of MGM Springfield------Paradise (E-Type & Nana Hedin song) of table glass"Paradise" is a song written by E-Type and Mud and performed by E-Type with Nana Hedin during Melodifestivalen 2004. Participating in the second semifinal in Gothenburg, it made it to the finals inside the Stockholm Globe Arena, where it ended up 5th.Released as a single, it also appeared on the album Loud Pipes Save Lives. It peaked at 2nd position at the Swedish singles chart.It also charted at Svensktoppen, for three weeks between 11 April 2004 and 25 April 2004, peaking at 5th position before leaving the chart.During Melodifestivalen, Motrhead's drummer Mikkey Dee appeared with E-Type. He also appears in the song video.------Logie Awards of 2006 of table glassThe 48th Annual TV Week Logie Awards was held on Sunday 7 May 2006 at the Crown Palladium in Melbourne, and broadcast on the Nine Network. The ceremony was hosted by Bert Newton, Ray Martin, Daryl Somers, Lisa McCune and Georgie Parker. The nominations were announced at the 50 Years of Television Exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney on 3 April 2006. In an historic first, the public then voted for their choice of the eight nominees (instead of five) for the Gold Logie via SMS or a 1900 number, right up until the awards night. Special guests included Chris Noth, George Eads and Joan Rivers.------Urban and metropolitan area of table glassThe Liverpool Urban Area encompasses the city of Liverpool alongside Sefton, Knowsley, Haydock and St. Helens had a population of 816,216 in 2001, which ranks seventh out of all UK conurbations. Merseyside had an estimated population of 1,347,900 in 2008 (the county of Merseyside includes the Liverpool Urban Area and the Birkenhead Urban Area, which lie to the east and west of the River Mersey respectively). The Greater Manchester Urban Area, which straddles a border with the Liverpool Urban Area, had a population of 2,240,230 in 2001, making the more or less continuous corridor of settlements between Liverpool and Manchester one of Europe's largest urban areas.------Cast of table glassMarilyn Maxwell as Marion ParmaleePaulette Goddard as Betty BarnesEva Gabor as Gogo MontaineBarbara Lawrence as Marta JensenCecil Kellaway as Patrick J. 'P.J.' SullivanRobert Hutton as Charlie JohnsonLeif Erickson as Edgar BlevinsTom Conway as Maharajah of Kim-KeporeMichael Romanoff as Prince Romanoff (as Prince Michael Romanoff)Florence Bates as Mrs. Nora SullivanEl Brendel as Papa JensenLaurette Luez as Lisa JonesRobert Bice as Jack ParmaleeAram Katcher as Louis-Jean VacheronGloria Christian as Cora BlevinsByron Foulger as Ernest BoggsBibs Borman as Berta CourtallezParis Models as Himself
Introduction to Table Glass,Life in the Northern Territory of Table Glass
Life in the Northern Territory of table glassRyan and her husband moved to the Northern Territory from Adelaide in 1873 after hearing reports of gold discoveries in the north. She arrived in Darwin, then known as Palmerston, on board the Birchgrove just three years after the town was established by George Goyder. The couple travelled straight to the gold fields near Pine Creek with hundreds of other prospectors. Upon realising that 'liquid gold' was also a lucrative opportunity, the Ryans leased the Miners' Arms Hotel. Over the next 15 years, Ryan earned the reputation of keeping the "best table out of Darwin".Ryan separated from her husband in 1877 taking out a formal protection order against him in 1881 for her earnings, "owing to his threats,cruelty and drunkenness". She granted him 50 and he left Palmerston shortly after stating he had "had quite enough of the Territory and the people in it".After the divorce, Ryan consolidated her holdings, buying up land in Palmerston and taking on several mining leases. As the economy cooled, Ryan decided to build a hotel in 1888. Her plans were stalled after sustaining a serious injury falling from her horse, which kicked her in the head. But two years later she succeeded in building a prestigious two-storey hotel in Palmerston which was first named the Royal, but was changed to the North Australian at the last minute. It was eventually named the Victoria Hotel. It opened in 1890 to wide acclaim:"It only remains to be said that the interior arrangements are of the very best the furnishings of the bedrooms and parlours are both elaborate and tasteful."She was a sporting enthusiast and owned several racehorses, securing much business for her hotel. She was known to take unpopular position on issues