What Are the Different Types of Fabrics for Bed Sheets?

A piece of cloth that covers the mattress and on which the person directly lies on is called a bed sheet and it is placed directly on the mattress. Nowadays, there are two different types of bed sheets: bottom sheets (called, fitted sheets) and top sheets (called, flat sheets). Fitted sheets are placed snugly over the mattress and flat sheets are placed on the top of fitted sheets. The bed occupant sleeps between the fitted and flat sheets. The term "bed sheet" was used for the first time in the 15th century.

• RELATED QUESTION

Cheap and simple storage for clothes, etc.?

A metal smooth shelf rack, screwed into each side of the wall on top of the shelves. Easier to find what you are looking for. Keeps your clothing neat, and gives your room plenty of color.

How can one create a wedding registry for Bed Bath and Beyond

To create a wedding registry for Bed, Bath, and Beyond, a person needs to visit the store or sign up online. A person can sign up online and choose their items inside a physical store, too, though.

Room redecoration for free or cheap?

It is very hard to picture what you are dealing with. Get some graph paper and cut out pieces to move around a graph of your room. Make each square on the paper = one foot.

Light colors usually open things up, if you can paint all the furniture the same color. Maybe some of that “Milk Paint“. Good luck.

I care for my parents they are near 80 and both are very handicapped, How do I set boundaries with them?

You ned to have a meeting of the minds with your siblings. That is too much for one person to handle. You can also get some help from a local service like helping hands.

No one believes i have OCD, but i think i do, why?

You're very smart being twelve years old and able to focus on your symptoms and describe them as OCD, well done. The thing is I have learned that OCD usually only happens to me when I feel like something was not done, and my brain refuses to accept that I did it. Luckily these things are very trivial in life, and so you do these ruituals and nobody knows because it doesn't effect them. This can go on throughout life.

I find using the word “acceptance“ very useful in moving on, when you're brain is stuck in a loop.

The other things is, I notice that lots of people count things and therein lies the problem in the first place. If you did not count the number of times that you did something, then you do not have to worry about how many times you did something. The other thing is - who made up the notion that you have to do something even number of times? Why not odd? Better still, why not once? Try it. The process is slow and is known as cognitive behavioural therapy. One day I am going to repost all that I know about OCD to people like you, so that we can all overcome this OCD nightmare, and move on with enjoying life.

How do I entertain an 8 year old girl?

You can try coloring books-who doesn't love to color. Drawing or making jewelry (purchase a bead set). If you have a video camera, you guys could tape yourselves singing. My kids love seeing themselves on t.v. Boardgames are great. Get outside if you can & play--sidewalk chalk, bubbles, basketball, softball or another sport.

will Vaseline come out in the wash? or will it ruin clothes in subsequent loads?

Use the hottest water possible and a great deal of detergent, and expect to have to run it through the wash multiple times. The clothes and sheets may be okay. No worries about washing other stuff in the washer afterwards.

do remote controls contain electromagnetic fields?

Your concern is about electromagnetic radiation. TV remotes use infrared from a light emitting diode and only shoot a beam when you press the button. The beam is no more dangerous than a small flashlight. It isn't like a cell phone. So yes, it's safe.

feeding schdule for a 14 month old baby that wakes up at 7:00am?

Feed it when he/she is hungry! Dont schedule your baby! Do YOU eat at the exact same times every day? and snack? NO. Why do people insist on this idea. If the baby is acting hungry then who cares what time it is.

Linens 'n Things or Bed Bath and Beyond?

I'm figuring that out right now as well. I was going to go with Crate & Barrel or Pottery Barn, but I figured it would put people off so I just looked at Bed, Bath & Beyond and it's a pretty happy medium for me. There's one right down the street & I see them everywhere I go. For what I need, I think BBB has more options than Linens.

Any safe lamb and rice dog foods that hasn't been recalled or killed?

There are several good foods out there. Look for something that doesn't have corn, wheat, or soy in it. Why lamb and rice? "Taste of the Wild" has a couple of good ones - Bison/Venison and Wild Fowl. These have NO grain products. Diamond Natural has a lamb/rice. You will pay more for a good food but you will feed less because the dog's body will use more of the food and they will poop less, so you end up feeding less than you would a food with corn.

Artificial intelligence developed in Lincoln saving lives

DAVID: SO A SMALL TECH START-UP IS TEACHING COMPUTERS AND CAMERAS TO THINK LIKE HUMANS, AND THE LINCOLN COMPANY JUST WON A BIG INNOVATION AWARD FROM MICROSOFT. JULIE: IT'S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE THEY SAY IS SAVING LIVES IN HOSPITALS BY PREDICTING DANGER. STEVE: I'VE ALWAYS BEEN A SOFTWARE NERD, I GUESS. NOW, IT'S -- I CARE MORE ABOUT PEOPLE THAN SOFTWARE. >> WITH THAT IN MIND, LINCOLN'S STEVE KIENE AND HIS TEAM STARTED DREAMING UP THIS PRODUCT FOR NURSES 8 YEARS AGO TO SOLVE A REAL PROBLEM IN HOSPITALS, PATIENTS GETTING OUT OF BED UNATTENDED, AND FALLING. CHRISTIE: WHEN A PATIENT FALLS, THERE ARE SO MANY BAD THINGS THAT CAN HAPPEN AND A LOT OF REALLY SIGNIFICANT CONSEQUENCES. >> CHRISTIE BARTELT IS A REHAB NURSE AT BRYAN MEDICAL CENTER IN LINCOLN. CHRISTIE: WE HAVE ALOT OF PATIENTS THAT HAVE MEMORY ISSUES, PROBLEM SOLVING ISSUES. THEY'VE HAD A STROKE, BRAIN INJURY. THEY'RE VERY HIGH RISK FOR FALL BECAUSE THEY ARE UNCOORDINATED STEVE: IN JUST THE U.S., THERE ARE OVER A MILLION HOSPITAL FALLS A YEAR. A THIRD OF THOSE FALLS RESULT IN INJURY THE HOSPITAL IS RESPONSIBLE FOR. AND 11,000 PEOPLE DIE AS A RESULT OF THAT FALL. >> THE DEVICE IS CALLED OCUVERA. IT'S A TOUCH SCREEN AND COMPUTER CONNECTED TO A 3-D CAMERA LIKE SENSOR. IT CONSTANTLY ASSESSES THE PATIENT AND ALERTS A NURSE'S PHONE. STEVE: WE'RE SIMPLY TRYING TO WATCH THE PATIENT MOST OF THE TIME SO A NURSE DOESN'T HAVE TO. >> FOR PRIVACY, HERE'S THE IMAGE THE NURSE SEES. HOW DOES THE CAMERA SEE WHAT'S GOING ON? >> IT'S VERY SIMPLE. IT SENDS OUT AN INVISIBLE LIGHT LIKE A TV REMOTE AND IT MEASURES THE TIME OF THE LIGHT TO COME BACK. JULIE: HERE'S WHERE THE ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE KICKS IN, THE DEVICE IS PROGRAMMED WITH MORE THAN 100,000 REAL VIDEO SCENARIOS OF PATIENT'S MOVEMENTS WHEN THEY'RE TRYING TO GET OUT OF BED. >> MUCH LIKE A PERSON, IT LEARNS. IT UNDERSTANDS. IT MAKES A PREDICTION. IT ALERTS A NURSE, A NURSE CAN SEE VIDEO OF THE PATIENT AND THE NURSE MAKES THE FINAL DECISION. JULIE: ALL TO STOP THE PATIENT BEFORE THEY LEAVE THE BED, REDUCING FALLS. CHRISTIE HELPED DEVELOP AND ROAD TEST OCUVERA, AND SAYS IT'S NOT A VIDEO FEED, IT'S A SMART PREDICTOR OF WHAT A PATIENT MIGHT DO. CHRISITE: IT NEVER LOOKS AWAY. NEVER BLINKS, NEVER HAS TO TAKE A BATHROOM BREAK AND CAN SEND A MESSAGE TO THE CELL PHONE THAT THE STAFF CAN CARRY AND SEND A MESSAGE DIRECTLY TO THEM. JULIE: THERE ARE 150 OCUVERA UNITS IN A DOZEN HOSPITALS. STEVE: EVERY NURSE HAS A TOUCH SCREEN DEVICE IN THEIR POCKET. YOU SIMPLY BRING THIS INTO THE ROOM, EVERY ROOM HAS A DOCK, DROP IT IN THERE AND YOU ARE DONE. JULIE: AND STEVE SAYS THIS IS ARTIFICAL INTELLIGENCE THAT EMPOWERS NURSES. IT'S SOFTWARE THAT CARES. STEVE: IT'S UP ON OUR WALL. OUR SOFTWARE SAVES LIVES. JULIE: REALLY COOL TECHNOLOGY. BARTELT SAYS SHE'S SEEN SIGNIFICANTLY FEWER PEOPLE FALL GETTING OUT OF HOSPITAL BEDS. OCUVERA JUST WON THE MICROSOFT HEALTHCARE INNOVATION AWARD. THE COMPANY IS LOOKING FOR NVESTORS AND WORKERS. YOU CAN FIND THE LINK TO THEIR WEBSITE IN THIS STORY AT KETV A small tech start-up company in Lincoln, NE, is teaching computers and sensors to "think" like humans in order to save lives. And the company just won a Healthcare Innovation Award from Microsoft."Everything we do is centered around the nurse. It's about the nurse," said Steve Keine, founder and CEO of Ocuvera.The company of 15 people created a device using artificial intelligence that they said can prevent patient falls in hospitals by "predicting" when a person is going to exit the bed. Many hospital falls are attributed to a confused, weak, or unaccompanied patient trying to leave bed."In the U.S. there are over a million hospital falls a year, a third of those falls result in an injury the hospital is responsible for and 11,000 die as a result of that fall," said Keine.Keine and his team started developing the remote, wall-mounted device 8 years ago. It uses a camera-like sensor connected to a computer that's programmed with more than 100,000 real patient videos that help the computer predict whether a patient is trying to get out of bed. For privacy, the image produced by the sensor does not show detail, but an image of the person in bed. Keine said the idea is to stop the patient before they leave, preventing a possible fall.The sensor sends an alarm to the patient's nurse via a cell phone, showing a real time view of what is going on in the room. The nurse has the ability to talk to the patient through the phone or respond to the room. "I was sold on it as soon as they described it to me," said nurse, Christie Bartelt, who manages the rehabilitation unit at Bryan Health System in Lincoln. "We have a lot of patients that have memory issues, problem solving issues, they've had a stroke, they've had a brain injury. They are at very high risk of a fall because they are very uncoordinated," said Bartelt. Bryan's been test-driving the system for three years and Christie said nurses rely on it. "This never looks away. Never blinks, never has to take a bathroom break and