in the town, such as campaigning against the restriction of Chinese immigrants. She had depended on Chinese labour for the construction of and domestic work in her hotel.Also in 1890, Ryan also applied for a lease to run the Union Hotel, at a mining lease called the Union, in the same year.In 1896 Ryan relinquished her lease on the North Australian taking out one instead on the nearby Club Hotel, located on the site of the Hotel Darwin. Both pubs were severely damaged in the 1897 cyclone the following year.Ryan took up the management of the North Australia Hotel, known at this stage as the Victoria Hotel, again in 1901, returning the hotel to the centre of social life in Darwin by establishing a dressmaker adjacent to the hotel and through the hosting of motor launches. The Victoria Hotel was taken under Federal control in 1915, after the Northern Territory separated from South Australia and was transferred to the Commonwealth, in an attempt to control alcohol consumption in the town.------Site of table glassFortBy far the most visible structure of the site is its centrally-placed fort. The fort is square in shape and has a rounded tower. It has two complexes and an outer wall covering an area of 2.25 hectares. The joint QMA-University of Wales Trinity Saint David Archaeological Mission ascribed three phases of construction to the fort. Phase 1 marked the fort's original construction. It was likely deserted for a brief period of time before phase 2 witnessed the reconstruction of the fort, marking the peak of the fort's area. In phase 3, the fort was significantly downgraded.A residential quarter, a garden, two wells and a section containing the remains of what was likely an animal pen are found in the two complexes. Some of these features were added in phase 2.Dating back to the 16th century, there is debate over who constructed the fort, with the two main contenders being the Portuguese and the Ottomans. Construction methods of the fort appear to resemble Portuguese forts at the time, bearing little resemblance to Ottoman forts. Archaeologist Andrew Petersen, who was a key figure in the excavation team from 2011 to 2014, speculated that it was the Portuguese who were responsible for building the fort. Petersen alluded to the lavish and grandiose scale of the fort, pointing out its functional limitations which were not present in Ottoman forts of that period. He also hypothesized that, after being abandoned by the Portuguese, it was rediscovered by Kuwaiti Bedouin tribes in the 1700s who refurbished the fort to protect them from attacks.MosquesSituated on the seafront north of the fort is a mosque, which was uncovered from 2011 to 2013. This mosque is thought to have been built in the 1700s. Another structure west of the fort that is yet to be excavated is also purported to be a mosque.WarehouseA structure dubbed the warehouse comprises eight adjacent rooms. Few artifacts were recovered from the premises, although a date press (madbasa) was uncovered.TombRoughly 500 meters eastward from the fort is a tomb. Originally, the site accommodated a midden, but this midden was eventually converted into a raised entrance once a small rectangular building was built next to it. Structural evidence indicates that it is likely this building did not have a roof. It is not known who was buried in the tomb.WorkshopLarge quantities of bitumen, pottery, glass, metalwork and marine shells have been found in an excavated structure known as the workshop. A tentative description of this structure offered by the joint QMA-University of Wales Trinity Saint David team is that it previously served as a boat repair shop.------Rivers on Scottish islands of table glassMost of the Scottish islands are too small to maintain watercourses of any great length or size, and are frequently indented by numerous long bays and inlets which further break up the landscape. However a disproportionate number of their watercourses bear the name 'river', though many are relatively tiny.ArranThe numerous small watercourses on Arran are listed anticlockwise from Brodick.Glencloy WaterGlenrosa WaterSouth Sannox BurnNorth Sannox BurnAbhainn MrIorsa WaterMachrie WaterBlack Water (upper reaches known as Clauchan Water)Sliddery WaterTorrylinn Water (also known as Kilmory Water)Benlister BurnGlenashdale Burn (a.k.a. Allt Delphin)Skye and the Inner HebridesIslayThere are numerous watercourses on Islay, many of which though short are termed 'rivers'. They are listed anticlockwise from Port Askaig.Doodilmore