can send a message to the cell phone," Bartelt said.Bartelt said the devices are used permanently on her floor."We did see a significant decrease in our bed exit falls-- significant," she emphasized. She said they had just three patients fall last year while leaving the hospital bed.Keine said their research has shown the devices have reduced falls by 95-percent or more. He also thinks the product could be used during the COVID-19 crisis for patient's who are hospitalized, but not on a ventilator, offering less direct contact and remote communication. Ocuvera is being used in a dozen hospitals, with 150 devices in place. The company is looking for investors to help bring the product to the next level. Keine said they've spent $8,000,000 developing and testing the product. He said they need about a half million dollars more and they would love to find investors in the Omaha area. Keine said the company is also hiring people working in healthcare to work for Ocuvera.Keine said the computer in the system is from Intel, the camera-sensor technology is Microsoft, the plastic parts come from China and the product is assembled in Lincoln. Keine said he's a "software nerd" but he cares more about people. "Five years ago I had my first baby and I was doing a software deal and I am like, 'What am I doing?', I want to do something meaningful. What is meaningful is right in front of me," said Keine.To learn more about Ocuvera, go to www.ocuvera.com A small tech start-up company in Lincoln, NE, is teaching computers and sensors to "think" like humans in order to save lives. And the company just won a Healthcare Innovation Award from Microsoft. "Everything we do is centered around the nurse. It's about the nurse," said Steve Keine, founder and CEO of Ocuvera. The company of 15 people created a device using artificial intelligence that they said can prevent patient falls in hospitals by "predicting" when a person is going to exit the bed. Many hospital falls are attributed to a confused, weak, or unaccompanied patient trying to leave bed. Steve Keine is the founder and CEO of Ocuvera. The company is looking for investors from Omaha. "In the U.S. there are over a million hospital falls a year, a third of those falls result in an injury the hospital is responsible for and 11,000 die as a result of that fall," said Keine. Keine and his team started developing the remote, wall-mounted device 8 years ago. It uses a camera-like sensor connected to a computer that's programmed with more than 100,000 real patient videos that help the computer predict whether a patient is trying to get out of bed. For privacy, the image produced by the sensor does not show detail, but an image of the person in bed. The sensor sends an alert to the phone of a nurse. Keine said the idea is to stop the patient before they leave, preventing a possible fall. The sensor sends an alarm to the patient's nurse via a cell phone, showing a real time view of what is going on in the room. The nurse has the ability to talk to the patient through the phone or respond to the room. "I was sold on it as soon as they described it to me," said nurse, Christie Bartelt, who manages the rehabilitation unit at Bryan Health System in Lincoln. "We have a lot of patients that have memory issues, problem solving issues, they've had a stroke, they've had a brain injury. They are at very high risk of a fall because they are very uncoordinated," said Bartelt. Bryan's been test-driving the system for three years and Christie said nurses rely on it. "This never looks away. Never blinks, never has to take a bathroom break and can send a message to the cell phone," Bartelt said. Bartelt said the devices are used permanently on her floor. "We did see a significant decrease in our bed exit falls-- significant," she emphasized. She said they had just three patients fall last year while leaving the hospital bed. Keine said their research has shown the devices have reduced falls by 95-percent or more. He also thinks the product could be used during the COVID-19 crisis for patient's who are hospitalized, but not on a ventilator, offering less direct contact and remote communication. Ocuvera is being used in a dozen hospitals, with 150 devices in place. The company is looking for investors to help bring the product to the next level. Keine said they've spent $8,000,000 developing and testing the product. He said they need about a half million dollars more and they would love to find investors in the Omaha area. Keine said the company is also hiring people working in healthcare to work for Ocuvera. Keine said the computer in the system is from Intel, the camera-sensor technology is Microsoft, the plastic parts come from China and the product is assembled in Lincoln. Keine said he's a "software nerd" but he cares more about people. "Five years ago I had my first baby and I was doing a software deal and I am like, 'What am I doing?', I want to do something meaningful. What is meaningful is right in front of me," said Keine. To learn more about Ocuvera, go to www.ocuvera.com

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