RiverGortanaoid RiverSaligo RiverRiver DrolsayRiver SornRiver LagganDuich River (L) (upper reaches known as Torra River)Kilennan River (L)Barr RiverMachrie RiverGlenegedale River (L)Kintra RiverKilbride RiverArdilistry RiverKintour RiverClaggain RiverJuraThere are numerous watercourses on Jura, some of which though short are termed 'rivers'. They are listed anticlockwise from Feolin Ferry.Corran RiverLussan RiverShian RiverGlenbatrick RiverMullThere are numerous watercourses on Mull, some of which though short are termed 'rivers'.They are listed anticlockwise from Tobermory.Tobermory RiverRiver BellartRiver B (Glencannel River flows into Loch B)Scarisdale RiverColadoir RiverLeidle RiverBeach RiverLussa RiverScallastle RiverRiver ForsaAros RiverLedmore River (Ls)Allt an Lon Biolaireich (Rs)RmThere are a number of watercourses on Rm, some of which are named as 'rivers'. They are listed anticlockwise from Kinloch.Kinloch RiverKilmory RiverAbhainn RangailDibidil RiverIsle of SkyeListed anticlockwise around the coast from Kyleakin. Many small watercourses, which would in other areas be named as 'burn' or 'allt', bear the name 'river' in Skye.Broadford RiverRiver SligachanAllt Dearg MrVarragill RiverRiver LeasgearyRiver ChracaigLealt RiverStenscholl River (upper reaches known as Kilmartin River)River BrogaigKilmaluag RiverRiver RhaRiver CononRiver HinnisdalRiver RomesdalRiver HaultinRiver SnizortLn an Eireannaich (R)Abhainn an Acha-leathainTungadal RiverRiver ToraTreaslane RiverBay RiverRiver HornevalOsdale RiverHamara RiverLorgill RiverDibidal RiverRoskhill RiverCaroy RiverRiver OseAmar RiverSumardale RiverRiver DrynochViskigill BurnRiver TaliskerEynort RiverRiver BrittleScavaig RiverAbhainn Camas FhionnairighOrd RiverKylerhea RiverOuter HebridesLewisAbhainn GhriaisAbhainn LacasdailAbhainn Ghrioda (Greeta River or River Creed)Abhainn ArnoilAbhainn BharabhaisOrkneyMainlandBurn of AyrelandMill Dam Burn, Shapinsay, Orkney IslandsShetlandMainlandBurn of WeisdaleBurn of Sandwater/Burn of Pettawater------Salamanders (Caudata) of table glassPlethodontidaeOrder: Caudata.Family: PlethodontidaeThe Plethodontidae, or lungless salamanders, are a family of salamanders. Most species are native to the Western Hemisphere, from British Columbia to Brazil, although a few species are found in Sardinia, Europe south of the Alps, and South Korea.A number of features distinguish the Plethodontids from other salamanders. Most significantly, they lack lungs, conducting respiration through their skin, and the tissues lining their mouths. Another distinctive feature is the presence of a vertical slit between the nostril and upper lip, known as the "naso-labial groove". The groove is lined with glands, and enhances the salamander's chemoreception. Due to their modest size and low metabolism, they are able to feed on prey such as collembola, which are usually too small for other terrestrial vertebrates. This gives them access to a whole ecological niche with minimal competition from other groups. They are by far the largest group of salamanders. There are about 380 species worldwide, of which 41 occur in Guatemala.Oak forest salamander Bolitoglossa cuchumatana (Stuart, 1943) EDoflein's salamander Bolitoglossa dofleini (Werner, 1903)Dunn's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa dunni (Schmidt, 1933) ENEngelhardt's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa engelhardti (Schmidt, 1936) ENYellow-legged climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flavimembris (Schmidt, 1936) ENYellow-belly climbing salamander Bolitoglossa flaviventris (Schmidt, 1936)Franklin's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa franklini (Schmidt, 1936) ENHartweg's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa hartwegi Wake & Brame, 1969Coban climbing salamander Bolitoglossa helmrichi (Schmidt, 1936) EJackson's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa jacksoni Elias, 1984 ELincoln's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa lincolni (Stuart, 1943)Meliana climbing salamander Bolitoglossa meliana Wake & Lynch, 1982 E, ENMexican climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mexicana Dumril, Bibron & Dumril, 1854Cope's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa morio (Cope, 1869) EMuller's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa mulleri (Brocchi, 1883) VUSouthern banana salamander Bolitoglossa occidentalis Taylor, 1941O'Donnell's climbing salamander Bolitoglossa odonnelli (Stuart, 1943) ENBolitoglossa resplendens McCoy & Walker, 1966Long-nosed climbing salamander Bolitoglossa rostrata (Brocchi, 1883) VUNorthern banana salamander Bolitoglossa rufescens (Cope, 1869)Salvin's salamander Bolitoglossa salvinii (Gray, 1868) ENStuart's salamander Bolitoglossa stuarti Wake & Brame, 1969 ENYucatan salamander Bolitoglossa yucatana (Peters, 1882)Finca Chiblac salamander Bradytriton silus Wake & Elias, 1983 E, CRMonzon's hidden salamander Cryptotriton monzoni (Campbell & Smith, 1998) E, CRBaja Verapaz salamander Cryptotriton veraepacis (Lynch & Wake, 1978) E, ENWake's hidden salamander Cryptotriton wakei (Campbell & Smith, 1998)Common bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton bromeliacius (Schmidt, 1936) ENCuchumatanes bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton cuchumatanus (Lynch & Wake, 1975) E, CRGuatemalan bromeliad salamander Dendrotriton rabbi (Lynch & Wake, 1975) ENCerro Pozo de Agua moss salamander Nototriton brodiei Campbell & Smith, 1998Stuart's moss salamander Nototriton stuarti Wake & Campbell, 2000 ELong-limbed salamander Nyctanolis pernix Elias & Wake, 1983 ENWhite-crowned worm salamander Oedipina elongata (Schmidt, 1936)Chimaltenango worm salamander Oedipina ignea Stuart, 1952Narrow-footed worm salamander Oedipina stenopodia Brodie & Campbell, 1993 E, ENTaylor's worm salamander Oedipina taylori Stuart, 1952Brown false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea brunnata Bumzahem & Smith, 1955 CRJalpa false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea exspectata Stuart, 1954 E, CRGoebel's false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea goebeli (Schmidt, 1936) ENRoyal false brook salamander Pseudoeurycea rex (Dunn, 1921)
Knowledge About Table Glass | Biblical Cana of Table Glass
Biblical Cana of table glassKhirbet Qana (grid: 178/247) is one of the locations in Galilee that researchers consider as a possibility for the biblical town of Cana, where Jesus turned water into wine at the Wedding at Cana. Crusader maps have been cited as evidence identifying Khirbet Qana with the biblical Cana. The writings of Burchard of Mount Sion have also linked Khirbet Qana with Cana. By the medieval period, texts from Christian pilgrims reveal Khirbet Qana was associated with the biblical Cana during that period, including the account of the English merchant Saewulf in the 12th century.In the 17th century, Francisco Quaresimus concluded that Kafr Kanna was the biblical Cana, as it had a church, while Khirbet Qana did not. However, the fact that the main road from Sepphoris to Tiberias passed Kafr Kanna rather than Khirbet Qana, may have been a factor in this decision. Historical geographer, Samuel Klein, also thought that the ancient Cana was to be identified with the Arab village of Kafr Kanna, but that the nearby ruin of Khirbet Qana (which bears the same name) was actually a different village, which Klein thought to be Kefar 'Aris (Heb. ) mentioned in the Tosefta (Kelim Baba-Metsia 11:2), and said to be mentioned by Josephus in The Jewish War under the name Garis, a town situated not far from Sepphoris. The Greek word used in this toponym is Greek: , the Gamma said to be of the same ancient usage as found in Greek transcriptions of Gaza and Gabara . The ruin is situated about 4 kilometres (2.5mi) east of Sepphoris. Today, scholars are again focusing on Khirbet Qana as the site for the biblical Cana.------Family and children of table glassRudolf was married twice. First, in 1251, to Gertrude of Hohenberg and second, in 1284, to Isabelle of Burgundy, daughter of Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy. All children were from the first marriage.Matilda (c. 1253, Rheinfelden 23 December 1304, Munich), married 1273 in Aachen to Louis II, Duke of Bavaria and became mother of Rudolf I, Count Palatine of the Rhine and Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor.Albert I of Germany (July 1255 1 May 1308), Duke of Austria and also of Styria.Catherine (1256 4 April 1282, Landshut), married 1279 in Vienna to Otto III, Duke of Bavaria who later (after her death) became the disputed King Bela V of Hungary and left no surviving issue.Agnes Gertrude (ca. 1257 11 October 1322, Wittenberg), married 1273 to Albert II, Duke of Saxony and became the mother of Rudolf I, Duke of Saxe-Wittenberg.Hedwig (c. 1259 26 January 1285/27 October 1286), married 1270 in Vienna to Otto VI, Margrave of Brandenburg-Salzwedel and left no issue.Clementia (c. 1262 after 7 February 1293), married 1281 in Vienna to Charles Martel of Anjou, the Papal claimant to the throne of HungaryHartmann (1263, Rheinfelden 21 December 1281), drowned in Rheinau.Rudolf II, Duke of Austria and Styria (1270 10 May 1290, Prague), titular Duke of Swabia, father of John the Parricide of Austria.Judith of Habsburg (Jutte/Bona) (13 March 1271 18 June 1297, Prague), married 24 January 1285 to King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia and became the mother of king Wenceslaus III of Bohemia, Poland and Hungary, of queen Anne of Bohemia (12901313), duchess of Carinthia, and of queen Elisabeth of Bohemia (12921330), countess of Luxembourg.Samson (before 19 Oct 1275 died young).Charles (14 February 1276 16 August 1276).Rudolf's last legitimate agnatic descendant was Maria Theresa, Holy Roman Empress (17171780), by Albert I of Germany's fourth son Albert II, Duke of Austria.------Mastos of table glassA mastos (Greek, , "breast"; plural mastoi) is an ancient Greek drinking vessel shaped like a woman's breast. The type is also called a parabolic cup, and has parallel examples made of glass or silver. Examples are primarily in black-figure or white ground technique, though early examples may be red-figure. A mastos typically has two handles and a "nipple" at the bottom, though some examples have a foot as a base instead. A mastoid cup is conical, but with a flat bottom, with or without handles.The handles of a mastos may be paired horizontally, but they may also be arranged with one horizontal, and one vertical like the handle of a mug. The vertical handle would have facilitated drinking from the relatively deep vessel, in contrast to the more shallow kylix. Having one handle turned at a different angle may also have been a device for hanging the cup when it had the pointed base.In some archaeological contexts, the breast-like shape of the cup suggests ritual functions. Mastoi and votive representations of breasts are found as offerings (vota) at sanctuaries of deities such as Diana and Hercules, both of whom in ancient Roman religion had functions pertaining to birth, nursing, and rearing children. The dedications were sometimes made by wet nurses. The breast-shaped cup may have a religious significance; the drinking of breast milk by an adult who is elderly or about to die symbolized potential rebirth in the afterlife. In the Etruscan tradition, the goddess Juno (Uni) offers her breast to Hercules as a sign that he may enter the ranks of the immortals.------ClimateAttractions of table glassBasilica of Our Lady of PiatThis site is visited by Roman Catholic pilgrims and is believed to exhibit miracles. The Basilica Minore of Our Lady of Piat is one of only 13 minor basilicas in the Philippines. It is distinguished as the home of the venerated Black Virgin Mary. The interior contains curved ceilings made of wood with historical images and accounts along the tops of the walls. Verandas inside the church add to the shrine's elegance. On the altar lies the Blessed Virgin Mary covered in glass. At the back of the church is a staircase leading to a window opening onto the back of the Virgin Mary where devotees can touch the dress of Our Lady.Bukal ng BuhayThis spring allegedly bestows miracles and blessings. On April 2005 the spring started to draw crowds of devotees along with the woman who dreamed of the Miraculous Lady of Visitation of Piat. 10 years earlier while working abroad she received a dream where it was insisted that she personally go to Piat to look for the hidden spring near the sanctuary on the hill where the Miraculous Lady was being enshrined. From that day on the spring became a crowd attraction, even drawing people from the medical fields. Devotees share stories on how they get healed of their ailments or recover from their surgical operations after drinking and washing themselves with the miraculous water drawn from this Bukal ng Buhay. The bukal was featured on several television documentaries in the Philippines such as Rated K and Kapuso Mo, Jessica Soho.------Construction of "New" Harrison Hall of table glassOn April 29, 1957, the State Department of Industrial Relations condemned any further instructional use of Harrison Hall after a building inspection. As a result, Miami allocated resources to many of the academic divisions housed within Harrison Hall to other buildings on campus including Bonham House and Ogden Hall. After this, plans for the new Harrison Hall began, which were decided upon on February 1, 1958 by the Board of Trustees. The Board stated that the new Harrison Hall should be devoted to classroom purposes and that it would house the departments of Sociology and Anthropology, Psychology, Government, and the Scripps Foundation. Bids for the construction of the new building were received on October 17, 1958 by the State Architects Office in Columbus and construction began in January. The cornerstone was laid on May 9, 1959 and was presided by the Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Hugh C. Nichols. A strike that began on June 8, 1959 interrupted the construction of the building, which was later completed in 1960.The new Harrison Hall was designed to resemble the old building, and is only about 60 percent as large as Old Main, yet it actually has more space for students and for activities. A memorandum by then President John D. Millett on April 3, 1959 discussed the potential distribution of rooms and offices within the new Harrison Hall, also stating which departments would be housed within the building. The official dedication of Harrison Hall occurred on October 8, 1960, which occurred inside one of the three lecture rooms featured within the building. The Chairman of the Board of Trustees, E.W. Nippert, presided over the ceremony, while James H. Maloon represented the State of Ohio. Harrison Hall is 40,000 square feet (3,700m2) and cost $1,004,000 to build.------Personal life of table glassVan der Gijp was married from 1988 until 1995 to Jacqueline Laats, the mother of his first son, Sanny (born 1990). In 2014, Laats published a book about their marriage called Voorgoed genezen van Ren van der Gijp ("Cured for good from Ren van der Gijp"). In the book, the ex-wife describes her turbulent marriage to van der Gijp in which she claims to have been mentally and physically abused. Van der Gijp did not respond in-depth to the allegations.After his marriage, van der Gijp was in a LAT relationship with Danille Sijthoff, the daughter of former cyclist Theo Sijthoff, who died in 2006. They had one child, Jacky (born 2001). In March 2016, Danille Sijthoff died at the age of 46.On 27 April 2020, the night of Koningsdag, van der Gijp was attacked in front of his home in Dordrecht by three men dressed in black with white masks and equipped with hammers, after he had arrived home from a live broadcast of Veronica Inside. The perpatrators were unable to cause him any harm due to the bulletproof glass in his car. Two months before the robbery, van der Gijp's home was broken into. He reacted quite laconic about this at the time. Van der Gijp called the police, as well as his son to tell him to stay inside and drove around until the police arrived. The police since stated that they would address the issue, and the mayor of Dordrecht also took this situation very seriously. Van der Gijp hired extra security guards after the incident.Van der Gijp married Minouche de Jong on 16 July 2020.------Early years of table glassCordner was the third of four sons to Edward "Ted" Cordner and Margaret Constance ne Pruen. Like his father, Cordner and his brothers Ted (1919-1996), Don (1922-2009) and John (1929-2016) were also notable sportsmen. All of them represented Melbourne Grammar School, University Blacks and Melbourne in Australian rules football.Cordner made his senior football debut in Round 5 of the 1943 VFL season against Richmond at Punt Road Oval while on leave from the Royal Australian Navy. It would be the only time he lined up with his older brothers Don and Ted. Cordner was flattened five seconds into the match, but recovered and went on to kick two goals in a losing cause. His next VFL game would be five years later, in the famous 1948 VFL Grand Final.Cordner was also a capable cricketer, known for his bowling. In an Intervarsity match at the University Oval in Sydney in 1949, he took nine wickets (six of those in the second innings) for the match to help Melbourne beat Sydney.Cordner played in the ruck in the Melbourne premiership teams in the 1948, 1955 and 1956.In September 1981, Cordner was appointed Australian Consul-General in New York. He took up the post in March 1982. Cordner's wife Pat was mugged on her first day out in New York city. In March 1984, Cordner was asked to return to Australia within three months.Cordner died of coronary heart disease on 17 October 1990 at his home in East Kew, and was buried in Point Lonsdale Cemetery. He was survived by his wife and two daughtersHe was posthumously named in the Melbourne's "Team of the Century" in 2000 as the starting ruckman.
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